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Lecture 0: Introduction

Lecture 0: Introduction

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Lecture 0: Introduction

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  1. Lecture 0: Introduction EEN 312: Processors: Hardware, Software, and Interfacing Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fall 2012, Dr. Rozier (UM)

  2. Welcome to EEN 312!

  3. Professor Eric Rozier ROSE-E-A

  4. Who am I? • BS in Computer Science from William and Mary

  5. Who am I? • BS in Computer Science from William and Mary • Studied models of agricultural pests (flour beetles).

  6. Who am I? • BS in Computer Science from William and Mary • Studied models of agricultural pests (flour beetles). • And load balancing of super computers.

  7. Who am I? • First job – NASA Langley Research Center

  8. Who am I? • First job – NASA Langley Research Center • Researched problems in aeroacoustics

  9. Who am I? • First job – NASA Langley Research Center • Researched problems in aeroacoustics • Primarily on the XV-15

  10. Who am I? • First job – NASA Langley Research Center • Researched problems in aeroacoustics • Primarily on the XV-15 • Precursor to the better known V-22

  11. Who am I? • PhD in CS/ECE from the University of Illinois

  12. Who am I? • PhD in CS/ECE from the University of Illinois • Studied non-linear dynamics of transactivation networks in economically important species…

  13. Who am I? • PhD in CS/ECE from the University of Illinois • Studied non-linear dynamics of transactivation networks in economically important species… corn…

  14. Who am I? • PhD in CS/ECE from the University of Illinois • Worked with the NCSA on problems in super computing, reliability, and big data.

  15. Who am I? • PhD in CS/ECE from the University of Illinois • Worked with the NCSA on problems in super computing, reliability, and big data. • Research led to patented advances with IBM

  16. Who am I? • Served as a visiting scientist and IBM Fellow at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA • Helped advance state of the art in fault-tolerance, and our understanding of why systems fail

  17. Who am I? • Postdoctoral work at the Information Trust Institute • Worked on Blue Waters Super Computer, first sustained Petaflop machine • Designed new fault-tolerant methods for data protection on large-scale systems

  18. Who am I? • Assistant Professor at UM ECE

  19. Who am I? • Assistant Professor at UM ECE • Head of the Trustworthy Systems Lab

  20. Who am I? • Assistant Professor at UM ECE • Head of the Trustworthy Systems Lab • Working on problems in: • Cloud computing • Big Data • Reliability • Security • Compliance

  21. How to get in touch with me? • Office • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering • Fifth Floor, Room 517 • Contact Information • Email: e.rozier@miami.edu • Phone: 8-9752 • Currently looking for motivated students • Research projects and papers

  22. Office Hours • Office • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering • Fifth Floor, Room 517

  23. COURSE SUMMARY AND OVERVIEW

  24. EEN 312 • Processors: Hardware, Software, and Interfacing • Class: MM 102 • Lab: McArthur Engineering Building 402 • Class website • http://performalumni.org/erozier2/een312.html

  25. The syllabus…

  26. Grades

  27. Grades • Guaranteed Grades • A+’s are assigned on the basis of exceptional work, scoring 99 or 100 for the entire course.

  28. Labs • Labs are a HUGE component of this course • Lab sessions will be held based on the session you have been assigned and registered for. • Labs for this class will be very demanding. It is unlikely you will finish them during the assigned sessions. • You will need to make good use of your assigned laboratory time to seek guidance from your TAs, but you should expect to spend significant time outside of lab working on your lab assignments.

  29. Active Learning • After 2 weeks we tend to remember: • Passive learning • 10% of what we read • 20% of what we hear • 30% of what we see • 50% of what we hear and see • Active learning • 70% of what we say • 90% of what we say and do

  30. Bloom’s Taxonomy Evaluation Synthesis Analysis Application Comprehension Knowledge

  31. Training Good Engineers • Understanding processors isn’t our only goal • Critical Reading • Critical Reasoning • Ask questions! • Think through problems! • Challenge assumptions!

  32. 312

  33. 118 304 312

  34. Course overview • Understanding the abstractions beneath your applications and programs. • We will focus on: • How programs are translated into machine language. • How hardware executes machineinstructions. • How computers are organized anddesigned.

  35. Course Components • Class time • High level concepts • Hands on exercises and application • Discussions • Labs • The heart of the course • 1-2 weeks each • Indepth exploration of an aspect of system design and organization • Exams • 2 Midterms + 1 Final • Test your understanding of concepts and mathematics

  36. Textbook

  37. Textbook • Be sure to get the 4th edition! • Available from the bookstore • New: $89.95 • Used: $67.50 • Available online • Softback: $61.98 (Amazon) • Kindle: $71.99 • Kindle Rental: ~$35 • The textbook is essential for this course.

  38. Laboratories

  39. Laboratories • TAs • Yilin Yan • y.yan4@umiami.edu • Murat Aykin • m.aykin@umiami.edu • Lab Sections • Wednesday 2:30 – 4:50p • Friday 2:30 – 4:50p

  40. Lab Procedure • Labs will be completed in groups of 2-3. • You may complete labs as a group, but you must each hand in a separate lab assignment. • You may change groups with each lab.

  41. Raspberry Pi

  42. Lab Pis

  43. Lab Pis • We have a set of 16 Raspberry Pis available for the class. Each group will be assigned one for each lab. • Don’t use an unassigned Pi! • Some of our labs will have the potential to reboot the platform, or worse! One group per Pi! • Pis used for the lab are accessible from the school network.

  44. Laboratory Assignments • The labs for this class will require a lot of time. • Start them early. • Labs will be assigned in class on Tuesday before the first lab session. • It is recommended you prepare any questions for your first laboratory session in advance! • Labs are typically due at the beginning of your lab session, 2 weeks after they are assigned.

  45. Laboratory Assignments • Each student is allocated 3 slip days for the semester. • A slip day can be used to extend the due date for a laboratory by 1 day, no questions asked. • You should indicate on your submitted assignment how many slip days are being used. • No other extensions will be granted except in the case of a documented emergency. • Late work suffers • A -20% on the first day it is late. • A -40% on the second day it is late. • A -60% on the third day it is late. • No credit for four days or more late.

  46. Examinations • Examinations • Midterm I – February 13th in class • Midterm II – March 3rd in class • Final Exam – May 1st from 11:00a – 1:30p in MM-102.

  47. Course Plan • University of Miami Honor Code is in effect • Open hands policy on assignments • Late policy • Late assignments are only accepted if arrangements are made ahead of time • Electronic device policy • Laptops and tablets are ok as long as they’re being used for class • Silence cell phones please

  48. ON ABSTRACTIONS

  49. Abstraction and Reality • Most courses in CS/ECE emphasize abstractions • Abstract data types • Abstract analysis • Abstractions have limits • Reality raises its ugly heads as bugs in design and implementation. • Understanding the details of underlying systems becomes important!