Download
positively responsive n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Positively Responsive PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Positively Responsive

Positively Responsive

240 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Positively Responsive

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Positively Responsive Presented by: Bridgette Long Natalie Rapp Infant/Toddler Specialist Infant/Toddler Specialist Southwest Regional Key Northwest Regional Key August 8, 2012

  2. The relationship between an infant and her or his caregiver is at the heart of high quality infant/toddler care. • Through experiencing the warmth and support of caring adults, children gain a basis for development and learning in all the domains. What is Responsive Caregiving?

  3. What are some challenging behaviors that you’re experiencing in your classroom right now? • Let’s work through these behaviors as a group. What’s happening in your classroom?

  4. Matching Quiz Questions: • In order to be truly responsive, the caregiver must _____. • A relaxed, alert mental state can help _____. • Proficiency at being responsive comes from repeated experiences of _____. • Responsiveness includes trial and error. Every caregiving act _____. • As caregivers become more attuned to the meaning of children’s expressions, gestures, sounds, and behavior, _____. Possible answers a) the caregiver concentrate on a child’s behavior and attitude. b) will not be in tune. c) being with infants becomes more interesting and enjoyable. d) cultivate the ability to be present with the child in that moment. e) observing a child, attempting to read the cues modifying one’s behavior, and reading the cues again. Let’s apply it…

  5. Matching Quiz Questions: • In order to be truly responsive, the caregiver must d . • A relaxed, alert mental state can help a . • Proficiency at being responsive comes from repeated experiences of e . • Responsiveness includes trial and error. Every caregiving act b . • As caregivers become more attuned to the meaning of children’s expressions, gestures, sounds, and behavior, c . Possible answers a) the caregiver concentrate on a child’s behavior and attitude. b) will not be in tune. c) being with infants becomes more interesting and enjoyable. d) cultivate the ability to be present with the child in that moment. e) observing a child, attempting to read the cues modifying one’s behavior, and reading the cues again.

  6. Magda Gerber’s Approach to Professional Infant/Toddler Care – video clip Respectfully Yours

  7. Pair up with someone you don’t know. • One person from each pair is to step outside the room for instructions. They will be the “caregivers.” • The other person will be asked to wet his/her hands in a bowl/tub of water. May I Dry Your Hands?

  8. How did you feel while the first hand was being dried? • How did you feel while the second hand was being dried? Reflection

  9. Video clip – mother and child experiment Still face experiments Still Face Experiments

  10. How must it affect infants when what they CAN do is not appreciated, and what they cannot do is expected? ~Magda Gerber

  11. Positive Guidance

  12. Handout 1.16 • Reframe the following statements: • He constantly snatches toys from all the other children. • She never listens to anything I tell her to do. • He is so mean, and always hits and pushes the other children. • She just wants all the attention all the time. Reframing Activity

  13. (from Developmentally Appropriate Practice, 3rd Edition) • INTERACTIONS • Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers spend most of the day holding or touching infants, in one-on-one interactions that are warm and caring. Caregivers stroke and pat infants and talk in a pleasant, calm voice, making frequent eye contact. • In Contrast • Caregivers leave infants for long periods in cribs, playpens, or seats. They follow “no-touch policies,” ignoring the importance of touch to children’s healthy development. • Caregivers interact with infants harshly or impersonally, or they ignore infants’ cues that they do not want to be held or touched. Or they give more attention and warmth to certain children (e.g., in family care, favoring their own child). Responsive Routines for Infants • Caregivers learn to watch for each infant’s cues, so they are able to judge when the baby needs to eat, is uncomfortable, or would like to be held. • Caregivers give attention and care according to their own schedule or preferences rather than children’s.

  14. In Contrast • Caregivers are unpredictable in their responses, don’t respond at all, or respond in ways that are not caring or specific to the child. • Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers respond consistently to infants’ needs for food and comfort in ways that are caring and specific to each child. Over time infants develop trust in these adults who care for them, from which they generalize that the world is a secure place for them to explore and that they themselves are loveable and worthy. • RESPECT FOR INFANTS AS PEOPLE • Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers often talk to the infant about what is going on (e.g., “I am putting your sweater on now so we can go outside”), especially to an older infant who can understand somewhat. Caregivers treat each baby like the person he or she is – that is, caregivers respect the child not just as “becoming” but as already “being” someone who has preferences, moods, and thoughts. • In Contrast • Caregivers move the infant about without explaining why, sometimes abruptly or at the adult’s convenience. They act as if children are a bother or are cute, doll-like objects rather than people.

  15. (from Developmentally Appropriate Practice, 3rd Edition) • INTERACTIONS • Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers spend most of the day in one-on-one interactions with toddlers. The tone of the interactions is warm and caring; caregivers use pleasant, calm voices as well as simple language and nonverbal cues. • In Contrast • Caregivers leave some toddlers alone for long periods and give their energy and attention to other children (e.g., in family care, favoring their own child). Or caregivers focus their attention elsewhere altogether and don’t interact much with children. • Caregivers interact with toddlers in a harsh or impersonal manner. Responsive Routines for Toddlers • Caregivers give attention and care according to their own schedule or preferences rather than children’s. • Caregivers are unpredictable in their responses, don’t respond at all, or respond in ways that are not caring or specific to the child. • Caregivers learn each toddler’s cues and respond consistently in ways that are caring and specific to each child, which lets the child explore, knowing he can trust the adults to be there for help or comfort as needed.

  16. Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers comfort toddlers and let them know they are valued through warm responsive touches, such as pats on the back and hugs and holding toddlers in their laps. Caregivers are sensitive to whether a child welcomes the touches. • In Contrast • Caregivers follow “no-touch policies,” ignoring the importance of touch to children’s healthy development. • Caregivers ignore children’s cues that they do not want to be held or touched. • Caregivers create an emotionally and physically inclusive classroom. They give every toddler warm, responsive care. They make sure that spatial organization, materials, and activities are planned such that all children can participate actively (e.g., a child with a physical disability eats at the table with other children). • Caregivers do not include children with special needs in all activities (e.g., a child who requires adaptive equipment or special procedures eats or plays apart from peers). • In Contrast • Caregivers prohibit toddlers from bringing a favored object (e.g., a blanket or toy) from home. Or they arbitrarily take the object away or expect a toddler to share it with other children. • Children are not given choices, and having/expressing preferences is not encouraged. Children are all expected to do the same thing. • RESPECT FOR TODDLERS AS PEOPLE • Developmentally appropriate • Caregivers respect each child’s developing preferences for familiar objects, foods, and people. They permit toddlers to keep their own favorite objects, and they let children choose (from a limited set of options) what they prefer to eat or wear.

  17. Final thoughts or questions? • Please complete your Instructor Evaluation form. • Please take time to reflect in your journal what you’ve learned today, and how you might incorporate it into your program. Wrap Up