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Unit 2-1 Exam Questions

Unit 2-1 Exam Questions

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Unit 2-1 Exam Questions

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  1. Unit 2-1 Exam Questions

  2. Directions • In the Table of Contents, click the topic for which you want to see regents exam questions • Click the indicated icon to begin the slide show • Press the right arrow key on the keyboard once to reveal the answer • Press the right arrow key once more to advance to the next question • Press the icon at any time to return to the table of contents.

  3. Table of Contents • Mayflower Compact • Virginia House of Burgesses • Salutary Neglect • Mercantilism • New England Town Meeting • “No Taxation Without Representation” • Boycott • Enlightenment Period • Social Contract • Consent of The Governed • Proclamation of 1763 • Common Sense • Declaration of Independence • Articles of Confederation • Northwest Ordinance • Land Ordinance of 1785 • Constitutional Conventions • Great Compromise • Three-fifths Compromise • United States Constitution • Preamble • Ratification • Bill of Rights • Civil Liberties • Habeas Corpus • Bicameral • Representation • Checks And Balances • Federalist • Anti-Federalist • Constitutional Interpretation • Unwritten Constitution • Separation of Powers • Elastic Clause • Necessary And Proper Clause • Implied Powers • Supremacy Clause • Federalism • Reserved Powers • DelegatedPowers • Enumerated Powers • Concurrent Powers • Census • Electoral College • Impeachment Process

  4. Mayflower Compact In colonial America, the House of Burgesses, the Mayflower Compact, and town hall meetings were all developments that led to the (1) regulation of trade with Native American Indians (2) protection of the rights of women (3) elimination of the power of the upper classes (4) creation of representative government

  5. Mayflower Compact Which heading best completes the partial outline below? (1) Attempts to Overthrow British Rule (2) Development of Self-Government in the American Colonies (3) Establishment of British Parliamentary Control Over the Colonies (4) Social Reform Movements in the American Colonies

  6. Mayflower Compact The Mayflower Compact is considered an important step in the development of American democracy because it (1) established the principle of separation of church and state (2) provided a basis for self-government in the Plymouth Colony (3) defined relations with local Native American Indians (4) outlawed slavery in the Massachusetts Bay Colony

  7. Mayflower Compact The Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses are most closely associated with (1) abuses by absolute monarchs (2) establishment of religious toleration (3) steps toward colonial self-government (4) adoption of universal suffrage

  8. Mayflower Compact The Mayflower Compact, New England town meetings, and the Virginia House of Burgesses are examples of (1) early colonial efforts in self-government (2) colonial protests against British taxation (3) governments imposed by Parliament (4) attempts to limit democracy

  9. Mayflower Compact The Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses are examples of (1) equal opportunities for women during the colonial period (2) steps toward representative government (3) economic agreements between the colonists and Native American Indians (4) limitations placed on colonial Americans by the British government

  10. Virginia House of Burgesses The Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses are most closely associated with (1) abuses by absolute monarchs (2) establishment of religious toleration (3) steps toward colonial self-government (4) adoption of universal suffrage

  11. Virginia House of Burgesses The Mayflower Compact, New England town meetings, and the Virginia House of Burgesses are examples of (1) early colonial efforts in self-government (2) colonial protests against British taxation (3) governments imposed by Parliament (4) attempts to limit democracy

  12. Virginia House of Burgesses The Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses are examples of (1) equal opportunities for women during the colonial period (2) steps toward representative government (3) economic agreements between the colonists and Native American Indians (4) limitations placed on colonial Americans by the British government

  13. Salutary Neglect Before 1763, the British policy of salutary neglect toward its American colonies was based on the desire of Great Britain to (1) treat all English people, including colonists, on an equal basis (2) benefit from the economic prosperity of the American colonies (3) encourage manufacturing in the American colonies (4) ensure that all mercantile regulations were strictly followed

  14. Salutary Neglect During the early to mid-1700s, the British policy of salutary neglect toward the American colonies contributed to (1) a decline in colonial manufacturing (2) the decline of slavery in the northern colonies (3) a decrease in French and Spanish influence in North America (4) the development of independent colonial trade practices

  15. Mercantilism Which statement about the British colonial policy of mercantilism is most accurate? (1) Raw materials from the colonies were shipped to England. (2) England encouraged the colonies to seek independence. (3) The colonies were required to send manufactured goods to Europe. (4) The British opposed the use of slave labor in the colonies.

  16. Mercantilism Which economic policy was based on the idea that the American colonies existed primarily to provide economic benefits for Great Britain? (1) mercantilism (2) socialism (3) free trade (4) laissez-faire capitalism

  17. Mercantilism According to the theory of mercantilism, the principal purpose of the thirteen original colonies was to provide Great Britain with (1) naval bases (2) raw materials and markets (3) workers and manufactured goods (4) military recruits

  18. Mercantilism During the colonial period, the British Parliament used the policy of mercantilism to (1) limit manufacturing in America (2) prevent criticism of royal policies (3) deny representation to the colonists (4) force colonists to worship in the Anglican Church

  19. Mercantilism . . . I challenge the warmest advocate [supporter] for reconciliation, to shew [show], a single advantage that this continent can reap [gain], by being connected with Great Britain. I repeat the challenge, not a single advantage is derived [acquired]. Our corn will fetch its price in any market in Europe, and our imported goods must be paid for, buy them where we will. . . . — Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776 This speaker is most likely opposed to (1) mercantilism (2) capitalism (3) direct democracy (4) representative government

  20. Mercantilism In its economic relationship with its North American colonies, Great Britain followed the principles of 18th-century mercantilism by (1) outlawing the African slave trade (2) limiting the colonies’ trade with other nations (3) encouraging the development of manufacturing in the colonies (4) establishing laws against business monopolies

  21. Mercantilism Which heading best completes the partial outline below? (1) Protests Against Slavery in the American Colonies (2) British Parliamentary Actions to Punish Colonial Americans (3) Colonial Responses to British Mercantile Policies (4) Colonial Attempts to End the British Policy of Salutary Neglect

  22. New England Town Meetings Which heading best completes the partial outline below? (1) Attempts to Overthrow British Rule (2) Development of Self-Government in the American Colonies (3) Establishment of British Parliamentary Control Over the Colonies (4) Social Reform Movements in the American Colonies

  23. New England Town Meetings The Mayflower Compact, New England town meetings, and the Virginia House of Burgesses are examples of (1) early colonial efforts in self-government (2) colonial protests against British taxation (3) governments imposed by Parliament (4) attempts to limit democracy

  24. No Taxation Without Representation The colonists’ slogan, “No taxation without representation,” expresses a belief in (1) free trade (2) economic interdependence (3) the supremacy of Parliament (4) the consent of the governed

  25. Boycott American colonists showed their opposition to the British taxation and trade restrictions of the 1760s primarily by (1) supporting the French against the British (2) boycotting products from Great Britain (3) overthrowing the royal governors in most of the colonies (4) purchasing additional products from Native American Indian tribes

  26. Enlightenment Period French Enlightenment philosopher Baron De Montesquieu praised the British political system because it divided the power of government between the monarch and the two houses of Parliament. Which principle included in the United States Constitution shows that the framers agreed with Montesquieu? (1) separation of powers (2) federal supremacy (3) implied powers (4) due process

  27. Social Contract Which document is most closely associated with John Locke’s social contract theory of government? (1) Albany Plan of Union (2) Declaration of Independence (3) Treaty of Paris (1783) (4) Sedition Act of 1798

  28. Social Contract In the Declaration of Independence, the argument for freedom from British rule is based primarily on the (1) theory of divine right expressed by James I (2) economic principles set forth by Adam Smith (3) social contract theory of government developed by John Locke (4) belief in a strong central government expressed by Alexander Hamilton

  29. Social Contract The principles of government that Thomas Jefferson included in the Declaration of Independence were most influenced by (1) John Locke’s social contract theory (2) Adam Smith’s ideas of free enterprise (3) Louis XIV’s belief in divine right (4) William Penn’s views on religious toleration

  30. Consent of the Governed “. . .That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, . . . ” — Declaration of Independence Which provision of the original United States Constitution was most influenced by this ideal? (1) enabling the president to select a cabinet (2) providing for direct election of the House of Representatives (3) allowing the Senate to try articles of impeachment (4) authorizing the Supreme Court to rule on disputes between states

  31. Consent of the Governed The colonists’ slogan, “No taxation without representation,” expresses a belief in (1) free trade (2) economic interdependence (3) the supremacy of Parliament (4) the consent of the governed

  32. Consent of the Governed One of the principles stated in the Declaration of Independence is that government should (1) guarantee economic equality among citizens (2) have unlimited power to rule the people (3) be based upon the consent of the governed (4) be led by educated citizens

  33. Proclamation of 1763 This map shows the western limit on colonial settlement that resulted from the (1) founding of Jamestown (2) Proclamation of 1763 (3) Monroe Doctrine (4) Compromise of 1850

  34. Proclamation of 1763 Which geographic feature was used to establish the Proclamation Line of 1763? (1) Great Lakes (2) Rocky Mountains (3) Appalachian Mountains (4) Mississippi River

  35. Proclamation of 1763 The main reason Great Britain established the Proclamation Line of 1763 was to (1) avoid conflicts between American colonists and Native American Indians (2) make a profit by selling the land west of the Appalachian Mountains (3) prevent American industrial development in the Ohio River valley (4) allow Canada to control the Great Lakes region

  36. Common Sense In the publication Common Sense, Thomas Paine argued that the American colonies should (1) approve the Treaty of Paris (1763) (2) ratify the Constitution of the United States (3) end their political relationship with Great Britain (4) support the policies of King George III

  37. Common Sense In the pamphlet Common Sense, Thomas Paine urged the American colonists to (1) oppose the French colonization of North America (2) compromise with the British (3) reaffirm their loyalty to King George III (4) declare their independence from Great Britain

  38. Common Sense Thomas Paine’s publication Common Sense was most influential in persuading American colonists to support (1) additional British taxes on the colonies (2) colonial independence (3) the Whiskey Rebellion (4) continued ties with Great Britain

  39. Common Sense . . . I challenge the warmest advocate [supporter] for reconciliation, to shew [show], a single advantage that this continent can reap [gain], by being connected with Great Britain. I repeat the challenge, not a single advantage is derived [acquired]. Our corn will fetch its price in any market in Europe, and our imported goods must be paid for, buy them where we will. . . . — Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776 This speaker is most likely opposed to (1) mercantilism (2) capitalism (3) direct democracy (4) representative government

  40. Common Sense In the publication Common Sense, Thomas Paine argued that (1) foreign nations would reject an independent American government (2) the British government would be impossible to overthrow (3) America was dependent on British trade and protection (4) the American colonies should break away from England

  41. Common Sense “. . . Every thing that is right or reasonable pleads for separation. The blood of the slain, the weeping voice of nature cries, ’TIS TIME TO PART. . . .” — Thomas Paine, Common Sense In this quotation, Thomas Paine is trying to convince the colonists to (1) accept the Proclamation of 1763 (2) break a treaty with Spain (3) declare their independence from England (4) dissolve their alliance with France

  42. Declaration of Independence Which document included John Locke’s idea that people have the right to overthrow an oppressive government? (1) Mayflower Compact (2) Northwest Ordinance (3) Declaration of Independence (4) Bill of Rights

  43. Declaration of Independence John Locke’s theory of natural rights, as reflected in the Declaration of Independence, states that (1) government is the source of all individual rights (2) power should be concentrated in the monarchy (3) power to govern belongs to the people (4) individual liberties are best protected by a strong government

  44. Declaration of Independence In the Declaration of Independence, the argument for freedom from British rule is based primarily on the (1) theory of divine right expressed by James I (2) economic principles set forth by Adam Smith (3) social contract theory of government developed by John Locke (4) belief in a strong central government expressed by Alexander Hamilton

  45. Declaration of Independence One of the principles stated in the Declaration of Independence is that government should (1) guarantee economic equality among citizens (2) have unlimited power to rule the people (3) be based upon the consent of the governed (4) be led by educated citizens

  46. Declaration of Independence According to the Declaration of Independence, the fundamental purpose of government is to (1) protect people’s natural rights (2) equalize opportunities for all citizens (3) provide for the defense of the nation (4) establish a system of free public education

  47. Declaration of Independence A major argument for American independence found in the Declaration of Independence was that the British (1) stopped participating in the slave trade (2) refused to sell products to Americans (3) deprived Americans of their natural rights (4) censored American representatives in Parliament

  48. Declaration of Independence The principles of government that Thomas Jefferson included in the Declaration of Independence were most influenced by (1) John Locke’s social contract theory (2) Adam Smith’s ideas of free enterprise (3) Louis XIV’s belief in divine right (4) William Penn’s views on religious toleration

  49. Declaration of Independence In writing the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson was influenced most by John Locke’s idea of (1) due process of law (2) natural rights (3) the rights of the accused (4) the right to privacy

  50. Declaration of Independence Which document is most closely associated with John Locke’s social contract theory of government? (1) Albany Plan of Union (2) Declaration of Independence (3) Treaty of Paris (1783) (4) Sedition Act of 1798