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Control of Food Hazards

Control of Food Hazards

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Control of Food Hazards

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  1. Section 2 - Module 5.1 Control of Food Hazards

  2. Control of Food Hazards: Presentation Outline • Controlling food hazards to reduce the risk of unsafe food • Focusing on food safety relevant process steps • Implementing effective control procedures Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  3. Food producers must control operations Safety and suitability of final product requires controls CONTROL OF OPERATIONS Air step step step step materials Water Raw materials Final product Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  4. Effective controls prevent food safety hazards Hazard = the potential to cause harm • Codex defines hazard as a • biological, chemical or physical agent in, or • condition of, • food with the potential to cause an adverse health effect. Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  5. Deciding which hazards are of relevance in foods Guidance material to help businesses understand which hazards are relevant to their foods is provided by authorities. Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  6. Controlling food hazards will reduce the risk of unsafe food Risk = likelihood of a hazard doing harm FAO and WHO define risk as a function of the probability of an adverse effect and the magnitude of that effect, consequential to a hazard(s) in food. Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  7. Understanding the risk associated with a hazard Pasteurising milk reduces the risk of food-borne illness Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  8. negligible risk major risk minor risk Estimating the risk helps to decide where to improve controls/processes Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  9. Food safety risk analysis at government level Authorities will • consider a larger number of factors, and • need to apply a wider scope of activities Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  10. Control of Food Hazards: Presentation Outline • Controlling food hazards to reduce the risk of unsafe food • Focusing on food safety relevant process steps • Implementing effective control procedures Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  11. Herbs Weigh PASTEURISING Water Heat Weigh Steep Filter Pasteurise Cool Juices Defrost Weigh Sugar Weigh BOTTLING RECEPTION OF RAW MATERIALS PREPARATION OF RAW MATERIALS Bottles Rinse (O3) Bottle Clean (UV) Lids Label Store Transport Understanding which operations are relevant to food safety Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  12. Identifying quality-relevant operations/process steps Quality relevant Herbs Weigh PASTEURISING Water Heat Weigh Steep Filter Pasteurise Cool Juices Defrost Weigh Sugar Weigh BOTTLING RECEPTION OF RAW MATERIALS PREPARATION OF RAW MATERIALS Bottles Rinse (O3) Bottle Clean (UV) Lids Label Store Transport Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  13. Identifying safety-relevant operations/process steps Safety relevant Safety relevant Herbs Weigh PASTEURISING Water Heat Weigh Steep Filter Pasteurise Cool Juices Defrost Weigh Sugar Weigh BOTTLING RECEPTION OF RAW MATERIALS PREPARATION OF RAW MATERIALS Bottles Rinse (O3) Bottle Clean (UV) Lids Label Store Transport Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  14. A processor must understand the effect of each step on food safety Quality- and safety-relevant process steps are not always fully separable. Safety relevant Quality relevant Herbs Weigh Heat Weigh Water Juices Defrost Weigh Weigh Sugar RECEPTION OF RAW MATERIALS PREPARATION OF RAW MATERIALS Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  15. Control of Food Hazards: Presentation Outline • Controlling food hazards to reduce the risk of unsafe food • Focusing on food safety relevant process steps • Implementing effective control procedures Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  16. Many simple procedures are effective in controlling food safety Examples of simple procedures: • correctly loading refrigerated display units • calibrating equipment • checking stock rotation Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  17. Only standardised processes can be effectively controlled Ensure standardisation through: • Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) • Regular monitoring • Training of personnel Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  18. SOPs explain exactly how each process is performed Herbs Weigh PASTEURISING Water Heat Weigh Steep Filter Pasteurise Cool Juices Defrost Weigh Sugar Weigh BOTTLING RECEPTION OF RAW MATERIALS PREPARATION OF RAW MATERIALS Bottles Rinse (O3) Bottle Clean (UV) Lids Label Store Transport Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  19. PASTEURISING SOP • Switch on boiler system 4 hours prior to starting pasteurisation and heat water to 90°C. • Upon starting pasteurisation production manager must control boiler temperature and record value in “(name of document)”. • ... Filter Pasteurise Cool SOPs should not leave room for interpretation Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  20. PASTEURISING Filter Pasteurise Cool Monitoring of process steps sometimes involves recording values SOP • Switch on boiler system 4 hours prior to starting pasteurisation and heat water to 90°C. • Upon starting pasteurisation production manager must control boiler temperature and record value in “(name of document)”. • ... Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  21. Including standard operating instructions in forms Form Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  22. Provide adequate training and equipment Train operators and provide adequate equipment Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  23. Measuring parameters does not require complicated equipment But they need to be effective in measuring: • Temperature • Moisture content • pH • Water activity • Colour Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  24. Measuring equipment does not always provide accurate data calibration Accuracy no calibration Time Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  25. How to calibrate equipment Use Standard solutions to calibrate pH meters Use Ice-water / boiling water to calibrate Thermometers Use Standard weights to calibrate Scales Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  26. Calibration needs to be recorded Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  27. Monitor values and control records Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  28. Control of Food Hazards: Conclusions • Food operators must understand the types of food hazards that are relevant to their production and which risk these hazards pose to the health of consumers. • By understanding which process steps are relevant to food safety a food processor can better control hazards. • Only standardised processes performed by trained personnel who are aware of their responsibilities can be effectively controlled. • Calibrated measuring equipment must be availalbe to control processes. • Monitoring process steps/calibration requires the recording of data. Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards

  29. YOU ARE HERE You have now completed Sub-module 5.1 Control of Food Hazards of Section 2 Applying GMPs after reviewing any supporting documents and links you desire, please proceed to Sub-module 5.3 Incoming Materials Section 2 – sub Module 5.1 - Control of Food Hazards