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North Carolina Department of Correction

North Carolina Department of Correction

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North Carolina Department of Correction

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  1. North CarolinaDepartment of Correction Youth Accountability Planning Task Force System Costs Work Group March 18, 2010

  2. Part 1 An Overview of the Department of Correction

  3. Department of CorrectionBasic Facts • Custody of more than 40,000 inmates • Supervision of approximately 117,000 offenders on probation, parole and post-release • More than 20,000 employees • Presence in all 100 North Carolina counties

  4. Organization and Structure • Administration • Division of Prisons • Correction Enterprises • Division of Alcoholism and Chemical Dependency Programs • Division of Community Corrections

  5. Department of CorrectionOffender Demographics • The Department of Correction supervises: • adult offenders 16 and over • juveniles between the ages of 13 and 15 who have been tried and convicted as adults.

  6. Division of Prisons • Custody and supervision of more than 40,000 inmates in 72 prison facilities across the state • Per 2009 budget, closed six prisons since 07/01/09 • McCain CH will close by April 1, 2010 • Housing, meals, medical and mental health services, general academic education, vocational training and other rehabilitative programs for inmate population • Administration of the death penalty • 158 inmates currently on death row

  7. Correction Enterprises • Uses inmate labor to produce a wide range of products and services for government agencies and nonprofit entities that receive public funding • State employees also can purchase from CE • Provides meaningful work experiences, employment skills and rehabilitative opportunities for inmates • Receives no state appropriation. Instead, like a private business, Correction Enterprises is totally supported through the goods and services it produces and sells.

  8. Division of Alcoholism and Chemical Dependency Programs (DACDP) • Provides comprehensive substance abuse interventions, programs and services to male and female offenders who have alcohol and/or drug problems • Approximately 63 percent of new admissions need residential substance abuse treatment • 1,485 available treatment slots; serves nearly 10,000 inmates annually • Residential treatment for male probationers at DART-Cherry • Program for female probationers expected to admit offenders in April 2010

  9. Division of Community Corrections • Supervision of more than 117,000 convicted offenders serving probation, parole or post-release supervision in the community • Oversight of the Community Service Work Program • Approximately 23,000 offenders • Oversight of Criminal Justice Partnership Program • 84 programs operating in 94 counties

  10. Part 2 Issues Specific to Offenders Under 18 Community Corrections

  11. Division of Community CorrectionsBasic Facts • No policies/procedures specific to offenders under 18 • Offenders under 18 are eligible for most sanctions/programs in DCC • Offenders under 18 are not eligible for residential substance abuse treatment at DART-Cherry • Under 18 must seek treatment from local treatment providers

  12. Offenders on Community Supervision Under Age 18: A Snapshot as of 1/31/2010 • Community Supervision 2,035 • Age 15…………………………………..2 • Age 16…………………………….…377 • Age 17………………………….…1,656

  13. Division of Community CorrectionsUseful Supervision Tools • School Partnership Program • Targets offenders under 21 who are enrolled in public school or local community college • Goal is to ensure compliance by offender and help student obtain GED/adult basic education • Criminal Justice Partnership Program • Community-based programs to support education, substance abuse issues, life skills • Available in 94 counties • Cognitive Behavioral Intervention • Helps offender develop pro-social thinking patterns and problem-solving skills

  14. Part 3 Issues Specific to Offenders Under 18 Prisons

  15. HOUSING YOUNGER OFFENDERSFive Full-Time Academic Schools NOTE: All five schools have DPI-certified instructors and serve students 21 and under • Foothills Correctional Institution (maximum age=25) • NOTE: Close custody only; the minimum custody unit houses only adults • Morrison Correctional Institution (maximum age=25) • NOTE: Minimum custody only; the medium-custody unit houses only adults • North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women (females-no maximum age) • Polk Correctional Institution (maximum age=25) • Western Youth Institution (maximum age=22)

  16. Incarcerated Offenders Under Age 18:A Snapshot as of 1/31/2010 • Incarcerated Offenders 189 • Age 15…………………………….…..3 • Age 16………………………………..16 • Age 17……………………………….170

  17. Western Youth InstitutionBasic Facts • Inmate population of up to 785, with a staff of approximately 400 • Felons ages 13 to 18 and misdemeanants and minimum-custody inmates ages 13 to 22. • High-rise facility built in 1972

  18. Western Youth InstitutionBasic Education • Mandatory academic education for offenders under 18 who do not have a GED • Block system typically allows students to attend academic school for half a day and also have time to work or attend vocational classes. • 21 certified DPI educators in academic school • Exceptional Students Program (Individualized Education Programs for students with disabilities) • School psychologist and school guidance counselor on staff

  19. Western Youth InstitutionEducation, cont. • Part-time GED preparation programs, vocational classes and computer literacy classes through Western Piedmont Community College • Youthful Offender Program (federal grant program through UNC-Asheville that offers post-secondary education, employability skills training, and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention) • Correspondence courses through UNC-Chapel Hill

  20. Western Youth InstitutionSignificant Programs • VOCATIONAL (carpentry, electrical, plumbing, commercial cleaning, horticultural) • SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS (Intermediate Substance Abuse Treatment, Long Term Substance Abuse Treatment, NA, AA) • HUMAN RELATIONS PROGRAM (9-week course designed to inform inmates about topics relating to parenting, relationships, and sexual behaviors) • JOBSTART I (prison-to-work transition project designed to assist participants in securing and retaining employment upon reentering the community) • VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (screens, identifies, and provides rehabilitation services to those inmates with vocational liabilities which interfere with ability to obtain competitive employment)

  21. Western Youth InstitutionMental Health • Staffing: mental health program manager, three full-time staff psychologists, and one part-time psychiatrist • Standard mental health services (mental health screening and individual therapy) • Special Programs • Violent offenders • Young offenders (under age 16) • Developmentally disabled offenders

  22. Part 4 Issues Specific to Offenders Under 18 Costs

  23. Costs of Incarceration PER OFFENDERPer Day Costs By Custody Level (FY 2008-09) • Minimum Custody $59.17 • Medium Custody $76.69 • Close Custody $85.68 • Average Annual Cost $27,000 (est.) • Average Per Day $72.72

  24. Incarcerated Offenders Under 18 • Female offenders under age 18 can be housed at any of the female facilities • Eight (8) female offenders as of 1/31/2010 • NCCIW is only female facility with full-time school • All male inmates 18 and under must be housed at Western Youth Institution unless: • they require inpatient mental health services that can be provided only at Central Prison; • they are assigned to HCON at Polk; or • security or health reasons require a different placement.

  25. Incarcerated Offenders 16 & 17

  26. Incarcerated Offenders – 6/30/09 • Cost Estimates –Age 16 & 17 • Female Offenders 9 • Average Daily Cost $70.92 • Annual Total Cost (est.) $232,972 • Male Offenders (Western) 204 • Average Daily Cost $104.54 • Annual Total Cost (est.) $7.7M

  27. Division of Community CorrectionsAverage Daily Costs (FY 2008-09)

  28. Community Supervision – 6/30/09 • Cost Estimates – Age 16 & 17 • Community Supervision 2,213 • Average Daily Cost $2.49 • Annual Total Costs (est.) $2.0 M

  29. Questions?