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My Science Project: Rock, Paper, Scissors

My Science Project: Rock, Paper, Scissors

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My Science Project: Rock, Paper, Scissors

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  1. My Science Project: Rock, Paper, Scissors By Fiona Dark Science fair, 2014 Ms. Gordon-Smith

  2. My Question Are people more likely to choose rock, paper, or scissors? Does gender have any effect?

  3. Variables For both of my tests, “Are people more likely to choose rock paper or scissors?” and “Does gender have an effect?” (both of which are hard to put in formulaic format, though still have variables) the changed variable will be that I will play with different people. The measured variable will be peoples choice of either rock, paper, or scissors. The variables kept the same will be that I will play once each test with each person, and if for some reason I played more than once with each person, I will only record their first results.

  4. Prediction I think that neither rock, paper, or scissors will be preferred above the others. I think this because I have noticed that some people choose randomly instead of following a logical plan. If they do as I suspect, then there shouldn’t be any preference between rock paper or scissors. I don’t think that gender will effect what they are more likely to choose.

  5. Procedure 1 • To do my first test (Are people more likely to choose rock paper or scissors) : • Play “Rock, paper, scissors!” with a random person, boy or girl. • Repeat step one nine more times, so that I have played ten times in all. • Record their first answers in a ready made graph.

  6. Procedure 2 • To do my second test ( to see if gender has an effect) : • Play “Rock, paper, scissors!” with a random girl. • Repeat step one nine more times, so that I have played ten times in all. • Record their first answers in a ready made graph. • Play “Rock, paper, scissors!” with a random boy. • Repeat step four, nine more times so that I have played ten times in all. • Record their first answers in a ready made graph.

  7. Materials Perhaps unsurprisingly, this project requires no materials but a pencil and paper. Oh, and your hands for playing “Rock, paper, scissors!” while collecting data.

  8. Rock, paper, or scissors?

  9. Gender Effects

  10. Conclusion Girls are more likely to choose scissors, and boys are more likely to choose paper. My evidence is that five out of ten boys chose paper, so 50% of boys chose paper. That’s more than rock or scissors. Six out of ten girls chose scissors, so 60% of girls chose scissors. That’s more than rock or paper. Boys, although they chose paper 50% of the time, also chose rock 40% of the time. Unlike boys, girls had no close runner-up to scissors. This evidence is true because I tested ten boys and ten girls, a reliable number to test. Also, my claim is true because it is supported by my evidence.