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Lifting and Moving

Lifting and Moving

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Lifting and Moving

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  1. Lifting and Moving

  2. Role of the EMR • Sometimes a victim must be rescued from a dangerous situation before care can be given. • Always check a vehicle to stabilize it before providing care. • Always attempt to access the victim in the vehicle by using the simplest approach by trying all doors and windows first. • Always ensure your safety • Wear protective equipment, such as a helmet, gloves, and protective eyewear, to keep you safe. • Several methods of moving a victim can be done simply and with little danger to you or the victim. • Sometimes you may have to use/assist EMS personnel in lifting and moving.

  3. Body Mechanics/Lifting Techniques • Basic Guidelines for Moving Victims • Only move a victim you can safely handle. • Move as close to his/her body as possible • Bend at knees and hips • Lift with your legs, not your back • Take short steps • Move forward when possible • Look where you are walking • Protect victim’s head, neck, and back. • Communicate with helpers

  4. General Considerations for Moving a Victim • The extent of damage at the scene • The size of the victim(s) • Your physical ability • Whether other help is available • The victim’s condition • Threat to life • When in doubt, keep stabilized at the accident site until EMS personnel arrive

  5. General Considerations for Moving a Victim • Situations that might require you to move a victim before providing care • Immediate danger to rescuer or victim • Access to a more seriously injured victim • You must move victim to provide proper care

  6. Emergency Moves • Fire fighters carry • Conscious and unconscious patients – dangerous situation • Clothes drag • Good for head and neck injuries • Blanket drag • Good for head and neck – move quickly • Shoulder drag • Grasps the victims forearms and drag • Pack-strap carry • Conscious and unconscious patients • Keep arms crossed in front of your body • May require a second rescuer • Never pull the victim’s head away from the neck and shoulders

  7. Non-urgent Moves • Direct lift • May use more than 1 rescuer • Support neck if possible • Extremity lift • Requires 2 rescuers • Direct carry • Stretcher and bed • Draw sheet method

  8. Victim Positioning • An unresponsive victim without trauma should be moved into the recovery position. • A victim with trauma should not be moved until additional EMS resources arrive. • A victim with pain, discomfort, or difficulty breathing should be allowed to assume a position of comfort. • EMRs should be ready to manage the victim’s airway.

  9. Familiarity with Equipment • Stretchers and cots • Portable stretchers • Stair chairs • Long and Short backboards

  10. Key Points • Need to determine the risk of injury to the patient and make a rationale decision on which move is the most appropriate • When there is NO threat to the victim, DO NOT move • Practice these every so often, so that you do not get rusty

  11. Skill Practice: Emergency Moves • Bring your skill sheets to the practice area • Get in groups of 3 • Practice a walking assist, pack strap carry, two-person seat carry, and clothes drag

  12. Assignment • Review Chapters 1-6 in the textbook • Review workbook Units 1-6 • Complete Assessment Exercise #1 dealing with Chapters 1-6