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Agree or Disagree

Agree or Disagree

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Agree or Disagree

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  1. Agree or Disagree • The Japanese-American internment camps are similar to the concentration camps used during the Holocaust. • Please state whether you agree or disagree and explain why. • Discuss your response with your face partner!

  2. Japanese- American Internment Camps during World War II

  3. Vocabulary • Internment-To place in confinement (to shut or keep in), especially in wartime

  4. Map of Internment Camps

  5. How it started • February 19th 1942: Executive Order 9066 moved 120,000 Japanese Americans from their homes into internment camps. • The US justified their action by claiming there was a danger of Japanese Americans spying for Japan • More than 2/3 of those interned were American citizens and 1/2 of them were children. • Some family members were separated and put in different camps.

  6. Coming to the camps

  7. What was it like to live there? • Life in the camps was hard. • The families had about 2 days to pack for the camps • They were only were allowed to bring what they could carry • They were housed in barracks and had to use communal areas for washing, laundry and eating.

  8. What did the Japanese Americans do while in the camps?

  9. School Time

  10. How did it end? • January 1945 : the Public Proclamation 21 became effective in which allowed internees to return to their homes. • At the end of the war some remained in the US and rebuilt their lives • Others were unforgiving and returned to Japan

  11. Were the internment camps necessary? • None of the people interned had ever previously shown disloyalty to the United States. • During the entire war only ten people were convicted of spying for Japan • The ten people were all Caucasian.