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Digital Citizenship Advisory Committee for SSB 6273

Digital Citizenship Advisory Committee for SSB 6273

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Digital Citizenship Advisory Committee for SSB 6273

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  1. Digital Citizenship Advisory Committee for SSB 6273 SECOND Meeting – SEPTEMBER 28, 2016 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  2. Today’s Agenda • Introductions • “Mini case studies” on: • Addressing Media Literacy at Seattle Prep • Addressing Digital Citizenship at East Valley SD (Spokane) • WSSDA Model Board Policy Development • Digital Citizenship and Media Literacy definition development • Report on Workgroups: • Elementary curriculum • Middle school & high school curriculum Lunch on your own • Report on Workgroups: • Family resources • District policy work • Educator training (including teachers, staff, and school leaders) • Initial recommendations for legislative report • Next steps, future schedule OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  3. Mini-Case Study #1: Addressing Media Literacy at Seattle Prep MICHAEL DANIELSON, Media Literacy Teacher/Ed Tech Director, SEATTLE PREPARATORY SCHOOL OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  4. Media Literacy Definition: 5 Vowels "It is no longer enough to simply read and write. Students must also become literate in the understanding of visual images. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliché, and distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter and important news from coverage."
 Ernest BoyerFormer president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1988 Media Literacy is the ability to: Analyze – What is it and how was it created? Evaluate– What value does it contribute? Interpret– What does it mean? Organize– How can students contribute to the discussion? Understand– What does it mean and what are the effects? the media. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  5. ”The medium is the message” – Marshall McLuhanMedia Literacy: 5 Core Concepts of the Media • 1 - All media are constructions • “it’s not real” • 2 - All media use special techniques and “languages” • what techniques are used? (lighting, music, CGI, etc) • 3 - All media mean different things to different people • how might different demographics respond? • 4 - All media have values messages and Point of View • what values are being presented? what is the POV? • 5 - All media are used for profit and/or power • what were the motives of the producers? • CENTER FOR MEDIA LITERACY – MEDIALIT.ORG OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  6. ”The medium is the message” – Marshall McLuhanMedia Literacy: UNITS • 1 – “Think before you post!” Digital Citizenship • Your future is at stake, Responsible use of digital tools, Generation Like (PBS) • 2 – “Just Do It” – Consumerism & The Three Tasks of the Adman • What are they REALLY selling? Data mining and Neuromarketing • 3 – “Wait, What?” – Stereotypes and Sexism • The Selling of Gender / News, Politics and Propaganda • 4 – “How did they do that?” – Deconstructing Movies and More • Special and not so special effects / • 5 – “It’s your turn” – PSA Project • Make a video that says something – • Cyberbullying, screen addiction, market stalkers, • brand loyalty, product placement, micro targeting • Vote “best tag line” & “best overall PSA” OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  7. VIDEO Resources CONSUMING KIDS – Branding and targeting of children, tweens and teens (MEF) KILLING US SOFTLY – Subtle and blatant sexist stereotyping in advertising (MEF) TERMS &CONDITIONS MAY APPLY - Consumers’ loss of privacy to corporations & govt (ROCO) GREATEST MOVIE EVER SOLD – Use of product placement throughout the media (Spurlock) THIS IS MEDIA – Creative and comprehensive overview of all types of media (PIVOT, NAMLE) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  8. Mini-Case Study #2: Addressing Digital Citizenship at East Valley SD (Spokane) Cari Roderick, K-12 Coordinator of Assessment and Instructional Technology, East Valley SD (SPOKANE) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  9. K-8 Curriculum • Instructional Resources: • Common Sense Media • Netsmartz • Other online sources • Formative Assessment • Nearpod • Kahoot • Summative Assessment • Student Projects • OSPI Developed Ed Tech & Social Studies Integrated Assessments K-8 Digital Citizenship Scope & Sequence Click here for sample OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  10. Lesson Samples Bubble.us Brainstorming Posters Poems Research Notes Safe & Respectful Online Profile PowerPoint OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  11. EVSD Internet Safety Student Mentors • 6th -12th grade student leaders • Selected through applications and recommendations • Learn how to be safe and responsible digital citizens • Focus: Cyberbullying, Social Networking, Sexting, Online Predators, Protecting your identity, Gaming, and overall respectful & positive behaviors • Develop & find resources for peers, elementary students, teachers, and community • Create and facilitate presentations & activities for peers, elementary students, teachers, and community https://www.isafe.org/outreach/youth OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  12. Student Mentor Activities Wall of Intolerance Our Student Body Stands Up #PositivePostItDay #Startswithus OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  13. Student Mentor Activities Respect & Kindness Chain Reaction Stop Texting & Driving Posters Sexting Card Activity Lunch Table Info & Surveys OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  14. Educating Staff, Parents, & Community • Signs & Consequences of Cyberbullying • Consequences of Sexting • Think Before you Post! • Protecting Privacy • Promoting Positive & Respectful Social Networking • Monitoring Students’ Digital Connections • Popular Apps & Websites EVSD Internet Safety Web Page http://www.evsd.org/pages/EVSD/Parents___Students/For_Parents/Internet_Safety_Resources Community Support OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  15. Mini-Case Study #3: WSSDA Model Board Policy Development Heidi Maynard, Director, Policy and Legal Services, Washington State School Directors’ Association (WSSDA) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  16. What is WSSDA? • The Washington State School Directors’ Association was founded in 1922 • Authorized as a state agency by RCW 28A.345.010to coordinate “programs and procedures pertaining to policymaking and to control and management among the school districts of the state…” • Currently comprised of all 1,477 school board members • Located in Olympia; 16 employees • Major functions: Provides policy and legal guidance, advocacy, and leadership development for school board directors and districts. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  17. The WSSDA Model Policy Manual The WSSDA Model Policy Manual currently contains: • 414 policies and procedures(269 policies/145 procedures) Six Series: • 1000 – The Board of Directors • 2000 – Instruction • 3000 – Students • 4000 – Community Relations • 5000 – Personnel • 6000 – Management Support OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  18. WSSDA model policies address…well, for starters: OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  19. Why is policy important? Policy is the process by which the school board governs the district. It impacts: • The district’s legal duties owed to staff and students • Student and staff safety • The learning environment • Relationships (e.g., board and superintendent, district and community) • Risk management • Litigation • SAO Audits • OSPI Federal Consolidated Program Review • Federal OCR complaints/investigations/resolution agreements OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  20. Once adopted, what does effective policy and procedure look like? • Legally compliant • Customized to suit individual district needs • Procedure (often delegated to the superintendent) reflects the board’s goal(s) as stated in the policy • Recognizes current district resource restraints (e.g., training) • Aligned with all other district policies • Regularly reviewed to ensure practice reflects purpose. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  21. 2008 K-12 State EdTech Standards • The K-12 Educational Technology Learning Standards (2008) are categorized around two EALRs: • Integration - Students use technology within all content areas to collaborate, communicate, generate innovative ideas, investigate, and solve problems; and • Digital Citizenship - Students demonstrate a clear understanding of technology systems and operations, and practice safe, legal, and ethical behavior. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  22. ISTE Standards for 2016 1. Empowered Learner Students leverage technology to take an active role in choosing, achieving and demonstrating competency in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences. 2. Digital Citizen Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal and ethical. 3. Knowledge Constructor Students critically curate a variety of resources using digital tools to construct knowledge, produce creative artifacts and make meaningful learning experiences for themselves and others. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  23. ISTE Standards for 2016 4. Innovative Designer Students use a variety of technologies within a design process to identify and solve problems by creating new, useful or imaginative solutions. 5. Computational Thinker Students develop and employ strategies for understanding and solving problems in ways that leverage the power of technological methods to develop and test solutions. 6. Creative Communicator Students communicate clearly and express themselves creatively for a variety of purposes using the platforms, tools, styles, formats and digital media appropriate to their goals. 7. Global Collaborator Students use digital tools to broaden their perspectives and enrich their learning by collaborating with others and working effectively in teams locally and globally. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  24. ISTE Standards for 2016 – Digital Citizen Standard statement: Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act in ways that are safe, legal, ethical and self-aware.  • Standards performance indicators: • a. Students take advantage of the benefits of technology to seek, create and share, while also remaining physically and psychologically healthy.b. Students actively cultivate a positive digital identity and reputation, engage in positive social interactions in virtual spaces and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world.c. Students foster a culture of respect for intellectual property, their own and others’, by understanding the rights and obligations of using and sharing works, including gaining or giving permissions as needed and appropriately documenting sources.d. Students recognize that data is collected and tracked as they navigate online; they proactively manage personal data to maintain digital privacy & security & are aware that automated personalization can reduce diversity of viewpoints & knowledge. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  25. ISTE Standards for 2016 – Knowledge Constructor • Standard Statement: Students critically curate a variety of resources using digital tools to construct knowledge, produce creative artifacts and make meaningful learning experiences for themselves and others. • Standards performance indicators: • a. Students plan and employ effective research strategies to locate information and other resources for their intellectual or creative pursuits. • b. Students evaluate the accuracy, perspective, credibility and relevance of information, media, data or other resources. • c. Students curate information from digital resources using a variety of tools and methods to create collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful connections or conclusions. • d. Students build knowledge by actively exploring real-world issues and problems, developing ideas and theories and pursuing answers and solutions. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  26. Definitional Language from SSB 6273 • “Digital citizenship" includes the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior related to current technology use, including digital and media literacy, ethics, etiquette, and security. The term also includes the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, develop, produce, and interpret media, as well as internet safety and cyberbullying prevention and response. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  27. Definition: Digital Citizenship • Digital citizenship includes the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior related to current technology use, including digital and media literacy, ethics, etiquette, and security. Also includes internet safety and cyberbullying prevention and response. OR: • Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act in ways that are safe, legal, ethical and self-aware.  OR: The ability for students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. OR: Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  28. Definition: Media Literacy • Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create, and act using all forms of communication. • OR: • Media Literacy is defined as the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and produce communication in a variety of forms. • OR: • Media Literacy is the ability to ask questions about what a person watches, sees and reads. • OR: • The ability to access, analyze, evaluate, produce, and interpret media. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  29. Workgroups: Elementary Curriculum • “I would never let my toddler play in the front yard until she learned about the safety rules of playing near the street, I would never let my teenager drive a car without being by their side to show them how to navigate the road, and it is equally as important to teach and guide our children along the way as they interact in a digital world.” OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  30. Workgroups: Elementary Curriculum • Over the last couple of years, I've been collaborating with our school's counselors to insure that there is coherence between the Digital Citizenship curriculum and the Social-Emotional curriculum that our school (and district) uses. In my experience, using the same terms for problems, strategies, and behaviors in both digital and in-person behaviors can be very beneficial for both students and staff. It's also provided me with very valuable insights into behavior, motivation, and strategies for education, rather than punishment, when mistakes occur! OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  31. Workgroups: Elementary Curriculum • I have used: NetSmartz Teens (MS/HS); iKeepSafe Kids (Elem); NetSmartz Kids (Elem); Media Smarts Teacher Resources (Elem/MS/HS). All had resources that could be pulled out and used independently, but I didn't think they could be confused with a stand alone curriculum.   OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  32. Workgroups: Elementary Curriculum • Common Sense Media is the only place we found that offered a full K-12 curriculum with all the resources teachers need to teach the lessons without completely writing everything from scratch.  It is easy to use, offers a myriad of optional lessons and resources to support the concepts... everything at your fingertips.  It isn't too "cutesy" and stays realistic.  No scare tactics either.  All the lessons we are using also include a handout for students to take home to continue the discussion there as well.  OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  33. Workgroups: Elementary Curriculum • Another resource used is Netsmartz, along with games in Common Sense with the elementary age students. RADCAB is another good, free resource, which has been used for 3rd, 4th and 5th graders. This resource offers helpful strategies and ideas for encouraging students to question the information they’re finding. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  34. Workgroups: MS/HS Curriculum For our district, Commonsense media has been the most helpful as it is fairly comprehensive and shows a k-12 sensibility. However, some of the lessons merit adjustment/modification in part due to time constraints or even student interest. What I find problematic, even with the better websites, is that they quickly become dated and students quickly turn off if something comes across as canned or out of touch with their current use of technology. The videos in Netsmartz, while well intentioned, come across as pretty hokey as do some of the ones in Common sense. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  35. Workgroups: MS/HS Curriculum Using the Bystander Revolution website with middle school students. This, according to descriptions provided “ is an online resource offering practical, crowdsourced advice about simple things individuals can do to take the power out of bullying.” The website references lots of good videos on YouTube. It also features celebrities; students relate to these people. The site addresses not only how to stand up to a bully but also examines forgiveness, reconciliation, and mending relationships. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  36. Workgroups: MS/HS Curriculum • We have tried some different strategies with schools such as presenting material during orientation days when at times there is a space to fill in the program for the day. There are definitely different strategies that need to be tried. One district school had a Digital Citizenship Day. Another idea is to have the students sign a digital citizenship pledge. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  37. Workgroups: MS/HS Curriculum • How can we provide authentic assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their mastery of concepts or skills? • Some of our staff incorporate current events. Seeing real world examples in context can be very powerful. Also doing some work around multiple perspectives can help to make connections. There is a common sense media lesson that has students look at student profiles from the perspective of an employer or school admissions.  OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  38. Workgroups: MS/HS Curriculum • How do we encourage students to think critically and identify bias in media? • By providing students with a framework to begin thinking about media in a new way, and making it personal and relevant to them. For example, tailoring a lesson to 7th grade girls on body image and presenting them with magazines, giving them good framing questions and then challenging them to peruse magazines targeted to their demographic and discover different examples that support their positions.  OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  39. Workgroups: Family Resources • How can we help families have knowledge of and access to the most up-to-date evidence base and evidence-based resources regarding media literacy and digital citizenship? • This needs to be imparted to them in small, understandable chunks. Resources are only good when they are not overwhelming. If we can find a way to present the resources and items in a way that empowers families but also doesn't overwhelm us as educators then we can succeed. Again, a website, toolkit, mailing, or something that condenses all the important information into several, digestible options would be best. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  40. Workgroups: Family Resources • How can we ensure training for all families? • I think offering regular workshops, that can be held at the school, libraries or other community locations that give tools and real time tips, or print/online materials that families can regularly receive will help families to get trained and brought up to speed on terminology, apps and current trends. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  41. Workgroups: Family Resources • How do we ensure inclusiveness in our communications with families and community members? • Whatever digital or print materials, as well as available classes or lessons, should ideally be offered in multiple languages or with translation. This can be done in conjunction with community organizations and partners. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  42. Workgroups: District Policy Work • How do we ensure that student voice (including recent graduates) and family and community input into policies is included in the process? • I believe strongly that the students in our schools today are significantly different in their digital knowledge and attitudes than those that came 10 years before them. Before we develop any guidelines about digital citizenship and leadership, we need to engage and understand our audience. Focus groups, surveys, research...we need to examine what our current students know, fear and understand, not what we think they do. Otherwise, we're going to miss our mark. Parents have a range of attitudes about digital citizenship. We similarly need to understand them better. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  43. Workgroups: District Policy Work • How do we focus on digital citizenship and leadership while addressing the importance of online safety practice? • These are not mutually-exclusive. It's about tone, context and the framing of the question or challenge. It seems as if much of the digital citizenship content is framed around a fixed mindset rather than a growth mindset. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  44. Workgroups: District Policy Work • How do we keep the focus on educational opportunities rather than fear? • All of the guiding questions here seem to hinge upon a central theme of cultural change.  Without a significant shift in how we deal with technology and the opportunities it brings, there will always be a contingent of folk who emphasize the ills of technology over the possibilities.  As teachers and administrators become more and more overwhelmed with all of the demands on their time, there is little left for a focus on how technology can enhance what their doing and even create efficiencies in their work. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  45. Workgroups: Educator Training • Another big issue to consider is that when trainings are given, it’s important not only to provide a good overview for everyone but also to then include in your training plan the opportunity for follow-through with the participants. Teachers have to be shown how to integrate the material into the subject areas they are currently required to teach. “Teachers have so much coming at them. How do I use this training?” OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  46. Workgroups: Educator Training • How do we ensure that adults understand and model responsible use and digital leadership? • 1. Clear standards and definitions that are easily found on a website • 2. Clear connections made with learning in all areas-- a rationale. • 3. Model the digital literacy standards in the professional development. • 4. Provide multiple training opportunities in a number of formats from face to face to online. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  47. Workgroups: Educator Training 5. Create user-friendly materials for staff meetings, PLCs etc. for discussions that do more that explain the standards. For example brief case studies for discussion, interactive online activity, etc. • 6. Examples of what this looks like in different classes at different levels. • 7. Action research or formal research on impact on student learning. • 8. Administrator one-pager of what this would look like in a classroom or school. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  48. Ideas & Suggestions • Need for districts to share information. OSPI needs to take the lead role in coordinating this interaction. “We need to be brought together to brainstorm, learn from each other and get new ideas.” The ESDs are one avenue to pursue. It’s difficult to get people from around the state to come to Olympia. Other states that have a model similar to our ESDs have had some success in using these types of entities to facilitate interaction. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  49. Ideas & Suggestions • Bringing thought leaders to our state to help provide a broader vision of possibilities. We would benefit from learning what other states are doing. There are many other states that are ahead of us, and these individuals possibly could direct us to areas that could serve as excellent models. • US Department of Ed: Richard Culatta • Privacy Tech Advisory Committee (PTAC.ed.gov): Baron Rodriguez • COSN: Keith Kruger OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  50. Ideas & Suggestions • While other recommendations may soon come to mind, the foremost one I can think of is that media and digital citizenship are changing/expanding/ growing at a rapid pace, and whatever techniques or ideas put in place to educate youth/families/adults around them must be done with this in mind. Being nimble and able to address consistently evolving ideas is a must for whatever materials/items are put in place. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION