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Quartz PowerPoint Presentation

Quartz

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Quartz

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  1. Quartz by-nc-nd: Orbital Joe by-nc: Travis S.

  2. With few exceptions, most early stone tools were fashioned of quartz. by-nc-sa: keepps by: Yandle by-nc-nd: Western Sahara Project by-nc-sa: mharrsch

  3. Quartz is in igneous and metamorphic rocks. by-nc-sa: Ron Schott by-nc: smiling_da_vinci by-nc-nd: xrichx by-nc-sa: Ron Schott by-nc-sa: Monceau

  4. Quartz is in the sediments sand and silt, by-nc-nd: Phil Romans by-nc-nd: Jason Abbott by: fatal Cleopatra

  5. the sedimentary rocks sandstone and siltstone, by-sa: Shital Shah by-nc: Simonds

  6. as well as their metamorphosed equivalents of quartzite and slate. by: cogdogblog by-nc-sa: dewo

  7. ‘Chert’ is a term collectively used for all the quartz varieties that have crystals too small to be seen without a microscope. Chert color varieties are: onyx (mixed white and black), here with rose quartz by-nc-nd: Helmetti jasper (red to red-brown) by-nc-sa: Wessex Archaeolog by-nc-nd: Narisa flint (gray to black)

  8. by-nc: chrissam42 by-nc: Terrie Weng Chert precipitated from silica-rich groundwater can replace bone and wood present in sediment and sedimentary rocks by-nc: Ottoman42

  9. tiger’s eye by-nc-nd: Orbital Joe by-nc-nd: oldbones by-nc-nd: Helmetti opal: rough and polished rose quartz chalcedony Quartz by other names: amethyst by-nc-sa: jspace3 citrine agate by-nc-nd: Future-PhD. by-nc-nd: oldbones by: jaja_1985

  10. Historically, the single most important use of quartz may have been to start fires. by-sa: matthewvenn When chert is struck against iron, it produces a relatively long-lived spark. by: westy559

  11. Quartz is in building stones. by-nd: mike.wilson by-nc-sa: Ben McLeod by-nc-sa: rowlock by-nc-sa: mharrsch

  12. Quartz is mixed with clay and ground-up feldspar, and then fired to form a wide range of ceramic and porcelain products. by-nc: bombelek by-sa: Ebua Libana by-nc-sa: amortize by-nc: birdfarm

  13. Quartz is used in the manufacture of glass by-nc-sa: Rob Ireton by-nd: savinca by-sa: bongo vongo by-nc-sa: dachalan by-nc-nd: gsgeorge

  14. Quartz is often in concrete and asphalt as aggregate and sand. by-sa: crouchingbadger by-nc-nd: Orbital Joe by-nc-sa: PPDIGITAL by-nc-sa: portfolium

  15. by-sa: Southern_Comfort Quartz is used as a flux for metallurgy. A flux is a material that melts easily and can be used to remove impurities from metal ores, or that makes the slag produced by metal ore smelting more fluid. by-nc-sa: BBColin

  16. Many species of marine plankton, called diatoms, construct their shells of quartz. As these microscopic organisms die, they sink down to cover the deep sea floor with layers of porous diatom shells. USGS Ancient deep sea diatom deposits now exposed at the Earth’s surface are called diatomaceous earth. by-nc-sa: Adrian Barnes Diatomaceous earth is the abrasive part of toothpaste. Since it is composed of quartz, the shells are harder than the apatite and calcite minerals that make up our teeth. When you polish your teeth, you actually are grinding the surface down with a very fine abrasive, often the shells of long dead plankton. by-nc-sa: Leo Reynolds

  17. Quartz is the abrasive in stonecutting, sandblasting, and scouring soaps by-nc-nd: lobstar28 by-nc-nd: CheriGaulke by-nc-sa: Merrick Brown

  18. Pure quartz crystals are piezoelectric – that means that when put under pressure, the crystal produces an electric voltage. by-nc-nd: jwinfred This characteristic allows quartz crystals to be used to measure pressures or control the frequency of electric impulses, which led to their use in radio systems and timepieces. by-sa: threedots

  19. by-nc-nd: Mundoo by: RickC Quartz can be a host rocks for gold and other precious metals. by-nc: Ifn

  20. Quartz by-nc-nd: Orbital Joe by-nc: Travis S.

  21. Our notation description public domain (none) Creative Commons Licenses by by-sa by-nc-sa by-nd by-nc-nd GNUGNU Free Documentation License © Copyright. All rights reserved media rights Many of the photos in this presentation were obtained through Flickr and Wikipedia. Funded by FIPSE and by the University of Minnesota. Compiled for Dr. Kent Kirkby, Department of Geology and Geophysics, by Kate Rosok, 2007. Each displayed image retains its original media rights. For educational purposes only; not to be used commercially.