Download
high performance computing n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
High Performance Computing PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
High Performance Computing

High Performance Computing

1 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

High Performance Computing

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. High Performance Computing Architecture Overview Computational Methods Computational Methods

  2. Outline • Desktops, servers and computational power • Clusters and interconnects • Supercomputer architecture and design • Future systems Computational Methods

  3. What is available on your desktop? • Intel Core i7 4790 (Haswell) processor • 4 cores at 4.0 GHz • 8 double precision floating point operations per second (FLOP/s) – full fused multiply add instructions (FMAs) • 2 floating point units (FPUs) per core • 16 FLOP per cycle • FMA example: $0 = $0 x $2 + $1 • 64 GFLOP/s per core theoretical peak • 256 GFLOP/s full system theoretical peak Computational Methods

  4. What can a desktop do? • Central difference • 1-d corresponds to 1 subtraction (1 FLOP), 1 multiplication (1 FLOP), 1 division (4 FLOPs) • Single 1-d grid with 512 zones = 3072 FLOPs Computational Methods

  5. What can a desktop do? • Consider central difference on a 5123 3-d mesh • 5123x 3 surfaces = 2.4 GFLOPs • On a single core of a 4.0 GHz Core i7 • 0.03 seconds of run time for 1 update with 100% efficiency (assumes 100% fused multiply add instructions) • With perfect on-chip parallelization on 4cores • 0.008 seconds per update • 1.25 minutes for 10,000 updates • Nothing, not even HPL, gets 100% efficiency! • A more realistic efficiency is ~10% Computational Methods

  6. Efficiency considerations • No application ever gets 100% of theoretical peak for the following, not comprehensive, reasons • 100% peak assumes 100% FMA instructions running on processors with AVX SIMD instructions. Does the algorithm in question even map well to FMAs? If not, the rest of vector instructions are 50% of FMA peak. • Data must be moved from main memory through the CPU memory system. This motion has latency and a fixed bandwidth that may be shared with other cores. • The algorithm may not map well into vector instructions at all. The code is then “serial” and runs at 1/8th of peak if optimal. • The application may require I/O, which can be very expensive and stall computation. This alone can take efficiency down by an order of magnitude in some cases. Computational Methods

  7. More realistic problem • Consider numerical hydrodynamics • Updating 5 variables • Computing wave speeds, solving eigenvalue problem, computing numerical fluxes • Roughly 1000 FLOPs per zone per update in 3d • 134 GFLOPs per update for 5123 zones • Runs take on order of hundreds of 14 hours on 4 cores at 10% efficiency • 8 Bytes * 5123 * 5 variables = 5 GB Computational Methods

  8. Consider these simulations… • Numerical MHD, ~6K FLOPs per zone per update • 12K time steps • 1088 x 448 x 1088 grid = 530 million zones • 3.2 TFLOPs per update = 38 PFLOPs for the full calculation • ~17 days on Haswell desktop (wouldn’t even fit in memory anyway) • Actual simulation was run on MSI Itasca system using 2,032 Nehalem cores (6X less FLOP/s per core) for 6 hours • color.avi Computational Methods

  9. HPC Clusters • Group of servers connected with a dedicated high-speed network • Mesabi at the MSI • 741 servers (or nodes) • Built by HP with Infiniband network from Mellanox • 2.5 GHz, 12 core Haswell server processors • 2 sockets per node • 960 GFLOP/s per node theoretical peak • 711 TFLOP/s total system theoretical peak Computational Methods

  10. Intel Haswell 12 core server chip • From cyberparse.co.uk Computational Methods

  11. HPC Clusters • Goal is to have network fast enough to ignore… why? • All cores ideally are “close” enough to appear to be on one machine • Keep the problem FLOP (or at least node) limited as much as possible • Intel offers • Bandwidth: ~68 GB/s from memory across 12 cores (depends on memory speed) • Latency: ~12 cycles (order of tens of nanoseconds) • EDR Infiniband offers • Bandwidth: 100 Gb/s = 12.5 GB/s • Latency: Varies on topology and location in network (~1-10 microseconds) Computational Methods

  12. HPC Clusters • Network types • Infiniband • FDR, EDR, etc • Ethernet • Up to 10 GB/s bandwidth • Cheaper than Infiniband but also slower • Custom • Cray, IBM, Fujitsu, for example, all have custom networks (not “vanilla” clusters though) Computational Methods

  13. Network Topology • Layout of connections between servers in a cluster • Latency and often bandwidth are best for pairs of servers “closer” in the network • Network is tapered providing less bandwidth at Level 2 routers • Example: dual fat tree for SGI Altix system from www.csm.ornl.gov Computational Methods

  14. Supercomputers • What’s the difference from a cluster? • Distinction is a bit subjective • Presented as a single system (or mainframe) to the user • Individual servers are stripped down to absolute basics • Typically cannot operate as independent computer from the rest of the system Computational Methods

  15. Cray XC40 Node AMD Packages Computational Methods

  16. Cray XC40 Topology Computational Methods

  17. Cray XC40 System • Trinity system at Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Methods

  18. Trinity • Provides mission critical computing to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) • Currently #6 on Top500.org November 2015 list • Phase 1 is ~9600 XC40 Haswell nodes (dual socket, 16 cores per socket) • ~307,000 cores • Theoretical peak of ~11 PFLOP/s • Phase 2 is ~9600 XC KNL nodes (single socket, > 60 cores per socket) • Theoretical peak of ~18 PFLOP/s in addition to 11 PFLOP/s from Haswell nodes (just an conservative estimate, exact number cannot be released yet) • 80 Petabytes of near-line storage • Cray Sonexionlustre • Draws up to 10 MW at peak utilization! Computational Methods

  19. Accelerators and Many Integrated Cores • Typical CPUs are not very energy efficient • Meant to be general purpose, which requires lots of pieces to the chip • Accelerators package much more FLOP capabilities with less energy consumption • Not exactly general purpose • Always requires more work from the programmer • Performance improvements and application porting may take significant effort Computational Methods

  20. Accelerators • GPUs as accelerators • NVIDIA GPUs can be used to perform calculations • Latest Kepler generation offer ~1.4 TFLOP/s in a single package Computational Methods

  21. Cray XC GPU Node NVIDIA K20X Computational Methods

  22. Cray XC GPU System • Pix Daint at CSCS (#7 on Top500.org November 2015 list) Computational Methods

  23. Petascale and Beyond • Current Top500 systems (mention usual complaint about Top500 metric here) Computational Methods

  24. Petascale and Beyond • The next step is “exascale.” • In the US, the only near exascale systems are part of the DOE Coral project • Cray + Intel are building Aurora • KNH + new interconnect from Intel based on Cray Aries interconnect • ~ 180 PFLOP/s • IBM + NVIDIA are building Summit and Sierra • nVidia GPUs + Power CPUs • No precise performance estimate available (anywhere from 100-300 PFLOP/s) Computational Methods

  25. Petascale and Beyond • These systems will vet MIC and GPUs as possible technologies to Exascale • Both have their risks, and neither may end up getting us there • Alternative technologies being investigated as part of DOE funded projects • ARM (yes, cell phones have ARM, but that version of ARM will NOT be used in HPC probably ever) • Both nVidia and Intel have DOE funded projects on GPUs and MIC • FPGAs (forget it unless something revolutionary happens with that technology) • “Quantum” computers • D-Wave systems are quantum-like analog computers able to solve exactly one class of problems that fit into minimization by annealing. These systems will NEVER be useful for forecasting the weather or simulating any physics. • True quantum gates are being developed but are not scalable right now. This technology may be decades off yet. Computational Methods

  26. Programming • Tomorrow will be a very brief overview of how one programs a supercomputer. •  Computational Methods