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Behavior Intervention Case Manager (BICM) Certification Training
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Behavior Intervention Case Manager (BICM) Certification Training

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  1. Behavior Intervention Case Manager (BICM) Certification Training Presented by: Roger Hammond, Credentialed School Psychologist 1

  2. Behavior Plan Practicum:Developing and Scoring High Quality Behavior Plans Co-Developed By: Diana Browning Wright & Dru Saren 2

  3. Who am I? 3

  4. And who are you? 4

  5. Objectives Understand • BICM Certification requirements • The Regulations pertaining to Behavioral Interventions for Special Needs students • The process for developing compliant and effective Positive Behavior Support Plans • The process for conducting an FAA • The role of the BICM in developing Positive Behavior Intervention Plans and supporting the IEP team 5

  6. Agenda: • See handout 6

  7. The Regulations • Behavioral Assessment • Functional Analysis Assessment (FAA) • Serious Behavior Problems and Behavioral Emergency Procedures • Role of the BICM and IEP Team

  8. Decision Making • See flow sheets- Behavior Plans in California

  9. Underlying Principles and Foundations • Behavior Support Plan • Why? It’s the Law It is best practice It improves outcomes It increases staff morale

  10. IDEA 2004 • Behavior impeding learning of student or peers • Strategies, including positive behavioral interventions, strategies and support • Public agency shall ensure that each teacher and provider is informed of their specific responsibilities to accommodate, modify and support…. • 45 day school placement: services to be sure behavior doesn’t reoccur 9

  11. Behavior Support Plans • For whom? Any student who needs one! 11

  12. Behavior Support Plans • Who makes up the team? Everyone relevant to the implementation 12

  13. What Behavior Support Plans? • Positive Behavior Support Plans (PBSP): Developed when behavior is “impeding learning” • Positive Behavior Intervention Plans(PBIP): Developed when there is “serious behavior” which includes • Assaultive • Self-injurious • Serious property damage • Other pervasive maladaptive behavior 13

  14. Behavior Support Plans • Remember California’s Ed Code on behavior for students with disabilities • We must also use all 4 Faa/pbip forms when: • the IEP team says the behavior is “serious” • a BICM has supervised or conducted an FAA • a PBIP is recommended • See section 9 for the forms 14

  15. Coversheet – Section 1: 16

  16. 17 Three Options for Using the BSP-R 1. IDEA/504 - Use the BSP as an attachment The BSP is used to designate the positive behavioral supports required when “behavior is impeding learning” under Federal I.D.E.A. This BSP attaches to an IEP or 504 plan for students with exceptional needs.

  17. Three Options for Using the BSP-R 2. Best Practices-Student Assistance Teams - Use the BSP as a stand-alone The BSP is used by the student assistance team to designate the positive behavioral supports for any student with behavior support needs. This BSP attaches to any team notes to be given to implementers. 18

  18. 19 Use BSP-R as the “Core” Behavior Plan 3. High documentation required: e.g., California’s FAA and PBIP, California Requirement - Combine with other 3 Sections The Core Behavior Plan combines with the other 3 sections to become a complete FAA-PBIP that complies with California Ed. Code for “serious behavior” “Serious” behavior is defined in CA Ed. Code as: - Assaultive - Self- injurious - Severe property damage - Other Pervasive, Maladaptive Behavior

  19. Grounding Principle • NO intervention will work if implementers don’t genuinely care about the student & the student believes that. • Implementers must show they care for the student or no behavior plan will work. 20

  20. Behavior Support Plans • Focus on… SUPPORT vs. Management 21

  21. Behavior Support Plans • Focus on… FUNCTION vs. Consequences 22

  22. Behavior Support Plans • Focus on… ANTECEDENTS vs. Consequences 23

  23. Behavior Support Plans • Focus on… TEACHING vs. Controlling 24

  24. 25 QUALITY BSPs • All effective plans address both the environment and the function of the behavior • Change environments to eliminate the need to use this behavior • Teach alternative, acceptable (replacement) behaviors which allow student to get or reject something.

  25. 26 Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide • Use to train staff on the key concepts of applied behavioral analysis

  26. Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide • Use to improve the quality of BSPs AS they are being written 27

  27. Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide • Use when a BSP has not been successful. 28

  28. Multiple Purposes of a Scoring Guide • Use to keep proper focus balance between positive behavioral interventions and potential future disciplinary considerations. 29

  29. Symbols • Let’s review what the BSP should embody to achieve Positive Behavioral Support: principles key concepts requirements methods 30

  30. What ISthe Positive Behavior Support Process ? • A data-driven team approach with built-in accountability • Follows a carefully look at the context of the problem behavior • Hypothesizes why the behavior is occurring. • Develops a plan to teach the student a replacement behavior and new skills • Changes environments to match student needs • Involves people who really care about the student • Develops a written plan capturing the team’s decisions and methods 31

  31. Positive Behavioral Support Principle: Behavior serves a purpose for the student. All behaviors, including problem behavior, allow the student to get a need met (i.e., behavior serves a function). Although all functions are legitimate and desirable, the method or form of the behavior may require alteration. 33

  32. Key Concept: • This behavior has worked in the past, or it is currently working to either: • get something the student desires or • avoid or protest something the student wishes to remove. 34

  33. Requirement: A behavior plan must identify the function of the problem behavior. This is necessary in order to develop a plan that teaches an alternative replacement behavior that serves the same function. 37

  34. Method: Observing the student in the problem situation and interviewing others who are frequently present when the problem occurs is required. Focusing on the student’s facial expression and the response of others often yields cues as to what the function of the behavior may be. 40

  35. Examples of functions of behavior: Billy  Billy throws his work on the floor because it is hard work for him. When he does this, his face shows anger and frustration. His actions are a protest. 41

  36. Examples of functions of behavior: Dolores Dolores giggles and disrupts peers around her because she enjoys the attention and reactions she gets and her face shows pleasure and excitement. Her actions are to get social attention, even when that attention from peers is one of displeasure and disapproval. 42

  37. Examples of functions of behavior:   Bruce  Bruce uses swear words not related to what is going on around him. His face shows pleasure and excitement and he uses these words as a method of starting a conversation, e.g., his peers immediately tell him not to use these words and start conversing with him about the use of appropriate language. His actions are to get social interactions started. 43

  38. 44 • Positive Behavioral Support Principle: Behavior is related to the context/ environment in which it occurs. Key Concept: Something is either present in the environment, or NOT present in the environment which increases the like- lihood the problem behavior will occur.

  39. Requirement: The behavior plan must identify what environmental features support the problem behavior. This is necessary in order to know what environmental changes will remove the student’s need to use the problem behavior to achieve something he or she desired. 45

  40. 46

  41. 47 Method: Observing the student in the problem situation and interviewing others who are frequently present when the problem occurs is required. Focusing on everything going on around the student, the nature of the instruction, interactions with and around the student, and the work output required by the curriculum is necessary to understand why the student uses this problem behavior in that particular place, at that time.

  42. 48 Examples of context/environment impact on problem behavior: Billy Billy has NOT YET received support to complete difficult work. He throws math or reading worksheets that appear long and hard to him on the floor.

  43. Examples of context/environment impact on problem behavior: Dolores Dolores has NOT YET received direct instruction on how to appropriately make and keep friends. Her peers reinforce her behavior inadvertently by their strong responses. Her peers have neither learned how to reinforce her for appropriate behavior, nor learned how to change their loud expressions of disapproval in response to Dolores’ behavior. 49

  44. Examples of context/environment impact on problem behavior: Bruce Bruce has NOT YET received instruction on how to initiate social conversation without the use of his attention-getting swear words. His peers have not learned how to direct Bruce to use the alternative method of attention-seeking rather than giving him attention by correcting him for his attention-seeking behaviors. They will be important in shaping a new behavior. 50

  45. Positive Behavioral Support Principle: There are two strands to a complete behavior plan. Key Concept: Changing behavior requires addressing both the environmental features (removing the need for use of problem behavior to get needs met) AND developing a replacement behavior (teaching a functionally-equivalent behavior that student can use to get that same need met in an acceptable way). 51

  46. Requirement: A complete behavior plan must address both strands: make environmental changes that support acceptable behavior, AND specify how to teach or elicit functionally equivalent acceptable behavior and new skills. 52

  47. Method: Writing an effective two strand plan requires a collaborative team that includes plan implementers and other important, supportive people in the student’s life such as family members, any agency personnel (e.g., social workers, mental health providers, probation officers) and of course the student if his/her participation is possible. 53

  48. Examples of two strand, complete approaches: Billy Billy’s team decided, and his teacher agreed, that she will alter his assignments so that hard work will not appear overwhelming to him (remove need to protest). Billy will be taught an acceptable protest for work that appears difficult, such as calling the teacher over and telling her the work appears long and hard (functionally- equivalent alternative behavior). 54

  49. Examples of two strand, complete approaches: Dolores Dolores’ team, decided she will receive instruction on how to make and keep friends. Her peers will receive instruction in how to calmly redirect her to use appropriate interactions to achieve their brief expressions of approval (remove need to get social attention in maladaptive ways). Dolores will learn brief interactions during work periods that result in social approval from her peers, yet do not disrupt others (get social attention with functionally-equivalent alternative behavior). 55

  50. Examples of two strand, complete approaches: Bruce Bruce’s teachers will provide collaborative learning opportunities that allow Bruce to be in sustained social interactions with his peers (removes need to use swear words to start a social interaction). Bruce will be taught specific social interaction initiation techniques and his peers will be taught how to prompt him to use these techniques (functionally equivalent ways of starting a social dialogue). 56