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Positive Behavior Intervention Supports

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  1. Positive Behavior Intervention Supports C.E.S. PBIS Network Year 1- Session 2 Presented by: Dr. Christine Peck

  2. Critical Features • PBIS Team • Faculty/Staff Commitment • Expectations and Rules Developed • Plans for Teaching expectations/rules • Reward/Recognition Program Established • Effective Procedures for Dealing with Problem Behaviors • Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established • Classroom Systems • Evaluation • Implementation Plan

  3. Why Do We Behave the Way We Do? IT WORKS! Behaviors are LEARNED and continue because they serve a PURPOSE or FUNCTION We engage in behaviors because we have learned that a DESIRED OUTCOME occurs

  4. The “Get Tough” approach:Assumption that “problem” student… • Is inherently “bad” • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of aversives • Will be better tomorrow…

  5. “Exposure to exclusionary discipline has been shown not to improve school outcomes, but in fact to be associated with higher rates of school dropout.” (Skiba, Peterson, and Williams, 1997)

  6. Science and our experiences have taught us that students… • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors” • Do NOT learn when presented with aversive consequences …Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback

  7. 1 2 3 4 Underlying Principles of 3-Tiered Prevention Models4 Components What are thepredictable failures? What can we do to prevent failure? How will we maintain consistency? Same at Every Level!! How will we know if it’s working?

  8. What would a positive, encouraging school climate look like?

  9. Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying

  10. What would a positive, encouraging school climate look like? • Students know what is expected of them and choose to do so because they: • Know what to do • Have the skills to do it • See the natural benefits for acting responsibly • Adults and students have more time to: • Focus on relationships • Focus on classroom instruction • There is an instructional approach to discipline • Instances of problem behavior are opportunities to learn and practice prosocial behavior

  11. School-wide Behavior Expectations • For all students, across all settings • Guidelines: • 3 – 5 Expectations • State positively • Use common & few words • Why? • Consistent communications • Consistent language

  12. Rules for visiting my pool… Other than that, have fun!

  13. T H E DO NOTs

  14. Saying & doing it “Positively!” Keep off the grass!

  15. Common language • It’s not enough to say “Be respectful” • Common language should define what we will see and hear when we are “Being Respectful”

  16. What will our school-wide expectations be? What do we already have in place?

  17. Let’s look at discipline data … What do you notice?

  18. Using resources to define SW Expectations with Rules/Specific Behavior • What did your data reveal as “top” behaviors? • Physical Contact • Threats • Inappropriate behavior, touch, language • Disruptions • Developmentally appropriate guidelines

  19. High Schools

  20. Middle Schools & Alternative Learning Centers 3 – 5

  21. Elementary Schools

  22. Your Turn • Consider your NEXT steps: • Select 3 – 5 school-wide behaviors • State expectations in positive terms • Select expectations that are general enough to be applicable in multiple settings, but specific enough to be of assistance in generating rules for targeted settings • Create your expectations with your cultural or contextual fit, e.g., We SOAR!, Kenwood B.L.U.E. • Who will do what - when? • Are there other resources you need?

  23. Teaching Matrix Activity Classroom Lunchroom Bus Hallway Assembly Respect Others • Use inside voice • ________ • Eat your own food • __________ • Stay in your seat • _________ • Stay to right • _________ • Arrive on time to speaker • __________ Respect Environment & Property • Recycle paper • _________ • Return trays • __________ • Keep feet on floor • __________ • Put trash in cans • _________ • Take litter with you • __________ Respect Yourself • Do your best • __________ • Wash your hands • __________ • Be at stop on time • __________ • Use your words • __________ • Listen to speaker • __________ Respect Learning • Have materials ready • __________ • Eat balanced diet • __________ • Go directly from bus to class • __________ • Go directly to class • __________ • Discuss topic in class w/ others • __________ Stated in a Positive way What do you want them to do!

  24. What locations should we target?

  25. 2. NATURAL CONTEXT (Locations) 1. Expectations Expectations 3. Rules or Specific Behaviors

  26. What Is Gained by Identifying Rules? Consistent instruction across multiple programs and settings within the school Communication among staff members and students Students know what to expect and what is expected in all areas Consistent communication with parents

  27. Increasing the conditions for learning

  28. Anchored to the School Wide rules

  29. Expectations

  30. SW Teaching Matrix

  31. Your Turn • Consider your NEXT steps: • Use the Teaching Matrix to identify rules in all target areas in your school. • Design ways to communicate and get input on the matrix from your staff. • Who will do what - when? • Are there other resources that you need?

  32. Critical Elements • PBIS Team • Faculty/Staff Commitment • Expectations and Rules Developed • Plans for Teaching Expectations/Rules • Acknowledgement Program Established • Effective Procedures for Dealing with Problem Behaviors • Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established • Classroom Systems • Evaluation • Implementation Plan

  33. “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……teach? …punish?” “Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” (Herner, 1998) ? ? ? ? ? ?

  34. Developing a System for Teaching Appropriate Behavior Once you have developed school-wide expectations, it is not enough to just post the words on the walls… YOU MUST TEACH (and RETEACH) THEM!

  35. Behaviors are prerequisites for academics Procedures and routines create structure Repetition is key to learning new skills: For a child to learn something new, it needs to be repeated on average of ___ times Adults average ____ - Joyce and Showers, 2006 For a child to unlearn an old behavior and replace with a new behavior, the new behavior must be repeated on average ___ times (Harry Wong) Why Develop a System for Teaching Behavior? 8 25 28

  36. Provide initial lesson plans and/or lesson plan format to teach specific behaviors identified on the Matrix Develop an efficient teaching system

  37. Teaching Academics & Behaviors Behavioral change is an instructional process