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School Wide Positive Behavior Supports

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  1. School Wide Positive Behavior Supports Unity Elementary 2009

  2. What is School Wide Positive Behavioral Supports? • SW-PBS provides structure and support for developing systems of positive and proactive school-wide and individualized interventions strategies that… • promote a positive learning environment, • create a positive culture, • teach and reinforce appropriate behaviors, • prevent problem behaviors.

  3. What does PBS look like? • >80% of students can tell you what is expected of them • Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative • Function based behavior support is foundation for addressing individual problem behavior. • Data & team-based action planning & implementation are operating. • Administrators are active participants. • Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students

  4. Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  5. WHY • Why implement School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports?

  6. Research over the past 15 years has shown that PBS is effective in promoting positive behavior in students in schools. • Schools that implement system-wide interventions report increased time engaged in academic activities and improved academic performance.

  7. Implementation

  8. Establish Commitment • Staff/Faculty support the need for behavioral change. • Behavioral change is one of the top priorities of the school. • Three-year commitment and effort to sustain beyond three years.

  9. Team is Developed • School team is developed • Administrator (active participant) • Teachers and non teaching staff • Parent • PBS Coach • Community member • student

  10. SW-PBS - What does it look like? • Define behavioral expectations • Teach behavioral expectations • Monitor and reward appropriate behavior • Provide corrective consequences for problem behaviors. • Use collected data to solve problems and make decisions.

  11. Defining Expectations…

  12. Define School-Wide Expectationsfor Behavior • Identify 3-5 Expectations • Short statements • Positive Statements (what to do, not what to avoid doing) • Memorable

  13. Few positive SW expectations defined, taught, & encouraged

  14. Longfellow Elementary • Show Respect • Positive Attitude • Ownership/Responsibility • Try your Best

  15. Longfellow Elementary

  16. Akron Westfield • Double RPK • Respectful • Responsible • Prepared • Kind

  17. Akron-Westfield

  18. West Sioux Elementary School • The Three Bees… • Be respectful • Be responsible • Be ready

  19. West Sioux Elementary

  20. Teach

  21. Expectations & behavioral skills are taught & recognized in natural context

  22. Park Avenue Expectation Lesson Plan At Park Avenue, we are people of character. We are respectful. We are responsible. We care. Area:CafeteriaTime Allotted:15-20 minutes Materials needed: For script: trays, utensils, milk, napkins, buckets for silverware, garbage can, trays for all students to practice for classroom teacher: Expectations • Walk down the right side of the stairs quietly using the handrail one step at a time. • Enter cafeteria using line basics (Hands at sides, facing forward, voices off.) • Take the first milk you touch and hold it carefully in your hand. • Take the first utensil you touch. • Take your tray and say “thank you”. • Choose items and put them on your tray. Once you have touched something it’s yours. • Enter your number. • Go to the directed table and quietly eat your own lunch - no sharing. • Raise your hand and wait to be dismissed. • Put your utensils carefully into the tub. • Carry your tray carefully and throw out everything. • Stack your tray on the counter so it fits inside the others. • Leave the lunchroom quietly and walk to recess.

  23. Longfellow Elementary SPOT Pledge • I will Show respect for myself and others • I will choose a Positive attitude • I will take Ownership for my actions • I will always Try my best

  24. On-going Monitoring and Acknowledging of Appropriate Behavior • Every faculty and staff member acknowledges appropriate behavior. • 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative contacts • System that makes acknowledgement easy and simple for students and staff. • Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate behavior (small frequent rewards more effective) • Beginning of class recognition • Raffles • Open gym • Social acknowledgement

  25. Akron-Westfield

  26. Name: _______________Class___________ Respectful Responsible Prepared Kind You have been caught by a GUEST TEACHER!

  27. Corrective Consequences Problem Behaviors • Do not ignore problem behavior • Office Discipline Referral Forms • Provide clear guidelines for what is handled in class versus sent to the office • Remember the PURPOSE of negative consequences • Prevent escalation of problem behaviors • Prevent/minimize reward for problem behaviors • Deliver punisher as a consequence for problem behavior • Minor versus major • Do not expect negative consequences to change behavior patterns. Negative consequences are a way to “keep the lid on.”

  28. Use of data • Using data to make decisions and solve problems • Use of data to determination implementation integrity

  29. Office Discipline Referrals • Data collection method • Shared frequently with all staff • Data is presented visually for easy interpretation • Simple • Take very little teacher time to fill out • Consistency across school staff • Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions • Distinction between office v. classroom managed

  30. Data to DetermineImplementation Integrity • Self-Assessment • School-Wide Evaluation Tool • Team Checklist

  31. School-Wide Systems(common language, vision, experience Involving all students, all staff, & all settings) Priority For Improvement

  32. SET Evaluation(School Wide Evaluation Tool)Fall 2007

  33. What Schools Are Implementing PBS • Longfellow Elementary (Sioux City) • Akron-Westfield Elementary • Akron-Westfield MS • West Sioux Elementary • West Sioux MS • Boyden-Hull Elementary • South O’Brien Elementary • South O’Brien Junior High • Smith Elementary (Sioux City) • Sacred Heart Elementary (Sioux City)

  34. Does Implementation ofSW-PBS Work?

  35. Yes… • When implemented with integrity • Office referrals decrease • Time students engaged in instruction increases • Building staff report less need to improve discipline systems • Some limited research that suggests increases in reading proficiency

  36. Office Discipline Referrals(Referrals/100 students)

  37. Office Discipline Referrals(Referrals/100 students) - Major Referrals

  38. Middle 15 (no) 7 (yes) Elementary 38 (no) 31 (yes)

  39. N =23 N = 8 N = 8 N = 23

  40. Educational Psychology, Vol. 25, Nos. 2/3, March/June 2005 “Whole-School Positive Behaviour Support: Effects on student discipline problems and academic performance”James K. Luisell*, Robert F. Putnam, Marcie W. Handler, and Adam B. Feinberg • Psychology in the Schools, Vol. 43(6), 2006 “The relationship of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support to academic achievement in an urban middle school.” Stephen R. Lassen, Michael M. Steele, and Wayne Sailor • Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Newsletter (“Academic Achievement and the Implementation of School-wide Behavior Support.” January, 2006 Robert F. Putnam
May InstituteRobert H. Horner 
University of Oregon; Robert Algozzine
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

  41. Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  42. THREE-YEAR SW-PBS PLAN

  43. Questions