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NASP Website: www.nasponline.org

NASP Website: www.nasponline.org

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NASP Website: www.nasponline.org

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  1. NASP Model for Comprehensive Integrated SP Services A Framework for School Psychology Practice: Getting Started at the District Level PRESENTERS: Kathleen Minke, PhD, NCSP NASP President, 2010-11 Sally Baas, Minnesota NASP Delegate NASP Website: www.nasponline.org

  2. Objectives for Today Learn the NASP Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP Practice Model) Evaluate the landscape for opportunities for promoting the practice model given your state and district policies and practices and your staff professional development needs Develop strategies for incorporating the Model into Policy and Practice

  3. NASP Practice Model An organized and coherent framework to advocate for and communicate about school psychological services www.nasponline.org/practicemodel

  4. Standards for School PsychologyRevised and Adopted - 2010 Standards for Graduate Preparation of School Psychologists Standards for the Credentialing of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services http://www.nasponline.org/standards/2010standards.aspx

  5. Standards Documents Provide a unified set of national principles that guide graduate education, credentialing, professional practice and services, and ethical behavior of effective school psychologists Intended to: define contemporary school psychology promote school psychological services for children, families and schools provide a foundation for the future of school psychology

  6. Standards Documents, continued Used to communicate NASP’s positions and advocate for qualifications and practices of school psychologists with stakeholders, policy makers, and other professional groups at the national, state, and local levels.

  7. Impact of NASP Standards NASP has promoted standards for over 30 years. These standards have transformed the profession and are the backbone of preparation and practice. Most states use these standards for credentialing and licensure purposes. Many school districts use these standards as the basis for SP performance evaluations. Currently: 182 training programs are NASP Approved 31 states accept the NCSP 11,629 school psychologists hold the NCSP

  8. The NASP Practice Model is designed to promote the connection between our training, standards, and actual practice. 8

  9. How does the Practice Model connect with Blueprint III? Practice Model Blueprint III Commissioned by NASP but not adopted as policy Developed by school psychology leaders using a “think tank” approach Intended as a visionary document to promote discussion in the field • Officially adopted NASP policy • Developed by the Standards revision workgroup using a “consensus” approach • Intended as policy

  10. How does the Practice Model connect with Blueprint III? All previous Standards documents and Blueprints 1-3 all helped inform the Practice model. Many of the conceptual ideas and components of Blueprint 3 are integrated into the Practice Model.

  11. Why We Need a Practice Model It provides a more organized and coherent framework to advocate for and communicate about school psychological services, particularly with school administrators and policymakers It provides a concrete tool for advocating for roles and job preservation It promotes consistency of practice by delineating what services might reasonably be expected to be available from school psychologists It provides direction for excellence in delivery of services

  12. Using a “Model” Successfully School counselors (ASCA) introduced their model, ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs, in 2003. http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/execsumm.pdf Effects: most states have adopted it as the standard for school counseling services regularly referred to in state & federal policy dialogues used at the state level to advocate successfully for their recommended ratio and roles (1:250) http://asca2.timberlakepublishing.com//files/Ratios07-08.pdf 12

  13. Having a Model Improves Ratios School Counselors 1:250 Alabama ratio: 1:398 Mississippi ratio: 1:461 Tennessee ratio: 1:500 (K-6) & 1:350 (7-12) School Psychologists 1:1000* Alabama ratio: 1:4940 Mississippi ratio: 1:7960 Tennessee ratio: 1:2704 (*previously recommended. 2004 SP data reported here.)

  14. Model for Comprehensive and Integrated SP Services: Components Two major sections: Professional Practices – aligned with 10 domains of practice that are the core components of the model Organizational Principles – intended to be utilized by organizations that employ school psychologists

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  16. Professional Practices That Permeate all Aspects of Service Delivery Domain 1: Data-based decision making and accountability Knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment and data collection for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes. 17

  17. Professional Practices That Permeate All Aspects of Service Delivery Domain 2: Consultation and collaboration Knowledge of varied models and strategies for consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems, and methods to promote effective implementation of services. 18

  18. Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Student-Level Services Domain 3: Interventions and instructional support to develop academic skills knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curricula and instructional strategies 19

  19. Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Student-Level Services Domain 4: Interventions and mental health services to develop social and life skills knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social-emotional functioning and mental health 20

  20. Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Systems-Level Services Domain 5: School-wide practices to promote learning knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote learning and mental health 21

  21. Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Systems-Level Services Domain 6: Preventive and responsive services knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health; services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response 22

  22. Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools System Level Services Domain 7: Family-school collaboration services knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning and mental health; and strategies to develop collaboration between families and schools 23

  23. Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Domain 8: Diversity in development and learning knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity 24

  24. Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Domain 9: Research and program evaluation knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings 25

  25. Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Domain 10: Legal, ethical, and professional practice knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists 26

  26. “COFFEE TALK”Talk Amongst Yourselves:Considering the 10 domains of practice….What is your “best skill” and your “greatest challenge” from the identified domains?

  27. COFFEE TALK Instructions Break into groups of 3-4. Assign a recorder for the group. Discuss: Using this list of 10 domains, what are your BEST SKILLS and BIGGEST CHALLENGES? Each person can select up to 3 best skills and 3 biggest challenges. Domains: Data-based decision making and accountability Consultation and collaboration Interventions and instructional support to develop academic skills Interventions and mental health services to develop social and life skills School-wide practices to promote learning Preventive and responsive services Family-school collaboration services Diversity in development and learning Research and program evaluation Legal, ethical, and professional practice

  28. Self Assessment Purpose: To assist individuals in evaluating their own professional development needs relative to the 10 domains of practice Description: Online survey asking participants to rate how frequently and with what importance the 10 domains of practice are to their work Self-identify domains that reflect personal strength and challenges Provide immediate feedback to the user to help guide professional development selections

  29. Organizational Principles Outlines the organizational conditions that must be met in order to ensure effective delivery of school psychological services for children, families, and schools.

  30. Organizational Principles Services are based upon a strategic assessment of needs and are coordinated, organized, and delivered in a manner that ensures a comprehensive and seamless continuum of services Services are delivered within a climate of mutual respect Physical, personnel, and fiscal support systems are provided Positive, proactive professional communication is ensured Supervision and mentoring are provided Professional development and recognition systems are available

  31. School Psychology RatioOrganizational Principle 3.2 …. “Generally, the ratio should not exceed one school psychologist for every 1000 students. When school psychologists are providing comprehensive and preventive services (i.e., evaluations, consultation, individual/group counseling, crisis response, behavioral interventions, etc), this ratio should not exceed one school psychologist for every 500 to 700 students in order to ensure quality of student outcomes.Similarly, when school psychologists are assigned to work primarily with student populations that have particularly intensive special needs (e.g., students with significant emotional or behavioral disorders, or students with autism spectrum disorders), this school psychologist to student ratio should be even lower.”

  32. Evaluating the Landscape for Reform

  33. National Public Policy Themes Student Achievement & Learning Accountability Data Based Decision Making Prevention P-21 (College and Career Ready) Highly Qualified Professionals Connecting to Families & Communities

  34. The SP Model in the Context of Educational Public Policy • Emphasis on data driven decision making • Focus on supports for student learning and social/emotional development • Family-school collaboration • Increased emphasis on prevention • Focus on evaluation of services

  35. “If you are not at the table, you are on the menu…” --Author Unknown

  36. How about another “Coffee Talk?” “Discuss amongst yourselves…” How could school psychologists be more involved in state/district discussions about: Data based decision making Student learning supports Social-emotional learning School safety and climate Family-school engagement Prevention of school failure Evaluation of student outcome measures

  37. Developing Messages and Advocacy Plans at the State and Local Levels

  38. We need to make the case for our services. No one else will do it for us. What do decision-makers need to know about school psychologists?

  39. Key Messages Re: Practice Model When implemented properly, the NASP Practice Model can contribute to: improved academic engagement and achievement more effective instruction positive behavior and socially successful students safe, positive school climates stronger family–school partnerships improved school completion and career readiness improved assessment, data-driven problem solving, and accountability

  40. Step 1: Recognize Current Communications & Advocacy Opportunities New legislation or programs in your state that are prompting change (eg. Race to the Top) New school administrators in your district/state and their “school improvement initiatives” Annual school planning events such as budget design and approval process, needs assessments, etc. Upcoming planning for issues or legislative change (eg. reauthorization of NCLB/ESEA) Federal policy shifts that could assist in rolling out the model (eg. Growing acceptance of the need for school mental health services)

  41. Step 2: Utilizing the Proper Communication Strategy Three Types of Strategic Communications “Calling Card” Sharing a message “Action Request” Focusing on resolving a problem “Crisis Management” Managing the communications about the crisis in the moment

  42. Or, In Audience-Friendly Terms Crisis Management Intensive Action Request Targeted Calling Card Universal

  43. Universal: “Calling Card” Goals Increase your visibility Raise awareness and comfort level on an issue Promote involvement Improve collaboration Disseminate useful information Create environment for stakeholder “buy-in” Promote necessary changes in behavior and/or perceptions

  44. “Calling Card” Tactics Provide helpful information and materials on related topics and services Newsletter articles directed at parents, teachers, and administrators “Research says…” communications with policymakers, administrators Parent handouts Info for website In-service trainings or sponsored workshops Focus group discussion with stakeholders (educators, parents)

  45. Targeted: “Action Request” Goals Specific requests for “action” are identified. Link to needs, benefits, and expected outcomes. Examples include: Increased funding Support for expanded programming (school MH services, RTI, etc.) Improved professional to student ratios Improved collaboration and coordination of services Specific requests for changes in role, duties, responsibilities, etc.

  46. “Action Request” Tactics Dissemination of data related to needs, recommendations, and expected outcomes Face to face meetings with decision makers Information presentations (school board, inservices, parents) Coalition/relationship building with allied professionals to build broad support for specific ideas/requests Legislative briefings Media outreach

  47. Step 3: Planning your Communications Assess Situation Identify Target Audiences Effective Communications Planning Desired Improved Outcomes Stakeholder Buy-In Craft Messages Select Strategies Evaluate/Follow-up Implement

  48. Developing Your Messages