CRIMINOLOGY 220: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY JANUARY 21, 2013 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CRIMINOLOGY 220: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY JANUARY 21, 2013

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  1. Criminology 220 CRIMINOLOGY 220:RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGYJANUARY 21, 2013 Librarian (Surrey) Simon Fraser University

  2. Today’s class • Finding Background info (online CRIM resources) • Finding books & articles • Choosing a database or search tool • Scholarly versus popular articles • APA citation and avoiding plagiarism • Getting help Criminology 220

  3. Library Research Guides The library’s homepage: www.lib.sfu.ca Click on “Browse Research Guides” Click on Criminology and then pick Crim 220 Criminology 220

  4. Step 1: Background Sources • What are they? • Encyclopedias and other reference sources that provide a topic overview and hint at sub-topics • Why use them? • Helps you narrow a topic that is too big; good starting point • Helps you identify terminology used in the field • Helps you identify key researchers • Helps you find related readings • Where do you find them? • Library reference section • Online Reference Sources (or search catalogue) Criminology 220

  5. Encyclopedias/handbooks • Gale: Criminology Subcollection + other social sciences collections • Oxford: Broad range of Reference Sources • Sage: 11 Criminology Titles in Criminology and Criminal Justice Package

  6. DSM-IV Online • DSM-IV-TR® Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders • Includes current and historical versions • The “standard diagnostic tool used by mental health professionals…. Each psychiatric disorder…is accompanied by a set of diagnostic criteria and descriptive details including associated features, prevalence, familial patterns, age-, culture-, and gender-specific features, and differential diagnosis” Criminology 220

  7. DSM-IV Online Criminology 220

  8. Sage Research Methods Online (SRMO) • Online portal to research methodology information in the social sciences • 600 + online books • Chapter: “Looking Forward: the Future of Qualitative Research in Criminology” • Chapter: “Doing Research on Crime and Justice: A Political Endeavour?” • Research Methods Map • Videos Criminology 220

  9. Sage Research Methods Online (SRMO) Criminology 220

  10. Where to Search…? Criminology 220

  11. Catalogue • The “mothership” of SFU Library’s library data • Complete information on almost everything SFU Library provides access to: • Books and eBooks (170,000 ebooks and 1,350,000 print books) • Movies, (e.g., streaming NFB films) • Sound effects • Database names (Academic Search Premier, etc.) • Journal Titles • BUT: no journal articles Criminology 220

  12. Catalogue Searching Criminology 220

  13. Fast Search • Key advantages of Fast Search: • Broad search can capture unique terms/proper names across thousands of sources • Tool for beginning research outside your discipline • 3 Branch availability • Search for books and articles at the same time • Easy + fun faceted searching

  14. Library Search • Searches 100% of Fast Search content, (which contains 100% of the library’s catalogue) • Divides Fast Search content by info type – books & media, newspaper articles & more, journal articles • Additionally, includes: • Summit, the Institutional Repository • The library website – FAQs, Research Guides & other web pages • Course reserves Criminology 220

  15. Library Search • no results?  WorldCat  Interlibrary loan request form • Best Bets • Criminal Code Criminology 220

  16. Databases Criminology 220

  17. Which Databases? • Criminology specific/appropriate databases: • Criminal Justice Abstracts • PsycINFO • Sociological Abstracts • General databases: • Academic Search Premier • Google Scholar – Access through library! Criminology 220

  18. Subject Databases • Why use subject databases? Key strengths: • Allow for literature reviews • Sophisticated search limits, based on higher quality metadata • Extra tools (times cited, bibliometrics, etc.) • Subject-relevant data fields, E.g. PsycINFO • Research methodology (from brain imaging to twin study) • Age group (child, teen, adult, senior) • Population type: male, female, animal, human, inpatient, outpatient

  19. Google • Access Google through the library for free access to subscription resources (automatic on campus) • PRO: Fast and easy! • BUT: Mysterious algorithms – what is covered? Are some publishers favored? Can the database accurately judge what is scholarly? • AND: inaccurate data • AND: less control over search Criminology 220

  20. Articles: Scholarly versus Popular Criminology 220

  21. Scholarly versus Popular Scholarly Journal Articles Popular Magazine Articles • Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice • Audience: Academics • Writers: Unpaid scholars and researchers • Often visually boring with tables, charts but no advertising • Include abstracts and citations • Good for historical, current, scholarly, in-depth perspectives • Subject-specific jargon • Key criterion: peer-reviewed • Macleans • Audience: General public • Writers: Paid, non-specialist • Colorful, graphics, advertisements • Does not include abstracts or citations • Good for broad overview and popular perspective • Accessible language Criminology 220

  22. Finding Scholarly Journal Articles • You must use scholarly journal articles • Look for synonymous terms such as: • Scholarly articles • Academic journals • Peer-reviewed • Refereed Criminology 220

  23. Definition of a Scholarly Article: • Articles in scholarly journals are peer-reviewed* “Peer-reviewed journals are publications that include only those articles that have been reviewed and/or qualified by a selected panel of acknowledged experts in the field of study covered by the journal” --EBSCO • Peer-reviewed articles = Refereed articles • “Academic article” used interchangeably with “scholarly article” *key criterion = peer-reviewed

  24. APA guides and plagiarism tutorial APA guides Plagiarism tutorial

  25. APA Guides • Actual APA guides available for check-out in the library Criminology 220

  26. APA Guides • APA provides much guidance for citing scholarly journal articles – quite straightforward • More unusual items – course pack materials, Facebook posts, data tables from Statistics Canada, etc., can be trickier – grey areas that may require some interpretation • In these cases, • Follow APA general citation guidelines (order of elements) • Check out APA blog for extra guidance • Always proofread auto-generated citations!!! Criminology 220

  27. Writing and avoiding plagiarism • If you don’t know how to correctly cite a document, feel free to ask a librarian for help. • If you want help with writing/structuring your paper or quoting/paraphrasing documents, see the Student Learning Commons • Workshops • One-to-one appointments • Drop-in consultations • Online handouts

  28. Patchwriting? • What is “patchwriting”? 1. Copying portions of papers from other classes and then resubmitting them as part of a new paper in a different class (a form of plagiarism) 2. Using an inappropriately informal and colloquial writing style 3. A form of plagiarism in which a writer relies too heavily on the words and sentence structure of the author’s original text Criminology 220

  29. Is this plagiarism? Direct quotation:  “When a significant violation of public trust has occurred, lying is a common corollary because the wrongdoing invites concealment” (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008, p. 838). Student A’s paper: If a serious violation of public trust occurs, lying is often the result because this action invites concealment (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008).

  30. Is this plagiarism? Direct quotation:  “When a significant violation of public trust has occurred, lying is a common corollary because the wrongdoing invites concealment” (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008, p. 838). Student A’s paper: If a serious violation of public trust occurs, lying is often the result because this action invites concealment (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008).

  31. Is this plagiarism? • Patchwriting = • A form of plagiarism in which a writer relies too heavily on the words and sentence structure of the author’s original text.

  32. Is this plagiarism? Direct quotation:  “When a significant violation of public trust has occurred, lying is a common corollary because the wrongdoing invites concealment” (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008, p. 838). Student B’s paper: Organizations often feel compelled to lie about their actions when they are discovered to have taken advantage of the public (Fleming & Zyglidopoulos, 2008).

  33. Need Help? • The library provides many ways to get help: • In-person at the reference desk • Telephone • Email • Chat reference - AskAway • Txt Us • Learning Commons • Andrea Cameron, Criminology Liaison Librarian amcamero@sfu.ca Criminology 220