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Creating a "Next Generation" e-Commerce Experience

Creating a "Next Generation" e-Commerce Experience. Jean-Yves Martineau - Founder Cactus Commerce Scott Cairney - VP of Product Management Cactus Commerce. Outline. Who are we Trends to watch Cross-channel strategy New channels Key inflection points in cross-channel

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Creating a "Next Generation" e-Commerce Experience

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  1. Creating a "Next Generation" e-Commerce Experience Jean-Yves Martineau - Founder Cactus Commerce Scott Cairney - VP of Product Management Cactus Commerce

  2. Outline • Who are we • Trends to watch • Cross-channel strategy • New channels • Key inflection points in cross-channel • Where to begin for a sound strategy • User experience & e-commerce • Why UX is so important • Where we are in the hype cycle • Commerce Server 2009 – platform enabling • Introducing Commerce Server 2009 • Q&A

  3. "This announcement from Microsoft is a breath of fresh air into Commerce Server's image," says Gartner research VP Gene Alvarez. “ InformationWeek, August 8, 2007

  4. We Understand the Flow of Goods

  5. Marketing/Brand Management Marketing & Brand Agencies Technology Dev

  6. The Future of e-Commerce Trends to Watch

  7. Driver of Change: Abundance • In the 1950’s, everyone dreamed of owning a car and a home… • Today: • 2 out of 3 Americans own their own home • 13 percent of homes purchased are 2nd homes • Number of cars exceeds drivers • Self-storage • $17B+ business • U.S. spends more on trash bags than 90 other countries spend on everything • Gross commoditization makes process optimization woefully insufficient

  8. “A focus on cost-cutting and efficiency has helped many organizations weather the downturn, but this approach will ultimately render them obsolete. Only the constant pursuit of innovation can ensure long-term success.”- Daniel Muzyka, Dean, Sauder School of Business, Univ. of British Columbia

  9. AccelerationA Brief History of Economics Information Age Agricultural Age Conceptual Age Industrial Age Source: Dan Pink, A Whole New Mind

  10. “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.” - General Eric Shinseki, Chief of Staff. U. S. Army

  11. “UPS used to be a trucking company with technology. Now it’s a technology company with trucks.” - Forbes

  12. The "Infolust" Trend • Looking at the “always-on” generation • Also known as the click-to-knows • Using search engines everyday to get instant information on everything including your people and your products • Instant gratification • Proliferation of smart devices • Ubiquitous high bandwidth access • The clash with the “real world”…

  13. New Channels • Augmented reality • Wearable tech • Ultra-mobile computers • Digital signage • Etc.

  14. Multi-player Mobile Game • Engage consumers with a multi-player game controlled through their mobile phones

  15. Interactive Windows • Interact with the audience 24/7 – outside or inside the store • Browse a catalog 24/7 – outside or inside the store

  16. Mobile Augmented Reality • Use mobile devices to augment reality and interact with customers • User generated tagging of the physical world

  17. The FutureAugmented Reality to Guide Consumers Through Complex Tasks • Replacing car parts • Renovation projects • Assemble IKEA furniture

  18. The Future of e-Commerce How to Engage and Improve Customer Satisfaction

  19. Mobile Becomes Ubiquitous • Apple iPhone, 3 SkypePhone, Amazon Kindle, Google Android, Windows Mobile… • 3G+ = 10% of 3.2B global mobile subscribers in C2007E – • 21% (critical mass inflection point) of 3.9B in C2009E(iSuppli) • 91% of mobile users keep phone within 1 meter reach 24x7 (China Mobile 50K survey) • 15-20% of mobiles have GPS, 50% within 5 years(Morgan Stanley Research) • Watch for new generation of Internet leaders to capitalize on growing access to fast Internet access on mobiles • Incumbent carriers + handset manufacturers still desire to control markets – financial dislocations / costs / opportunities may be substantive as wireless industry evolves over next 2-5 years • ATT CQ1 – Wireless data revenue up 57% Y/Y to 22% of wireless service revenue vs. 16% Y/Y. ~13% of devices are 3G and carry 20% higher ARPU than 2G base + iPhoneARPU 2x AT&T average

  20. B2B Companies Using Web 2.0 web 2.0 reality in B2B Source: 2007 Survey of National Advertisers and BtoBOnlinecom

  21. Multi/Cross Channel Linked Forrester - February 2008 “B2B CMO Investment Priorities For 2008”

  22. An Example

  23. The Imperatives • Business imperatives • Bottom up functionality • Simplicity, more practicality • Improves efficiency and speed User imperatives • Web based • Easy to use • Inherently social Brand imperatives • Consistent and compelling application of voice • Credible brand behavior • Clear connection to promise

  24. So Why Is UX So Important? • There’s so much out there on the Internet and there’s no sign of anything slowing down • Technology alone doesn't give you a competitive advantage anymore • Wide bandwidth availability ubiquitously provides a vehicle for richer content; if you don't use it, your competitors will

  25. User Experience User Experience DATA MAGIC Business Logic

  26. Key Inflection Points • The various channels and devices should be designed to work together, complimentarily, not in silos • The experience itself must be consistent with itself throughout the devices • Moving from text intensive to visual cues and motion to communicate brand and emotion • The digital world’s influence on the “real world”

  27. Key Inflection Points • Not all actions that are possible on one channel are suitable on other channels • Don’t underestimate the importance of meta-data and semantics in your design • Next generation design strategies: inclusive design patterns that cross cultural bounds

  28. Where To Begin? • Build your differentiation through innovation: • Don’t focus on the technology first, focus on the end game – what’s the resulting experience? • Gaining cross team alignment is key • Take time to structure the underlying meta-data you will need to represent your experience well • Use interactive story boards to gain early feedback and make cheap adjustments before you put in the “guts” to make it all real

  29. How do you go about innovating, anyway?

  30. Concepts Applied • Visual tools introduced into CS2009, a mainstream Microsoft e-commerce product • Enables a broader set of less sophisticated users govern a production quality set of channels • Uses existing habits in the Microsoft-user world to lower the barrier to entry • Enables a more streamlined experience between marketing and technology

  31. introducing Commerce Server 2009

  32. What’s New In CS2009? For site designers Standards-based design with new design tools • Standardized creation and editing of site designs • New tools and technology • Pre-built components for rapid site creation For developers and architects New multi-channel unified foundation, web parts, new extensibility model • Out-of-the-box site functionality: web parts • Unified programming model • Clear separation between business and presentation layers • New extensibility points • Additional.NET 3.5-based shopping features built-in

  33. What ‘s New In CS2009? For your shoppers and purchasers Better experience • Contemporary out-of-the-box e-commerce site For merchandisers & marketers Website-based information and presentation management • On-the-site product information editing • CS2009 templates for presentation management • Web set up of different “channels” For IT professionals Unified interaction surface for different integrated business systems • Unified surface to interact with all your product systems

  34. Catalog Product Query Product Detail Display Images Viewer Site Map Orders Add to Cart Shopping Cart Mini-cart Checkout Order Details Order History My Lists My List Details Management Channel Configuration* Property List Selection Product Provider Inline Product Editing** New SharePoint Commerce Services and Web Parts Marketing • Advertisements and Discounts • Virtual Earth Store Locator • Reviews and Ratings (2 web parts) Search • Search Box • Search Results and Paging (2 web parts) Profiles • Address List • Address Detail • Credit Card List • Credit Card Detail • My Profile • Registration Wizard • Change, Forgot Password (2 web parts) • Live ID* * These items are technically not Web Parts, but they use SharePoint controls and are available in the Default site or can be integrated into other sites.

  35. Commerce Server 2009 Schematic “Mobile” Template Contemporary Template Custom UX: Customize Web Parts OR Direct to CS2009 Commerce Foundation Live! Services “Color-Neutral” Template Site Templates Commerce Server 2009 SharePoint Commerce Services* Site Management Channel Mgmt Presentation Mgmt Information Mgmt Workflow Commerce Server 2009 Default Web Site* Commerce Server IT Pro and Designer Tools Commerce Server 2009 Web Parts E.g.: Shopping, Checkout, Profile, … Commerce Server 2009 Multi-Channel Commerce Foundation Unified run-time calling model, meta data Multi-Channel Awareness Core e-Commerce Shopping Features Commerce Server Business Management Tools Catalog Manager, Marketing Manager, Customer & Order Manager Custom Logic Commerce Server Core Systems Catalog, Orders, Profiles, Marketing, Analytics, Staging, Web Services, BizTalk Adaptors * SharePoint installation required

  36. Commerce Foundation

  37. Commerce Foundation: Extensibility points • Commerce Entities • Encapsulates a single business concept such as a product or a catalog • Encapsulates both properties and relationships • Can be extended to include new properties and new relationships • Supported by meta data that provides descriptive information about the Commerce Entity that can be retrieved via the API. • Operations • Provides CRUD capabilities on Commerce Entities • Consists of one or more Operation Sequences • May be extended • The response of the operation may be extended • Operation Sequences • Operation Sequences can be plugged/unplugged on a per-channel basis • Out-of-the-box Operation Sequences can be replaced by custom ones • Operation Sequences are reusable components that can be created and reused on other projects • Third parties may create new operations that may be purchased rather than custom built

  38. Message Flow Web Browser Mobile Application Etc... Presentation Tools Presentation Tools Presentation Public API Broker Operation Application CS Sub Systems Operation Sequence Operation Sequence Operation Sequence Operation Sequence Data Cloud Services SQL Server

  39. Commerce Entities Overview • Commerce Server 2009 exposes a single generic class which represents all Commerce Server entities called a “CommerceEntity” • Commerce Server 2009 exposes a single generic class which represents all Commerce Server entities called a “CommerceEntity” • Different types of Commerce Entities are distinguished by the “ModelName” property • Example query: • var productQuery = new Query<CommerceEntity>(“Product”); • productQuery.Properties.Add(“Id”); • productQuery.Properties.Add(“DisplayName”); • productQuery.SearchCriteria.Model.Properties.Add(“Id”, “1243”); • productQuery.SearchCriteria.Model.Properties.Add(“CatalogId”,”Adventure Works Catalog”); • Response response = OperationServiceAgent.ProcessRequest(requestContext, productQuery.ToRequest())

  40. Operation-Based Programming Model • Operations span all Commerce Server sub systems: • Catalog • Orders • Profiles • Marketing • New operations can be created that communicate with other non-Commerce Server services: • Other Microsoft products • Non-Microsoft products • Cloud-based services

  41. demo Multi-Channel Commerce Foundation Scott Cairney

  42. Web Parts: SharePoint Integration • UI Components built as ASP.NET 3.5 Web Parts, providing a number of significant advantages: • Web part connections can be used to marshal requests to Commerce Server • Web parts may be made aware of the zone on a page in which they can reside • Web parts may be personalized by an end user • Web parts can be arranged on a page by a business user in the browser using Windows SharePoint Services or Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

  43. Web Parts:Customization – XSL Transforms Multi-Channel Foundation SharePoint Site • XSL transforms stored in a template • Templates may be managed in a document library when the web part is used with SharePoint • Allows multiple templates to be built, tested and applied by a business user Results Query Query HTML Product Query Web Part Properties HTML XSLT Template Product XML Template Document Library

  44. demo Commerce Server Contemporary Site Preview Scott Cairney

  45. demo Business User Experience Jean-Yves Martineau

  46. © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

  47. © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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