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SNOW LEOPARD

SNOW LEOPARD

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SNOW LEOPARD

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  1. Scientific Classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Carnivora Family: Felidae Subfamily: Pantherinae Genus: Uncia Species: U. uncia SNOW LEOPARD By Rip Ballinger

  2. Contents • Interesting facts and figures • The Ecosystem • Code of Ethics • Children's Story • Bibliography

  3. Interesting facts and figures • The snow leopard is found on rugged mountains between 2500 to 5500 metres above sea level. It is found in Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia and Tajikistan. • The main reason that the snow leopard are endangered is that they are hunted for their beautiful fur. • The snow leopard has the longest tail of all cats and it aids their balance and speed. • Snow leopards are smaller than other big cats, with a length of 100cm-150cm and about 60cm-70cm in height. Their tail adds an extra 70cm-80cm to the length. The snow leopards tail is used not only for mobility but for warmth. • Snow leopards have the ability to jump 15m horizontally and 7m vertically. • Snow leopard weigh about 70-90kg for a male and 50-70kg for a female leopard. Snow leopards cannot roar or purr but instead hiss, growl and wail. Red=Snow leopard range

  4. Ecosystems Depending on which of the bubbles that would be taken away it would have different outcomes for the snow leopard. If you took away its diet the snow leopard would soon become extinct. If the predators box were to be taken away then the snow leopard may thrive or die out as the domestic animals that it preys on are also taken away with the farmers.

  5. Do not buy leopard skin or fur products, it will only encourage poachers. Do not let your animals graze on a mountain with known leopard populations. Do everything that you can to help prevent global warming; turn off lights when they are not being used, unplug your computer when it has full battery. Global warming is forcing tree lines on mountains up, leaving the snow leopards with less rocky bare mountain as they live above the tree line. The snow leopards can’t move up the mountain due to lack of oxygen. Don’t buy musk perfume, it is made from the musk deer that the snow leopard heavily relies on it for its diet. Don’t take traditional Chinese medicine if it was made from snow leopard bones. Code Of Ethics

  6. Snow Leopard Once there were two snow leopards living happily among the rocky mountains of Afghanistan. Their names were Mark and Rolf. One day they decided to go hunting for dinner. They waited until nightfall and then set out down the mountain. They were having a good night, they had already caught three blue sheep between them. As they rounded a big boulder near the top of the tree line they were shocked to find the rest of the trees had shifted up the mountain another 1000 metres! ‘This must be due to global warming’ thought Rolf. Why wouldn’t the humans try and do something! Rolf gave a low wail (snow leopard’s can’t roar). The trees were a nuisance. They grew into the windows of the leopards house, traps could be set in the forest. That was why the snow leopards chose to live above the tree line in the first place! Now that the trees where further up the mountain and the leopard could not move up above them ( the oxygen levels in the air are dangerously thin the further above sea level) they were in a awkward position. Mark and Rolf debated what they would do. Eventually they came to silence, thinking hard sitting on their fluffy tails. The snow leopards tail is the longest tail of all cats. Together they wrapped themselves up in their scarf like tails, now snug and warm and set off back to home. They had enough food to last them a winter so for now they were safe.

  7. Bibliography • http://www.wwf.org.uk/what_we_do/safeguarding_the_natural_world/wildlife/snow_leopard/ • http://www.wwf.org.uk/what_we_do/safeguarding_the_natural_world/wildlife/snow_leopard/?5688/Snow-leopards-and-prey-thriving-in-Bhutans-protected-areas • http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/snowleopard/fact.php • http://www.sandiegozoo.org/animalbytes/t-snow_leopard.html • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_leopard • http://www.snowleopardconcervancy.org/text/how/range.htm?gclid=CInWw6DQ94CFU116wodnFbHKA