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Units 1-2 Review

Units 1-2 Review

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Units 1-2 Review

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  1. Units 1-2 Review 8000 BCE—600 CE

  2. 1. The Paleolithic Age refers to • the period at which agriculture was developed. • the period in which simple stone tools were developed. • the period before the full development of the homo sapiens species. • the period before people learned how to communicate. • the latest of the two stone ages.

  3. 1. The Paleolithic Age refers to • the period at which agriculture was developed. • the period in which simple stone tools were developed. • the period before the full development of the homo sapiens species. • the period before people learned how to communicate. • the latest of the two stone ages.

  4. 2. A characteristic of the human species before the advent of civilization was • the ability to spread to various geographic settings and climate zones. • the ability to organize large political units. • the inability to communicate about abstractions such as death. • that all tasks were shared equally by men and women. • land ownership was equal.

  5. 2. A characteristic of the human species before the advent of civilization was • the ability to spread to various geographic settings and climate zones. • the ability to organize large political units. • the inability to communicate about abstractions such as death. • that all tasks were shared equally by men and women. • land ownership was equal.

  6. 3. The Neolithic revolution occurred first in • Egypt. • the Middle East. • Central America. • China. • India.

  7. 3. The Neolithic revolution occurred first in • Egypt. • the Middle East. • Central America. • China. • India.

  8. 4. A society is almost certainly a civilization if • it practices sedentary agriculture. • it involves tool use. • it has religious rituals. • it has some political structure. • it gathers food to survive.

  9. 4. A society is almost certainly a civilization if • it practices sedentary agriculture. • it involves tool use. • it has religious rituals. • it has some political structure. • it gathers food to survive.

  10. 5. The development of writing • resulted from new technologies, notably the invention of paper. • helps explain why agriculture could develop. • helps explain why governments could become more formal and bureaucratic. • resulted from the needs of the various river valley civilizations to communicate with one another. • was unusual in an agricultural society.

  11. 5. The development of writing • resulted from new technologies, notably the invention of paper. • helps explain why agriculture could develop. • helps explain why governments could become more formal and bureaucratic. • resulted from the needs of the various river valley civilizations to communicate with one another. • was unusual in an agricultural society.

  12. 6. Egypt differed from Mesopotamian civilization by stressing • well-organized, durable empires. • extensive trade. • firm religious beliefs. • greater social equality. • more modest building projects.

  13. 6. Egypt differed from Mesopotamian civilization by stressing • well-organized, durable empires. • extensive trade. • firm religious beliefs. • greater social equality. • more modest building projects.

  14. 7. Which river valley civilization was most completely destroyed by natural disasters such as climate change? • Hwanghe • Indus • Nile • Tigris-Euphrates • Mekong

  15. 7. Which river valley civilization was most completely destroyed by natural disasters such as climate change? • Hwanghe • Indus • Nile • Tigris-Euphrates • Mekong

  16. 8. Why did the original inhabitants of Australia not develop agriculture? • Australian soil was too barren to grow crops. • The Australian climate was too severe. • They were too isolated to learn of developments elsewhere until recently. • Australia never experienced an ice age. • They were prevented from doing so by the Neolithic revolution.

  17. 8. Why did the original inhabitants of Australia not develop agriculture? • Australian soil was too barren to grow crops. • The Australian climate was too severe. • They were too isolated to learn of developments elsewhere until recently. • Australia never experienced an ice age. • They were prevented from doing so by the Neolithic revolution.

  18. 9. A “dynasty” in Chinese history was • any emperor who lasted more than two decades. • a family that passed the imperial title from generation to generation. • powerful bureaucrats who ran the state. • big business families who monopolized overseas trade. • kings dominated by foreign interests.

  19. 9. A “dynasty” in Chinese history was • any emperor who lasted more than two decades. • a family that passed the imperial title from generation to generation. • powerful bureaucrats who ran the state. • big business families who monopolized overseas trade. • kings dominated by foreign interests.

  20. 10. The “Son of Heaven” concept was designed to promote all of the following EXCEPT • loyalty to the emperor. • centralization of power in the state. • priests’ control of the state. • the remoteness of emperor from subjects. • an explanation of the decline of dynasties.

  21. 10. The “Son of Heaven” concept was designed to promote all of the following EXCEPT • loyalty to the emperor. • centralization of power in the state. • priests’ control of the state. • the remoteness of emperor from subjects. • an explanation of the decline of dynasties.

  22. 11. The Qin dynasty differed from the Zhou in that • it lasted longer. • it practiced Confucianism. • it was more centralized. • it was defeated by invading Huns. • it eventually declined and fell.

  23. 11. The Qin dynasty differed from the Zhou in that • it lasted longer. • it practiced Confucianism. • it was more centralized. • it was defeated by invading Huns. • it eventually declined and fell.

  24. 12. Which of the following was a Confucian belief? • Change should be encouraged and modeled by the emperor. • A good society has a hierarchy both in family and state. • Merchants must be valued for their money-making skills. • Governments must not interfere with individual rights. • People of all social classes and abilities should be actively involved in government.

  25. 12. Which of the following was a Confucian belief? • Change should be encouraged and modeled by the emperor. • A good society has a hierarchy both in family and state. • Merchants must be valued for their money-making skills. • Governments must not interfere with individual rights. • People of all social classes and abilities should be actively involved in government.

  26. 13. Daoists would agree with Confucianists on all of the following EXCEPT • the importance of political activity. • scorn for greed. • basic harmony of nature. • importance of restraint in personal life. • the importance of tradition.

  27. 13. Daoists would agree with Confucianists on all of the following EXCEPT • the importance of political activity. • scorn for greed. • basic harmony of nature. • importance of restraint in personal life. • the importance of tradition.

  28. 14. Women in Han Chinese society • could rise to the level of the emperor but only if they had no children. • sometimes become quite powerful in a household. • tended to be poor and were sometimes sold into slavery. • tended to marry much younger men. • would not have children until much older.

  29. 14. Women in Han Chinese society • could rise to the level of the emperor but only if they had no children. • sometimes become quite powerful in a household. • tended to be poor and were sometimes sold into slavery. • tended to marry much younger men. • would not have children until much older.

  30. 15. A famous example of “cultural diffusion” in early Chinese history was • the spread of paper-making technology from the Middle East. • the use of the iron plow from Rome. • the development of written Mandarin Chinese characters. • the introduction and spread of Buddhism from India. • the use of the chariot which was brought in by the Mongols.

  31. 15. A famous example of “cultural diffusion” in early Chinese history was • the spread of paper-making technology from the Middle East. • the use of the iron plow from Rome. • the development of written Mandarin Chinese characters. • the introduction and spread of Buddhism from India. • the use of the chariot which was brought in by the Mongols.

  32. 16. Which of the following groups was considered “low standing” in official Chinese social hierarchy? • Students • Merchants • Peasants • Scholars • Soldiers

  33. 16. Which of the following groups was considered “low standing” in official Chinese social hierarchy? • Students • Merchants • Peasants • Scholars • Soldiers

  34. 17. The Aryan conquerors brought to India • its first civilization. • distinctive religious ideas. • admiration for India’s earlier inhabitants. • new agricultural techniques. • political democracy.

  35. 17. The Aryan conquerors brought to India • its first civilization. • distinctive religious ideas. • admiration for India’s earlier inhabitants. • new agricultural techniques. • political democracy.

  36. 18. The Indian caste system served to an extent as a political institution by • enforcing rules about social behavior. • unifying the subcontinent under a single government. • creating widespread interest in constitutional issues. • promoting a belief in individual rights. • causing unrest and rebellion.

  37. 18. The Indian caste system served to an extent as a political institution by • enforcing rules about social behavior. • unifying the subcontinent under a single government. • creating widespread interest in constitutional issues. • promoting a belief in individual rights. • causing unrest and rebellion.

  38. 19. Hinduism urged that • withdrawal from the world was the only path to holiness. • Brahmins would automatically gain nirvana after death. • all living creatures participated in the divine essence. • worship of nature’s spirits and images was blasphemous. • monotheism was superior to polytheism.

  39. 19. Hinduism urged that • withdrawal from the world was the only path to holiness. • Brahmins would automatically gain nirvana after death. • all living creatures participated in the divine essence. • worship of nature’s spirits and images was blasphemous. • monotheism was superior to polytheism.

  40. 20. Buddhism differed from Hinduism by not believing • in the caste system. • in holy leaders. • in nirvana. • in the importance of moral obligations. • in spreading the faith.

  41. 20. Buddhism differed from Hinduism by not believing • in the caste system. • in holy leaders. • in nirvana. • in the importance of moral obligations. • in spreading the faith.

  42. 21. “Nirvana” meant • full union with the divine essence. • reincarnation in a higher caste after a good life. • the Hindu holy book. • obedience to the rules of the caste system. • acquiring earthly wealth.

  43. 21. “Nirvana” meant • full union with the divine essence. • reincarnation in a higher caste after a good life. • the Hindu holy book. • obedience to the rules of the caste system. • acquiring earthly wealth.

  44. 22. Nalanda became famous for • being the first capital of the Gupta Empire. • its university that attracted students from all over Asia. • being the site where Buddha became enlightened. • site of battle between Alexander the Great and the Guptas. • being the birthplace of Ashoka and his capital.

  45. 22. Nalanda became famous for • being the first capital of the Gupta Empire. • its university that attracted students from all over Asia. • being the site where Buddha became enlightened. • site of battle between Alexander the Great and the Guptas. • being the birthplace of Ashoka and his capital.

  46. 23. Compared to China, India • lacked regional diversity and was more centralized. • had greater contact with other societies and civilizations. • had a more flexible social structure that gave a greater role for women. • was more secular in outlook with a focus on commercial values. • had much more recent origins due to the invasion of the Aryans.

  47. 23. Compared to China, India • lacked regional diversity and was more centralized. • had greater contact with other societies and civilizations. • had a more flexible social structure that gave a greater role for women. • was more secular in outlook with a focus on commercial values. • had much more recent origins due to the invasion of the Aryans.

  48. 24. In the classical period, both China and India • showed considerable tolerance for different religions. • attempted to conquer the most territory possible. • developed a lasting tradition of strong, centralized government. • welcomed influences from other cultures. • created cultural traditions which rapidly died off.

  49. 24. In the classical period, both China and India • showed considerable tolerance for different religions. • attempted to conquer the most territory possible. • developed a lasting tradition of strong, centralized government. • welcomed influences from other cultures. • created cultural traditions which rapidly died off.