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  1. AUT - LATENT 2010 seminar 30 September 2010 E-learning in PracticeTechnologies and Tools for Transforming Learning Peter Olaf Looms

  2. Topics for this session • Teaching and learning with ICT? • What’s in it… • for the student • for the teacher • for the institution and • For other key stakeholders? • What approaches to introducing e-learning make sense? Example: podcasting at the IT University of Copenhagen

  3. Topics for this session • Teaching and learning with ICT?

  4. The first digital media (digits = fingers)

  5. Counting and maths Tallies (digital)

  6. Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

  7. What’s the difference between learning and e-learning?

  8. This is called e-learning… A class of students with PCs. Who is the guy at the front?

  9. and so is this… A group of students working individually on their PCs Is this photo from an ad or one of people actually working?

  10. e-learning: image problems Recognise the sinking feeling of seeing yet another PowerPoint presentation?

  11. e-learning: image problems E-learning – sleep drug without side-effects?

  12. e-learning: characteristics What about this? Staged or real? What characteristics are there of e-learning?

  13. Is this e-learning? Does putting the book on an e-book reader make it e-learning? Perhaps

  14. Is this e-learning? Virtual reality simulator

  15. Is this e-learning? Where does simulation stop and e-learning start?

  16. Is this e-learning? • Observing and analysing phenomena that are • very fast or slow • big or very small • one-off events • dangerous • expensive • social in nature Does video have a role to play in e-learning?

  17. Is this e-learning? Who is the grey-haired lady on the top left?

  18. Is this e-learning? A teacher at Soutwest High School in Jacksonville, N.C., said the special cellphones helped students improve their math skills.

  19. Are these e-learning? What about the boy on the right and the teenagers with their console game? Is this out-of-school e-learning?

  20. Is this e-learning? Do kids learn anything from playing this game?

  21. Communication Asynchronous Communication Synchronous Communication

  22. Co-located Communication (dialogue) Virtual Communication (on the phone) Out of band distribution of programme listings Communication

  23. Communication Information Asynchronous, virtual E-mail, voice mail Databases www,Wikis Social Media Library Asynchronous, co-located books Communication Synchronous, virtual Telephone Skype Chat/IM Video conference Collaborativeworking Socrates Synchronous, co-located Dialogue

  24. 1. e-learning What are your own conclusions about the nature of e-learning at this point? What points from this section are worth making a note of for future reference?

  25. 2. The pros and cons of e-learning • What is e-learning? • What’s in it for me? • student • teacher • Institution • Other key stakeholders

  26. The pros and cons of e-learning …For students • Convenience (”The 7-eleven of learning” – always open)

  27. The pros and cons of e-learning …For students • Flexibility (caters for a wide range of interests and competencies) although flexibility requires a degree of maturity to exploit well.

  28. The pros and cons of e-learning …For students • Education by stealth. Tony Bates (2009) Students acquire many core ICT skills through their learning in other content domains.

  29. The pros and cons of e-learning …For teachers • Potential for doing a more effective job as teacher

  30. The pros and cons of e-learning …For teachers • Potential for doing a more effective job as teacher • Risk of increased preparation time to do things differently. T T Burning the midnight oil

  31. The pros and cons of e-learning 19% of Kiwis are working more than 50 hours a week. Linley Boniface. ”Open All Hours”. Pages 16-20, New Zealand Listener May 12 2007. Burning the midnight oil

  32. The pros and cons of e-learning …For management • The Holy Grail of cost-efficiency - ”more for less” • Improved (global) reach • Status and rankings (local, national and international)

  33. 2. The pros and cons of e-learning What are your own conclusions about the pros and cons of e-learning at this point? What points from this section are worth making a note of for future reference?

  34. 3. e-learning: approaches • What is e-learning? • What’s in it for me? • student • teacher • institution • What approaches to introducing e-learning make sense?

  35. 3. e-learning: approaches

  36. Every man for himself 3. e-learning: approaches

  37. 3. e-learning: approaches FORMAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT Workingtogether

  38. Every man for himself 3. e-learning: approaches FORMAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT Workingtogether

  39. Change ManagementKotter’s eight change phases model • Establish a sense of urgency • Create a coalition • Develop a clear vision • Share the vision • Empower people to clear obstacles • Secure short-term wins • Consolidate and keep moving • Anchor the change

  40. 3. e-learning: expectation management approachesmanagement

  41. Four quadrant expectation management Explicit expectations External Stakeholders Internal Stakeholders Implicit expectations Source: Kirti Vaidya, Senior director, Covansys ” Four quadrant expectation management” 15 May 2005 www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/may05/vaidya/index.html

  42. Four quadrant expectation management Explicit expectations Agreements: Delivering the goods On time and Within budget Staff agreements: Salary Working hours and conditions External Stakeholders Internal Stakeholders Staff expectations: Of managers Of colleagues Of students Working conditions Career prospects Job satisfaction Stakeholder expectations: Outcomes Processes Meeting organisational objectives Implicit expectations Source: Kirti Vaidya, Senior director, Covansys ” Four quadrant expectation management” 15 May 2005 www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/may05/vaidya/index.html

  43. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition

  44. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition Stakeholders • Who needs podcasts? • mature students on part-time courses • young students on full-time students • those thinking of taking a course at ITU • full-time academic staff (teaching) • part-time external lecturers • university management and admin.

  45. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition Students • What do students need? • a simple and easy-to-use means of • catching up on things missed due to • absence or illness

  46. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition Teachers • What do lecturers need? • a simple and easy-to-use means of • catching up on things missed due to • absence or illness • something that does not impact classes • in terms of teaching and preparation time.

  47. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition Management & admin. • What does management want? • cost-efficiency • increased reach locally, nationally • or even internationally • ”intangible” benefits such as improved • status and ranking • no hassle with staff or students.

  48. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition • Master’s students in project management and digital media • Case work in groups of 3-4 for 8 weeks (40 students, 100 hours each) • Report for a pilot project for podcasts in all modules of a part-time • Master’s programme in Interaction Design and MM (business case • and Project Initiation Document, PID for pilot) • Inputs: recorded interviews with key stakeholders, background • documents for ITU and elsewhere on podcasts.

  49. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition • Students • Get to work with authentic case. • Can apply theory, methods and tools to something they have tried • themselves

  50. Presenting your ideas: the NABC model Needs Approach Benefits Competition • Lecturers • ”The wisdom of crowds” - 10 groups in 2 semesters come up with • a wider range of validated solutions than the academic staff had done • in three years • Ethical – the students were told of the rules of the activity • before they began and gave their consent.