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Universal Design

Universal Design

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Universal Design

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  1. Universal Design The Principles

  2. Overview • Topic 2.0. Introduction to Universal Design • Topic 2.1. Equitable Use • Topic 2.2. Flexibility in Use • Topic 2.3. Simple and Intuitive • Topic 2.4. Perceptible Information • Topic 2.5. Tolerance for Error • Topic 2.6. Low Physical Effort • Topic 2.7. Size and Space for Approach and Use • Topic 2.8. The Principles in Action

  3. Topic 2.0.Introduction toUniversal Design

  4. Universal Design • Inclusive Design • Design for All • User Needs Design • User-Centred Design • Human-Centred Design • Barrier-Free Design • Accessible Design • Adaptable Design • Transgenerational design • Design for a Broader Average

  5. Universal Design • Universal Design is the design and composition of an environment so that it can be accessed, understood and used to the greatest extent possible by all people regardless of their age, size or disability • Irish Disability Act, 2005

  6. Universal Design • Universal Design is the design and composition of an environment so that it can be accessed, understood and used to the greatest extent possible by all people regardless of their age, size or disability • Irish Disability Act, 2005

  7. Universal Design • Universal design is an approach to design that honours human diversity. It addresses the right for everyone – from childhood into their oldest years – to use all spaces, products and information, in an independent, inclusive and equal way. It is a process that invites designers to go beyond compliance with access codes, to create excellent, people centred design. • Elaine Ostroff

  8. The Principles of Universal Design • Equitable Use • Flexibility in Use • Simple and Intuitive • Perceptible Information • Tolerance for Error • Low Physical Effort • Size and Space for Approach and Use

  9. Universal Design • In this lecture we are going to explore a new way to look at design to allow as many people as possible to benefit from the design. • This is Universal Design

  10. Topic 2.1. Equitable Use

  11. The design is useful and marketable to any group of users Principle 1: Equitable Use Provide the same means of use for all users: identical whenever possible; equivalent when not Avoid segregating or stigmatising any users Provisions for privacy, security and safety should be equally available to all users Make the design appealing to all users

  12. Can everyone use the same entrance? Principle 1: Equitable Use

  13. Does the design provide the same means of use for all? Principle 1: Equitable Use

  14. Does the design provide the same means of use for all? Principle 1: Equitable Use

  15. Topic 2.2. Flexibility in Use

  16. The design accommodates a range of individual preferences and abilities. Principle 2: Flexibility in Use Provide choice in method of use Accommodate right-handed or left-handed access and use Facilitate the user’s accuracy and precision Provide adaptability to the user’s pace

  17. Does the design provide choice in method of use? Principle 2: Flexibility in Use

  18. Does the park seating accommodate individual preference? Principle 2: Flexibility in Use

  19. Does the furniture adapt to people’s needs and abilities? Principle 2: Flexibility in Use

  20. Can the design be used by left and right handed people? Principle 2: Flexibility in Use

  21. Does the design work well for children, adults and older people? Principle 2: Flexibility in Use

  22. Topic 2.3. Simple and Intuitive

  23. Use of the design is easy to understand regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level. Principle 3: Simple and Intuitive Eliminate unnecessary complexity Be consistent with user expectations and intuition Accommodate a wide range of literacy and language skills Arrange information consistent with its importance Provide effective prompting and feedback during and after task completion

  24. Is it easy to understand? Can you make it work? Principle 3: Simple and Intuitive

  25. Is it easy to understand? Can you make it work? Principle 3: Simple and Intuitive

  26. Topic 2.4. Perceptible Information

  27. The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities. Principle 4: Perceptible Information Use different modes (pictorial, verbal, tactile) for redundant presentation of essential information Provide adequate contrast between essential information and its surroundings Maximize ‘legibility’ of essential information and its surroundings Differentiate elements in ways that can be described (i.e. make it easy to give instructions or directions) Provide compatibility with a variety of techniques or devices used by people with sensory limitations

  28. Does the design use different modes for presentation? Principle 4: Perceptible Information

  29. Does the environment help you find your way? Principle 4: Perceptible Information

  30. Does the environment help you find your way? Principle 4: Perceptible Information

  31. Principle 4:Perceptible Information Are there different ways to enjoy the experience? Principle 4: Perceptible Information

  32. Topic 2.5. Tolerance for Error

  33. The design minimises hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions. Principle 5: Tolerance for Error Arrange elements to minimise hazards and errors: most used elements, most accessible; hazardous elements eliminated, isolated or shielded Provide warnings of hazards and errors Provide fail safe features Discourage unconscious action in tasks that require vigilance

  34. Are there unexpected level changes? Principle 5: Tolerance for Error

  35. Can you work safely without toxic fumes? Principle 5: Tolerance for Error

  36. How can you tell when the water is hot? Principle 5: Tolerance for Error

  37. Is it safe to handle? Principle 5: Tolerance for Error

  38. Topic 2.6. Low Physical Effort

  39. The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue Principle 6: Low Physical Effort Allow user to maintain a neutral body position Use reasonable operating forces Minimise repetitive actions Minimise sustained physical effort

  40. Does the design help minimise the effort needed? Principle 6: Low Physical Effort

  41. Can you easily reach and use home products? Principle 6: Low Physical Effort

  42. Topic 2.7. Size and Space for Approach and Use

  43. Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture, or mobility. Principle 7: Size and Space for Approach and Use Provide a clear line of sight to important elements for any seated or standing user Make reach to all components comfortable for any seated or standing user Accommodate variations in hand and grip size Provide adequate space for the use of assistive devices or personal assistance

  44. Is there room to manoeuvre? Principle 7: Size and Space for Approach and Use

  45. Is there space to examine the art exhibit? Principle 7: Size and Space for Approach and Use

  46. Can you use the campsite or get onto the boat? Principle 7: Size and Space for Approach and Use

  47. Topic 2.8. The Principles in Action

  48. Universal Design Universal design caters for many users, irrelevant of gender, age, size, strength, mobility, hearing, vision etc. Good design enables, bad design disables.

  49. Top 10 Myths and Misconceptions • Universal Design is one size fits all • Universal Design aims to replace the design of products targeted at specific markets • Universal Design will reduce the number of products available on the market • Universal Design is a synonym for the compliance with accessible design standards • Only disabled and elderly people benefit from Universal Design • Universal Design aims to replace assistive technology • Universal Design is a trend • Universally Designed products are aesthetically unattractive • Universal Design can be achieved by specialist designers only • Universal Design can be applied at the end of the design process • BONUS MYTH! If a Universally Designed product is not achievable it is not worth trying at all

  50. Conclusions • Diversity is the norm • Universal design celebrates human differences • Universal design markets usability, not disability • Ageing consumers have great economic power • Universal design offers a blueprint for designing a world fit for all people • Universal design recognises the interdependence of humanity, the natural world, and the products of human design