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Active and Eating Smart

Active and Eating Smart

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Active and Eating Smart

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  1. Iowans Fit for Life Active and Eating Smart • Julie McMahon, Director • Division of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Iowa Department of Public Health

  2. 1991 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS,1991, 1996, 2003 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) 1996 2003 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  3. Stats • An estimated 61% of Iowa adults are overweight (BMI > 25) or obese (BMI > 30)--BRFSS (2002) • An estimated 16 percent of children and adolescents ages 6 –19 years are overweight—based on BMI, (1999 –2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (> Greater or equal to)

  4. BRFSS: Percent Obesity by Gender By Gender

  5. BRFSS: Percent Obesity by Age Age Groups

  6. BRFSS: Percent Obesity by Educational Level Educational Level

  7. BRFSS: Percent Obesity by Income Level Income Level

  8. 16 16 16 14 12 10 Ages 12-19 8 6 5 4 4 Ages 6-11 2 0 1963- 1971-74 1976-80 1988-94 1999- 70** 2002 Percentage of Overweight U.S. Children and Adolescents is Soaring* 18 * >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts **Data from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age Source: National Center for Health Statistics

  9. Overweight Has Important Health Consequences in Children • 70% chance of being overweight as adults • Childhood onset of Type 2 diabetes • Face future risk of serious complications: kidney disease, blindness, amputations • People born in 2000 have a high risk of getting diabetes in their lifetimes: • 33% of males • 39% of females • Risk factors for heart disease • 60% of 5-10-year olds have at least one • 25% have two or more CDC Data

  10. Costs Associated with Obesity are High and Growing • 2000 estimated cost: $117 billion: • $61 billion direct medical costs • $56 billion for indirect costs • Iowan’s spent estimated $783 million • $363 million paid by taxpayers (Medicare and Medicaid) • Hospital costs related to childhood overweight have tripled in last 20 years

  11. Three Key Factors are Related to the Onset of Obesity • Poor dietary practices • Decreased physical activity • Increased inactivity (CDC)

  12. Americans’ Food Practices are Shifting Dramatically • Reduced frequency of family meals • Increased fast food consumption • Increased portion size • Increased consumption of soft drinks (from 27 to 44 gallons/year from 1972-1992) • Restrained eating, meal skipping • 30,000 products in supermarkets (CDC)

  13. Physical Education in Schoolsis on the Decline Participation in daily P.E. classes, 9-12th graders: 1991 42% 1999 29% (CDC)

  14. (0-1) (1-2) (2-3) (3-4) (4-5) (>5) As TV Time Increases, So Does Rate of Overweight in Teenagers TV Hours Per Day (Youth Report) (NHES Youth Aged 12-17 in 1967-70 and NLSY Youth Aged 10-15 in 1990)

  15. CDC-funded State Nutrition and Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases • Capacity building • 2004-2005-current • 2005-2006-applied • Implementation, application to CDC • 2006….

  16. CDC-funded NPA Program Year 1-2: • Bring together partners to write the State Comprehensive Plan. • Implement a pilot intervention • Submit the State Plan and application to become an implementation state.

  17. Iowans Fit for Life Vision Iowans will enjoy balanced nutrition, lead physically active lives and live in healthy communities

  18. Iowans Fit for Life Mission Develop and strengthen partnerships that prevent and reduce obesity in Iowa

  19. Goals/Outcomes Iowans Fit for Life • Prevent and reduce obesity in Iowans through improved nutrition, physical activity and supportive environments. • Reduce obesity through integration, coordination and collaboration among organizations and entities that share expertise and maximize resources of existing programs and partnerships.

  20. Strategies Iowans Fit for Life Develop and support partnerships that implement obesity prevention programs

  21. Strategies Iowans Fit for Life Create and sustain model healthy communities around nutrition and physical activity.

  22. Strategies Iowans Fit for Life Collect and analyze data that drives decisions about program needs and effectiveness

  23. What needs to be done to develop the Comprehensive State Plan? • Develop Partnerships at the local and state level • Share expertise and maximizes resources of existing programs and partnerships. • Use Iowa-specific data to identify issues and maximize existing public and private resources • Build model healthy community—pilot intervention

  24. Partnerships Work Groups: • Educational Setting • Early Childhood • Older Iowans • Business and Agriculture • Health Care • Community

  25. Iowans Fit for Life Here’s how you can make a difference and get involved… For more Information: www.iowa.gov/iowansfitforlife