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Chapter 8: Providing Good Nutrition in Early Childhood Education Environments

Chapter 8: Providing Good Nutrition in Early Childhood Education Environments. Specific Nutritional Policies. Needed because:

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Chapter 8: Providing Good Nutrition in Early Childhood Education Environments

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  1. Chapter 8: Providing Good Nutrition in Early Childhood Education Environments © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  2. Specific Nutritional Policies • Needed because: • children in child care for more than 8 hours should receive at least one meal and two snacks and should have between 50% and 67% of their nutritional daily intake provided • teachers are being asked to take on the role of nutritional gatekeeper for the hours children are in early childhood education environments © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  3. Specific Nutritional Policies (continued) • What is important? • cost • convenience • culture • purpose of care © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  4. Nutrition Policies Needed for • Early feeding and the infant • Feeding the autonomous toddler • Food and the preschool child • School-age nutrition • Nutrition and the child with special needs © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  5. Early Feeding and the Infant in Care • Breastfeeding • Benefits • providing support to nursing mother • safe and sanitary practices • optimizes cognitive development • Bottle feeding • Formulas • safe and sanitary practices • proper holding techniques • never prop a bottle © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  6. Early Feeding and the Infant in Care (continued) • Feeding pattern • cues • drawing head away from nipple, releasing it, or biting it • sucking stops, might shut mouth tightly • changing posture • being attentive to surroundings and not feeding • Infant-controlled feeding requires caregiver to be attentive to behavior • also to allow amount to vary depending on infant’s needs © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  7. Early Feeding and the Infant in Care (continued) • Introducing solid foods • Feeding pattern to developmental level • start slowly, one new food at a time for 5 to 7 days—this allows for food allergy to appear • Utensils should be small and age appropriate • Only small amounts on tip of spoon • Food placed in small bowl—only enough for one serving © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  8. Early Feeding and the Infant in Care (continued) • Order of introduction • Cereals • Vegetables • Fruits • Other foods • See Table 8-5 © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  9. Early Feeding and the Infant in Care (continued) • Teacher guidelines • Never use food as bribery, diversion, or reward • Try new foods at babies’ best time • Make mealtime pleasant, not distracting • Avoid serving foods that may choke • See Table 8-6 for more guidelines © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  10. Feeding the Autonomous Toddler • Food is the first place toddler shows autonomy/independence • Teacher should • maintain good nutrition while establishing good eating habits • understand growth patterns and develop-mental changes that affect toddlers actions • see Table 8-7 © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  11. Feeding the Autonomous Toddler (continued) • Food as an issue of control • Adult is responsible for food that comes in and how it is presented • Adult is responsible for making sure that child is at meal, is on task, behaves well, and regulates time for meals and snacks • Child is responsible for how much he eats, whether he eats, and how his body turns out © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  12. Feeding the Autonomous Toddler (continued) • The way adult treats a child at mealtime reflects how adult treats child elsewhere • Make mealtime significant to child • Know child’s temperament, tempo, capabilities • Manage eating environment • Set limits as to time and place for eating • Prepare child for transition © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  13. Feeding the Autonomous Toddler (continued) • Child should come to table ready to eat • Sit at the table for a few minutes if not hungry • Child’s choice not to participate—adult reinforces child’s choice • Keep food out of sight • See Tables 8-8 and 8-9 © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  14. Feeding the Autonomous Toddler (continued) • Nutritional considerations • Variation in food consumption • food jags • Milk should have proper place • Not too much juice • Guidelines for good food habits • see Table 6-9 © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  15. Food and the Preschooler • Outside influences • peers, teachers, parents, TV • Positive reinforcement • cereal aisles and negative behavior • Encouraging child participation • selection of food • food preparation © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  16. School-Age Nutrition • Most early education settings for child care are more likely to be involved with snacks and maybe breakfast • Elementary schools are involved in breakfast and lunch • Snacks for after-school care should be substantial and ready when needed © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  17. School-Age Nutrition (continued) • If sack lunches are prepared, the child should be included • Child should be encouraged to under-stand nutrition, select and prepare healthy foods, and have good dietary habits © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  18. Reality Check—Children of the Fast Food Generation • Children are consuming fast food with increasing frequency • mothers in workforce • easy availability • Rise in obesity is related to increased consumption of fast food • Kids favorite fast foods • french fries, pizza, fried chicken, hamburgers, and ketchup © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  19. Reality Check—Children of the Fast Food Generation (continued) • Children get an abundance of fat and sodium and empty calories • Due to children’s increased consumption of fast food, it is important that early childhood education environments provide nutritious meals and help children make better choices © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  20. Reality Check—Children of the Fast Food Generation (continued) • Fast food available • in malls • on main streets • in bowling alleys, at theme parks • on airplanes and cruise ships • at some schools where the fast food chains and soft drink manufacturers sponsor the school in return for marketing their products on campus • California the first state to ban soft drinks to be sold on campuses—a trend © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  21. Nutrition and the Child with Special Needs • Developmental disabilities or chronic illness may affect • feeding skills • equipment needs • feeding procedures • foods and diets • Can child care accommodate these needs? © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  22. Nutrition and the Child with Special Needs (continued) • Respect the child’s food preferences and hunger level as you would with every child • Nutritional goals for the child should be discussed with the family • Keep accurate records of feeding and communicate often with the family © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  23. Implications for Teachers • Education and Role Modeling • For Families • Cultural Competence • cultural influences and food selection • teacher’s cultural perspective © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

  24. Implications for Teachers(continued) • Supervision • Requires skills • selection of healthy food choices; focus on healthy choices and preparation methods • food sanitation and safety practices • Meals from home • monitor for acceptable food choices • proper food storage • Directing mealtime behaviors • Good role-modeling © 2007 by Thomson Delmar Learning

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