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Modular Incubation System

Modular Incubation System

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Modular Incubation System

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  1. Indy Bekerie Annabelle Chu Leeanna Hyacinth Min Ye Shen Kiet Vo BME Senior Design 2011-2012 Preliminary Findings and Business Plan Modular Incubation System Delivering infants a better start | P: 212.854.6196 F: 212.854.8725 351 Engineering Terrace 1210 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10027 IncuVive.weebly.com

  2. Executive Summary • Company Overview • Develop technology to combat infant hypothermia that is viable for low-resource countries • Advisors are leaders in the field of Biomedical Engineering and renown neonatologists with firsthand experience in the field • Market • NGOs, non-profits, and the hospitals of over 100 developing countries • Business Model • Capital equipment model • Design and Development • Overall Plan • Innovative Designs • Proof of Concept 1.0 • Heating sources • Temperature sensors • IncuVive Financial Projections and Key Performance Indicators | P: 212.854.6196 F: 212.854.8725 351 Engineering Terrace 1210 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10027 Incuvive.weebly.com

  3. Company Overview • Our Technology • Will produce the correct amount of heat, maintain temperature • Can be coupled with a crib and cover • Incorporates accurate temperature sensors • Utilizes an innovative feedback mechanism and alarm system • Advantages Over Present Solutions • Feedback Mechanism • Affordable, reliable • Viable for low-resource countries • Advantages Over Other Companies • Few other companies targeting developing countries + = An innovative solution to combat infant hypothermia

  4. The Market ~ 4 million annual infant mortality [3] • 18%-42% caused by hypothermia • 720,000 to 1.68 million of neonate deaths can be prevented annually • ~ 144 developing countries [1] In Uganda • 80 per 1,000 live births [5] • 15 to 18 neonates suffering from hypothermia can be saved Market Strategies Consumers • National and Regional Hospitals • Sub-district hospitals • Other rural healthcare facilities • Uganda • Other developing countries Target Customers • Ministry of Health • NGOs • Donors Neonates | P: 212.854.6196 F: 212.854.8725 351 Engineering Terrace 1210 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10027 [3] UNICEF. Progress for children: a world fit for children statistical review. New York, NY: United Nations Children`s Fund; 2007 [5] Infant mortality rate, Uganda. Google.com/publicdata Incuvive.weebly.com

  5. The Market Our MIS Will • Incorporate a reliable feedback mechanism • Revive current nonfunctional incubators • Convert available cribs to modest incubators Competition Van Hemel Baby Incubator (~ $450) Medicine Mondiale’sLiferaft Incubator (~ $1,500) General Electric (GE) incubators ($15,000-$40,000) Risks and Obstacles Secure funding for production Partnership with the Ministry of Health and the NGO’s Protection of Intellectual Property Larger medical device companies | P: 212.854.6196 F: 212.854.8725 351 Engineering Terrace 1210 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10027

  6. Business Model • IncuVive in Uganda • We plan to follow a capital equipment model. • The National Medical Store will be our main purchaser of our MIS; however, we also plan to sell to NGO and private hospitals. • Each unit will be priced at $50 after subsidizations • Strategic Partnerships • Partnerships with NGOs such as UNICEF, ECHO, and the Gates Foundation will help offset production costs and help sustain a low margin operation. • We will utilize partner distribution channels in order to quickly establish operations in new markets.

  7. Business Model • Expansion and Distribution • Our main source of income will come from market expansion. • Our device will be assembled locally and transported by a third party. • After setting up distribution in Uganda we plan to immediately expand into surrounding countries. www.infoplease.com/atlas/country/uganda.html

  8. Short Term Plan

  9. Design Ideas Heating Mat + PCM • Feedback System • Monitor and display temperature of either mat or environmental temperature • Monitor and display temperature of infant • Automatically adjust heat setting to maintain infant’s temperature in the normal range • Alarm if abnormal temperature readings (too high or too low) • Automatic shut off if temperature is too high to prevent overheating

  10. Design Ideas Space Heater • Feedback System • Monitor and display temperature of either mat or environmental temperature • Monitor and display temperature of infant • Automatically adjust heat setting to maintain infant’s temperature in the normal range • Alarm if abnormal temperature readings (too high or too low) • Automatic shut off if temperature is too high to prevent overheating

  11. Design Ideas Warm Water Pump • Feedback System • Monitor and display temperature of either mat or environmental temperature • Monitor and display temperature of infant • Automatically adjust heat setting to maintain infant’s temperature in the normal range • Alarm if abnormal temperature readings (too high or too low) • Automatic shut off if temperature is too high to prevent overheating

  12. Decision Matrix Methods of Heating

  13. Use phase change material (PCM) between the neonate and the heating unit to prevent burns • Maintain the baby at a temperature of about 37 °C while heating unit is off • Methods • A bag of saline with a thermometer inserted was heated to 37 °C in a water bath. The saline was placed on an inactive mat and allowed to cool down. • The temperature of the saline was recorded every minute with a calibrated thermistor inserted into the saline until the temperature dropped to 34 °C PoC- Saline Bag Control

  14. Results • Methods • The PCM was activated in a microwave, then placed on the inactive mat with thermistors placed at specific locations. • Meanwhile a bag of saline was heated to 35 °C in a water bath and placed on the PCM. • The experiment was repeated with thermistors. PoC- Phase Change Material (PCM)

  15. Saline on PCM Conclusion Saline on PCM with Heating Mat • The PCM cannot raise the saline’s temperature to 37 °C • The PCM can only maintain the saline’s temperature above 35 °C for about one hour with no external heat supply • Other insulating materials

  16. Most viable for • Water: LM34 • Skin: Digital* • Ambient: NTC Temperature Sensors Red spirit

  17. Long Range Plan Apply for funding and grants and start manufacturing Develop extensive rapport with NGOs, WHO, UNICEF Design and build 1st and 2nd prototype Continue development of new products Continue R&D Build final prototype Initiate first assembly station in Uganda Product Selection Proof of Concept testing

  18. Financial Projections

  19. Financial Projections

  20. Estimated Usage of Our Modular Incubation System Estimated MIS Usage projection based on a conservative 10% outreach to all neonatal deaths from hypothermia. A more in-depth explanation is in DS2: Basic summary of problem. As you can see, the curve is sigmoidal and saturated at roughly 72,000 neonates per year. Estimated MIS Usage projection based on a conservative 10% outreach to all neonatal deaths from hypothermia. A more in-depth explanation is in DS2: Basic summary of problem. As you can see, the curve is sigmoidal and saturated at roughly 72,000 neonates per year.

  21. Future Plans • Further testing of the ability of the space heater and warm water pump to raise and maintain the temperature of a saline bag. • Investigate and compare the functionality of other insulating materials. • Begin fabrication of feedback mechanism • Explore alarm system • Finalize what products we will implement • in our Modular Incubation System • Method of Heating • Temperature Sensors • Insulating Material (if necessary)

  22. Acknowledgments • Instructors • Dr. Elizabeth Hillman, Ph.D. , Biomedical Engineering Dept., Columbia University • Dr. Aaron Kyle, Ph.D. , Biomedical Engineering Dept., Columbia University • Mr. Keith Yeager • Sarah De Leo (TA) • Advisers and Consultants • Dr. Lance Kam, Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering Dept., Columbia University • Dr. Margaret Nakakeeto-Kijjambu, MD, Mulago Hospital • Dr. Richard Polin, MD, CUMC Pediatrics • Dr. Rakesh Sahni, MD, CUMC Pediatrics • Dr. Helen Towers, MD, CUMC Pediatrics • Dr. Yvonne Vaucher, MD, UCSD • Dr. David Vallancourt, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering Dept., Columbia University IncuVive.weebly.com