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KL, Dec 3-5, 2007 PowerPoint Presentation
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KL, Dec 3-5, 2007

KL, Dec 3-5, 2007

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KL, Dec 3-5, 2007

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  1. KL, Dec 3-5, 2007

  2. Institutional AdvancementHigher Education Resources in the Post-Industrial Era Kai-ming Cheng The University of Hong Kong Kurla Lumpur, Dec 3-5, 2007

  3. Higher Education Developments • More demand for higher education • Building elite institutions • New expectations on higher learning

  4. 1 Greater Demand on Higher Education

  5. Industrial Society: the Pyramid Higher Education

  6. Industrial Institutions Higher Education Engineers Degrees Diplomas Technicians Vocational Training Craftsmen Operatives Basic Education

  7. Society has changed …

  8. Hong Kong … Around 304,000 registered companies (Sep 2006) 99.3% under 100 (SME) • 69% of employees • 94.3% under 20 • 40% of employees • 87.0% under 10 • 33% of employees • Over 1,000: 110 • Free-lancers 220,000 estimated vis-à-vis 2,200,000 in registered companies • The United States • Business Enterprises • 98% under 100 • 86% under 20 • National Bureau of Economic Research, 2002 • Shanghai (2005/6) • SME: 99.7% • Employees: 86.8% • Total asset: 69.2%

  9. Post-industrial: Workplace On-going processes of • Re-engineering • De-layering • Down-sizing • Out-sourcing • M & A • Closure Project Groups/Task Forces Small Enterprises Free-lancers Higher Education

  10. Hence, Expansion of Higher Education!

  11. 2 Building Elite Institutions

  12. Establishing elite institutions: • China: • Project 211, Project 985 • Pakistan:Major expansion • 11 new elite universities • Thailand:Major expansion • 1 global top-50; 4-5 regional top-50 • South Korea • BK 21 (Brain Korea 21): Top 10 • Taiwan, China • 50B for 5 years • Saudi Arabia • 2 elite universities

  13. 3 Different Expectations on Higher Education

  14. Industrial Large pyramids Producer-centred Departments Hierarchy Tight structure Design at the top Assigned procedures Rules & regulations Post-industrial Small companies Client-centred Project teams Flat Loose & fluid Design at front-lines Improvised actions Fit-for-purpose acts Organisations

  15. Industrial Division of labour Individual tasks Specialist duties Administrative links Credential-based appointments Appraisal by seniors Post-industrial Total solutions Team work Integrated expertise Human interactions On-demand, just-in-time learning 3600 appraisal Working Modes

  16. Industrial Paper work Circulars Minutes Documents Instructions Written reports …… Post-industrial Communications Brainstorming E-mailing SMS Blogs Seminars Debates Conferencing Negotiation Presentation Confrontation Lobbying Retreats Work Activities

  17. Industrial Bottom of the hierarchy Hiring due to credentials Member of a specialised department Implementation of design Using specific skills Routine and repetitive activities Working according to job descriptions Following set procedures Maintaining the convention Abiding by rules and regulations Appraised by degree of compliance Stable and secure Blue collars Post-industrial Member of a small group Hiring due to personality Working in teams Directly facing clients Handling human relations Directly facing problems Anticipating total solutions Designing solutions with creativity Using multiple skills Taking risks Improvising fit-for-purpose activities Managing oneself Learning on-the-job, on-demand, just-in-time Appraised 3600 Unstable, uncertain and insecure Knowledge workers Front-line workers

  18. Industrial Lifelong career Long-term loyalty Occupational identity Work-study consistency Org membership Stable employment Escalating salaries Upward mobility Foreseeable retirement Constant networks Stable relations Security, certainty Post-industrial Multiple careers Multiple jobs Blurred identity Work-study mismatch Possible free-lancing Frequent off-jobs Precarious incomes Fluctuating status Unpredictable future Varying networks Changing partners Insecurity, uncertainty Individual Lives

  19. Industrial Credentials Specialized skills Planning & implementation Navigating the bureaucracy Following the heritage Post-industrial Communications Team-working Human relations Problem-solving Risk-taking Design & innovations Personal responsibility Continuous learning Self-management Ethics, values, principles Expectations …

  20. Baseline Competence Vertical Disciplines Social Capacity Creativity Practical Capacity Theoretical Knowledge

  21. An example … Accounting • Mismatch • Physics, Psychology PhD, Computer Science PhD • Morgan Stanley • “Winning Personality” • Senior Partner Deloitte • “Integrity and sensitivity” • KPMG • More non-accounting graduates • Society of Accountants • “Don’t teach!”

  22. Key competencies • Interacting in socially heterogeneous groups • Acting autonomously • Using tools purposively andinteractively OECD: The Definition and Selection of Competencies: Theoretical and Conceptual FoundationsProject (DeSeCo)

  23. Key competencies (OECD) Interacting in socially heterogeneous groups • The ability to relate well to others • The ability to cooperate • The ability to manage and resolve conflicts

  24. Key competencies (OECD) Acting autonomously • The ability to act within the “big picture” • The ability to form and conduct life plans and personal projects • The ability to defend and assert one’s rights, interests, limits, and needs

  25. Key competencies (OECD) Using tools purposively and interactively • The ability to use language, symbols, and text • The ability to use knowledge and information • The ability to use technology

  26. Hence, Greater variety of Learning Experiences

  27. Lives in Higher Education International Exchange Visits to Rural, Deprived Communities Community Services/NGO Internship, Placement, Mentorship Design, Music, Drama, Sports Executives of Organisations Student Activities/Halls Study Classes

  28. Learning Experiences Learning across Cultures Learning to Care Are we interested in the quality of all these learning experiences in higher education? Learning to Serve Creativity Learning Workplace Learning Leadership Learning Alternative Learning Academic Knowledge Classes

  29. Some Trends in Asia • Unprecedented Expansions • Building Elite Universities • Expanded Student Learning Experiences Who pays?

  30. Dancing with the Private Sector • Fostering higher education philanthropy

  31. 4 Dancing with the Private Sector

  32. Resource Strategies for HE Community Resources Public Money Private Institutions Public Institutions

  33. Public funding no longer adequate for the expanded system • Private participation as a matter of resources strategy

  34. Repositioning the Private Sector…

  35. Enhancing private participation Significance of Private Sector

  36. Enhancing private participation Significance of Private Sector

  37. The blurring boundaries … • Purely public institutions • Government appropriation only • Public institutions • + partial self-financing programs • + projects on competitive basis • + private donations • + commercial incomes • Private institutions • + projects from public sources • + public subsidy to students • Purely private institutions • Tuitions only

  38. Two Sectors? Public Private

  39. Or One Continuum … Public Private

  40. Harvard expenditures • 60% Projects • 65% levy • 30% Tuitions • 55% on scholarship • 10% Donations • 29.2B at 16.7% p.a.

  41. Dancing with private participation • Recognizing private contributions • Blurring the sectoral boundaries • Innovations of private participation • Focusing on learners • Living with the “market” • Moving beyond the civil service ideology • New framework of accountability

  42. 5 Philanthropy in Higher Education

  43. Evolution of Terminology • Fundraising • Resource Development • Institutional Advancement

  44. Institutional Advancement • Mobilizing resources beyond government appropriation • for the advancement of the institution in areas of prime importance • hence enabling the institution to achieve excellence at a higher plane • thereby empowering the institution to enjoy autonomy at a new level

  45. Institutional Advancement • Donation is not charity to the deprived • Donation is partnership with the strong • Donation is endorsement of mission • Donation is recognition of contribution

  46. Higher Education Resources Donations, Endowment Investments Public Appropriation, Subsidies, … Projects, Services, ..

  47. Philanthropy: a different pie Government Appropriation + Learners’ Fees + Projects Government Appropriation Government Appropriation + Learners’ Fees + Projects + Private Donations

  48. Public funding No money, no plan Budget cut, activity reduction Look for small money Ask for money when poor Funding is the limit Doing what we did Steady progress Appropriation Advancement No vision, no money Great vision, big money Look for big money Ask for money when strong Sky is the limit Scaling new planes Advancement Partnership A different paradigm

  49. Why fundraising? • Public appropriation maintains us as just “one of many” • Advancement makes a difference! Advancement = Community Support = Fundraising = Resources Development = Donations

  50. Fundraising: How to do it?