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Chief Officer Training Curriculum

Chief Officer Training Curriculum

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Chief Officer Training Curriculum

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  1. Chief Officer Training Curriculum Operations Module 1: Application of the ICS

  2. Objectives • Identify ICS functions, elements, and responsibilities • Define command presence, assuming command, transferring command, and establishing a Command Post (CP) • Develop a basic ICS organization for an emergency incident • Develop an extended ICS organization for a major emergency incident

  3. Overview • ICS overview • ICS major functions • Command • Operations • Planning • Logistics • Finance/administration • ICS management techniques

  4. History of the ICS • Before 1970: department-specific • Past 30 years: • FIRESCOPE ICS • Fire Ground Command (FGC) • Combinations of ICS and FGC • National Fire Service Incident Management System Consortium

  5. FIRESCOPE • Catalyst: wildland/urban interface fires in 1970's • Adapted to structural firefighting and “all-risk” incidents • Flexible model: • Any type or size incident • Any department or agency

  6. NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM - (NIMS) • More than ICS, NIMS includes: • Command and Management • Preparedness • Resource Management / Mutual Aid • Communications and Information Management • Supporting Technologies • Ongoing Management and Maintenance • The ICS established in the NIMS is based on the Incident Command System Operational System Description document (ICS 120-1) developed by FIRESCOPE. • Many other agencies besides fire agencies – both public and private – will be adopting the DHS NIMS.

  7. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NIMS and FIRESCOPE ICS • The Information Officer position is called the Public Information Officer (PIO). • The intelligence and information function may be organized in one of the following ways: • Officer within the Command Staff. • Unit within the Planning Section. • Branch within the Operations Section. • Separate General Staff section.

  8. COMMAND SAFETY LIAISON PUBLIC INFORMATION FINANCE/ ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS PLANNING LOGISTICS ICS Command and General Staff Positions

  9. Information and Intelligence Options

  10. Need for ICS • In your department: • Safer, better handling of incidents • Professional approach • More effective use of resources

  11. Expanded Incidents • Simple ICS organization at routine incidents • Expanding incident cues ICS transition • ICS organization expands with needs • Modular design • Delegation of command responsibility

  12. ICS Command and General Staff Positions

  13. Command • Determines strategies • Selects tactics • Sets the Incident Action Plan (IAP) • Develops the ICS organization • Manages/coordinates resources • Provides for safety • Releases information • Coordinates resource activities

  14. Unified Command A unified team effort that allows all agencies with responsibility for the incident, either geographical or functional, to manage the incident by establishing a common set of incident objectives and strategies without losing or abdicating agency authority, responsibility, or accountability.

  15. Unified Command • Cues: multiple agencies/jurisdictions • Selection of participants: • Legal responsibilities • Location of incident • Type of incident • Previous training and experience • All participants contribute to the command process

  16. Command Staff • Scene Safety • Authority to take action • Interface with agencies • Liaison area • Information and media • Information area

  17. ICS General Staff Positions COMMAND SAFETY LIAISON PUBLIC INFORMATION FINANCE/ ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS PLANNING LOGISTICS

  18. Operations • Manages all resources directly engaged in incident operations • Determines and directs tactical operations • Allocates and assigns resources • Assists in developing the action plan

  19. Operations (continued) • When to staff: • Complex incidents (20+ units) • IC must focus on “big picture” • When Operations is staffed: • IC does strategies • Ops does tactics

  20. Planning • Collects and evaluates information • Records resource status • Documents the incident • Assists in developing the action plan

  21. Planning (continued) • When to staff: • When the IC needs assistance at the Command Post • On complex incidents where analysis and strategic planning are too time-consuming

  22. Logistics • Provides facilities, services, and materials to support incident operations • Assists in developing the action plan

  23. Logistics (continued) • When to staff: • When service and support functions are required to maintain operational forces • On complex, resource-intensive incidents • On incidents that will extend for a long time

  24. Finance/Administration • Responsible for all financial and legal aspects of the incident • When to staff: • Abnormal costs are encountered • Reimbursement is possible

  25. Delegating Responsibilities The IC: • Is responsible for any functions not delegated • Has ultimate responsibility to ensure all incident requirements are met

  26. The Operations Section A CLOSER LOOK

  27. COMMAND COMMAND OPERATIONS RIC RIC ENGINE 2 CREW CREW ENGINE 2 Single Resources and Crews • Single resource: individual company • Crew: personnel without apparatus

  28. COMMAND COMMAND OPERATIONS RIC RIC STRIKE TEAM TASK FORCE STRIKE TEAM TASK FORCE Task Force/Strike Team • Task force: group of single resources • Strike teams: same-type resources

  29. Task Force Example

  30. Strike Team Example

  31. Fire involves 25% of the front of the store First alarm 2 engines 1 truck 1 chief Grocery Store Example

  32. Grocery Store Example (continued) • The complex ICS you have heard about • How many alarms handled by this size organization?

  33. Resources ready for immediate assignment temporarily located Personnel in POVs should report for formation into crews Staging

  34. Level 1 Staging • Used to control first-alarm units • One or two units and chiefs go directly to scene • All other first-alarm units stop one block from scene • Report (“identity, location, direction”) • Wait for an assignment!

  35. Level 2 Staging • Formal staging area determined by IC when second alarm or mutual aid requested • Request is cue to staff the staging area Manager function • Announce staging area location on radio • Staging versus base

  36. Grocery Store Example (continued) • IC requests additional resources • Second alarm: • 3 engines (E-3, E-4, E-5) • 1 truck (T-2) How will they be distributed?

  37. Grocery Store Example (continued) All to Staging (E-3, E-4, E-5, T-2) Some to assignments Others to Staging

  38. Grocery Store Example (continued) • Assume seven units at the scene • What’s wrong with this organization?

  39. Divisions • Organize resources by geographic area • Require departments to establish a method of dividing the incident scene

  40. Dividing the Incident • ABCD System Division C Structure Division B Division D Division A

  41. Dividing the Incident (continued) • Exposure System Exposure C Division C Structure Exposure B Division B Division D Exposure D Division A

  42. Dividing the Incident (continued) Each floor is a division. Division 5 Division 4 Division 3 Division 2 Division 1

  43. Groups COMMAND Division 1 Vent Group • Organize resources by functional area of responsibility • Work across division lines • Operate at the same command level • Coordinate with Division Supervisor

  44. Start at the division and group level • Plug in resources as they arrive Grocery Store Example

  45. Garden Apartment Example

  46. Activity 1.1: Application of the Basic ICS Functions

  47. Scenario 1

  48. Scenario 2

  49. The Operations Section (continued) • Staffing the operations function • Span of control exceeded • Other concerns

  50. Garden Apartment Example