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The Habitant Diet & Self-Sufficiency

The Habitant Diet & Self-Sufficiency

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The Habitant Diet & Self-Sufficiency

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  1. The Habitant Diet & Self-Sufficiency

  2. Food • Diet was fairly plain and simple; • More concerned about food that gave energy, rather than nutrition, cost, or variety; • Most important part was bread; • Ate almost two loaves a day; • Butter, cheese, eggs, fish, and red meat.

  3. Meal Times • Usually ate four meals a day; • Lunch and afternoon snack meals were carried out to the field; • Main meal at eight o’clock; • On festive occasions, the families ate more sumptuous meals.

  4. 500 g dried green peas 1 large onion, chopped 1 carrot, grated 500-1000 g salt pork 1 bay leaf Sea salt 4 L water 1. Wash peas. 2. Soak overnight. 3. Add water. 4. Mix in onion and salt pork. 5. Bring to a boil. 6. Simmer for 2-3 hours until peas tender. 7. Remove pork after 1-2 hours. 8. Crush peas. 9. Add salt to taste. Habitant Pea Soup

  5. Self-Sufficiency on the Farm • The habitant was very much on his or her own; • No corner store, or repair person, sometimes no government; • Provided for themselves in a harsh environment.

  6. Clothing • Women and girls in the family made most of the clothing; • Clothes had to be practical and durable; • If fortunate, they had two sets of clothing; • One set for everyday, and one set for special occasions.

  7. Household Items • Women also crafted items such as rugs, curtains, blankets, and towels; • Additional items such as candles, soap, and paint; • Habitants made tables, chairs, desks, and beds out of pine, oak, or maple.

  8. Recreation • At first they had little leisure time; • Seigneurial System produced farms located close together; • Events that brought people together were: barn raisings, harvesting, flax beating, weddings, and making maple syrup; • May Day – coming of spring.

  9. Conclusion • The habitants invented simple games; • Some were lucky enough to have books; • Checkers and card games also became popular; • Singing and dancing was another past time, although the church frowned on it; • As a family became more self-sufficient, they had more time for leisure activities.

  10. Questions… • Questions?