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Intensive Positive Behavior Support -- Secondary and Tertiary Behavioral Interventions PowerPoint Presentation
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Intensive Positive Behavior Support -- Secondary and Tertiary Behavioral Interventions

Intensive Positive Behavior Support -- Secondary and Tertiary Behavioral Interventions

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Intensive Positive Behavior Support -- Secondary and Tertiary Behavioral Interventions

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  1. Intensive Positive Behavior Support -- Secondary and Tertiary Behavioral Interventions Bruce Stiller, Ph.D.; Celeste Rossetto Dickey, M.Ed.

  2. Agenda • Foundations of IPBS • Key Role of Administrator in IPBS • Key Differences between the IPBS and SST approach • Targeted Interventions (CICO; ABC) • Results from Years One and Two in IPBS Schools • Q & A

  3. IPBS: The Big Ideas • Do the easy stuff first (efficiency is a major goal) • Processes are as important as practices • Teaming is critical • Administrative support is critical

  4. Key Features of IPBS • Systematic Screening (ODR Data; Requests for Assistance; OAKS Data; Attendance) • Rapid Access to Intervention • Use of Evidence Based Practices • Use of Data to Continuously Monitor Outcomes

  5. SST v. IPBS • Test/Label/Place v. Evaluate/Problem Solve Intervene • Focus on Special Education v. services for all students (including SPED students) • Primary focus on behavior problems, but often academic intervention is the appropriate course of action • Teacher Input: Occurs at Student Centered Team meetings; not at the IPBS meeting. IPBS meetings serve a coordinating and monitoring function

  6. Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Elements of IPBS OUTCOMES Not new…its based on long history of behavioral practices & effective instructional design & strategies Not limited to any particular group of students…it’s for all students Not specific practice or curriculum…it’s a general approach to preventing problem behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  7. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~15% ~80% of Students

  8. Adapted from Sugai, 2009

  9. Adapted from Sugai, 2009

  10. IPBS Within 4J and Bethel • How students are referred and tracked • Logistics of team meetings and function • Support from administration • Training plan • Evaluation of IPBS

  11. Teams in Your School • IPBS team • Roles • Tracking • Monitoring • Process for team meetings • Student-centered team • Behavior specialist (at least two people) • Responsibilities of team • Process for team meeting

  12. Administrative Support • Attend meetings • Visible support for decision-making process of teams • Resources allocated for training, meeting times

  13. District Support • Attend meetings • Training provided on regular basis • Coaching on an ongoing basis • Technical Assistance • Link to District Leadership if additional resources are needed

  14. Practices • Secondary Prevention: Targeted Interventions applied similarly to students with similar needs • CICO • Social Skills; Anger Management; or Friendship Groups • “ABC” Intervention (Transformers; Academic Seminar) • Tertiary Prevention • Functional Behavior Assessment and Individualized Behavior Support Planning

  15. Why Do People Behave? Modeling? Accident?Instinct? Condition?? Why Do People Continue Behaving? IT WORKS!

  16. Maintaining Consequences • By far, the most common functions of problem behavior in schools are to: • Obtain Adult Attention • Obtain Peer Attention • Avoid/Escape/Delay an Aversive Academic Task

  17. Effective Student Centered Teams • Knowledge about the individual student • His/her behavior, interests, strengths, challenges, future • Knowledge about the context • Instructional goals, curriculum, social contingencies, schedule, physical setting. • Knowledge about behavioral technology • Elements of behavior • Principles of behavior • Intervention strategies Leah

  18. Common Reasons for Failure of Interventions • Interventions are not implemented with sufficient fidelity • There is insufficient follow through to determine if the intervention implemented is appropriately matched to the function of the problem behavior • Poor Contextual Fit

  19. Data • CICO Point Cards • ODR Data • Teacher Feedback Forms • Grades; Assignment Completion Data • Fidelity of Implementation Data • Consumer Satisfaction Data

  20. Data Example -- One Elementary School