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Grant Proposal Writing Workshop

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Grant Proposal Writing Workshop

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  1. Grant Proposal WritingWorkshop presented by Frederic Murray M.L.I.S. SWOSU Libraries http://faculty.swosu.edu/frederic.murray/Tribal.htm Based on an Amigos Library Services, Inc. presentation.

  2. Workshop Objectives • Understand the elements of a proposal • Understand the grant review process • Identify alternative sources of funding • Understand how Grants.gov works

  3. You Have a Great Idea…Now What? • Be sure the project is a priority for your institution and fits the funders’ criteria • Be sure your institution fits the funders’ criteria • Obtain management/council support • Allow 12 months from idea to funding

  4. Gathering Background Information • The nature of the project & how it will be conducted • Staffing & volunteer needs, including deployment of existing staff & new hires • The timetable for the project • Anticipated outcomes & assessment strategies

  5. Writing a Grant Proposal

  6. The Grant Proposal Process • Develop plan of work; identify partners • Obtain management support • Locate potential funders • Shop the proposal:get comments • Submit the proposal

  7. Writing the Proposal • Keep it simple • Request letters of support early • Proofread • Follow the application instructions • Submit the proper number of copies • A good proposal doesn’t guarantee a grant • Use a checklist • 7-12 pages

  8. Elements of a Grant Proposal • Cover Letter • Executive Summary • About Your Institution • Statement of Need • Project Description • Budget • Appendices The Narrative

  9. Cover Letter • Should make the reader want to read the proposal • Reference a past contact • Reference the grant for which you are applying • Enclosed is… • Who signs it? • 1 page

  10. Executive Summary • Captures the reader’s attention • Shows what can be done with the funder’s money • Marry your project to the needs of the funder • Mirror language that Funders use • Consider this to be a 3 minute elevator sales pitch • Usually 1-2 pages

  11. Executive Summary • ProblemA brief statement of the problem or need your agency has recognized and is prepared to address (one or two paragraphs). • SolutionA short description of the project, including what will take place and how many people will benefit from the program, how and where it will operate, for how long, and who will staff it (one or two paragraphs). • Funding requirementsAn explanation of the amount of grant money required for the project and what your plans are for funding it in the future (one paragraph). • Organization and its expertiseA brief statement of the history, purpose, and activities of your agency, emphasizing its capacity to carry out this proposal (one paragraph).

  12. Statement of Need • Educates the reader • Include Statistics and Examples • The nature of the problem (provide as much hard evidence as possible) • Don’t present the problem in unsolvable terms • Avoid circular reasoning… • Discuss collaboration • Who will benefit-the Institution? User? Patron? Researchers? Community? • Why You can do it better than anyone else

  13. Statement of Need • Presenting facts & evidence • Short, concise information captures a readers attention.

  14. Project Description • Scope • Staffing • Management • Evaluation • Sustainability

  15. Project Description: Scope • Discuss what you want to accomplish • Goal vs. Objective • Goal: Broadly stated accomplishment • Objective: Specific step towards meeting a goal • Activity: Supports the objective

  16. Project Description: Scope • Goal: Our after-school program will help children read better. • Objective: Our after-school remedial education program will assist 50 children in improving their reading scores by one grade level as demonstrated by standardized reading tests administered after participating in the program for six months. • Activity: Testing/6 month period.

  17. Project Description: Staffing • Board • Staff • Consultants • Collaborators • Volunteers

  18. Project Description: Management • Define activities planned to meet objectives • Who is responsible for oversight • Make sure activities match those listed in the budget • Plan of work • Timeline

  19. Project Description: Evaluation • Evaluation should be built into the project • External evaluator • Results • Quantitative • Counted • Qualitative • Surveys • Questionnaires • Observations

  20. Recall : Gathering Background Information • The nature of the project & how it will be conducted • Staffing & volunteer needs, including deployment of existing staff & new hires • The timetable for the project • Anticipated outcomes & assessment strategies

  21. Project Description: Sustainability • How will the project continue? • How will the organization continue? • Develop a plan for post-granting funding • Long-term funding strategies • Development Officer • Capital Campaign • Additional funding resources • Continued revenue stream from funded project

  22. Budget • Go back through the proposal narrative & make a list of all personnel & other items related to the operation of the project • Requested information usually includes: • Expense information • Income information • Budget narrative-the rationale for the numbers • The budget is often read first

  23. Worksheet Example

  24. Appendices • Bibliographical or statistical information • What materials best support your case? • What materials are requested by the funder? • Organizational Chart • Financial information • Resumes/cv’s (2 pgs) • List of Board members

  25. The Grant Review Process

  26. An Overview of the Grant Review Process • The process • Criteria for evaluating the proposal • After you get the grant • What to do if you don’t get the grant

  27. Standard Criteria for Evaluating the Proposal • Clarity: logical and easy to follow • Complete: includes all required items • Internal consistency: parts consistent with each other • External consistency: recognize accepted ideas of the field • Understanding of the problem and service methods

  28. Standard Criteria for Evaluating the Proposal (2) • Capability: to carry out promised activities • Responsiveness: to requirements, purposes, needs • Efficiency and accountability: timetable • Realism: in scope and budget • Need shown • Ability to continue project: self-sustaining

  29. After You Get the Grant • Thank you letter • Review the budget • Report at least annually even if it isn’t required • Publicity • Seek a renewal

  30. What to do if you don’t get the grant… • Don’t take it personally • Be sure you understand why • Find out if you can resubmit later

  31. Types of Funders Government & Foundations

  32. Government Funders • Government or tax funds support a particular program • Are subject to legislative oversight • Rules & Regulations • Standard guidelines • Lots of forms • Are the largest grantors

  33. Foundations • Foundations • General purpose: Ford, Mellon, Rockefeller • Special-purpose: single purpose determined by establisher • Company-sponsored: within for-profit company • Public charities: local operations • Community: apply only in their city/region • Family: usually administered by family attorney

  34. Limits on Foundation Support • Type of program funded • Geographical area • Minimum/maximum funding • Type of organization that can receive grant (now usually incorporated non-profit organizations)

  35. Important to remember for all Funders • Money is getting tighter and resources are becoming more limited • More people are applying for funding • Funders are having to become more critical in the review and assessments of proposals

  36. Locating Funding Resources • See Website • Build your own funding information file • Narrow by: • Policy • Giving Record • Location

  37. Network with Others • Take advantage of opportunities to meet with program officers • Contact funding agencies directly • If appropriate! • Talk to others who have applied for grants

  38. Managing your Grant

  39. Managing your Project • Meet reporting requirements timely • Time recording • Monitor accomplishments • Mention funder in publicity and publications • Report staff changes and budget changes • Digital Tools

  40. Reporting Requirements • Obtain guidelines from the funder • Foundation requirements • Short report and revised budget with actual expenditures • Federal requirements • Annual financial reports • Interim and final financial and narrative reports • Copies of documents generated through grant funding

  41. If You Don’t Report • Funds put on hold • Audit! (can happen to the Best of Us) • Decreased chances of future grants

  42. The Bright Side of Reporting • Activity reports for management and boards • Statistics for annual and other reports • Opportunities for publicity

  43. Seeking Continued Funding

  44. Seeking Continued Funding • Will current funder support? (or one time only) • Start planning the day you get first grant • Start writing 6-12 months before deadline • Pre-review subsequent grant

  45. Grants.gov

  46. Grants.gov • Required by all federal funding agencies • Institutions must register • Individuals must register • Strict guidelines for submission

  47. Institutions must register • Need DUNs number (Data Universal Number System) • Register with the Central Contractor Registry (CCR). • Create a User name & password with ORC, the Grants.gov credential service provider • Register with Grants.gov using the ORC name & password

  48. Individuals must register • Grants.gov will send an email to your designated POC (Point of Contact) • POC responds to email to designate individual to be Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) • AOR receives notification of AOR status and can begin grant submission

  49. Grants.gov Registration Checklist • I have my organization’s DUNS Number. • My organization is registered with CCR • I know my E-Business POC. • I have registered with ORC, the Grants.gov Credential Service Provider (CSP). • I have used my Username and Password to register with Grants.gov. • I have obtained authorization from my organization's E-Business POC. • I have secure access to Grants.gov and I’m ready to begin.

  50. Strict Guidelines for submission • Organization of grant • Format of files • Grants.gov Application Tutorial