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CHAPTER 8 PowerPoint Presentation

CHAPTER 8

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CHAPTER 8

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  1. CHAPTER 8 • Molecular Structure & Covalent Bonding Theories

  2. Chapter Goals • A Preview of the Chapter • Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory • Polar Molecules:The Influence of Molecular Geometry • Valence Bond (VB) Theory

  3. Chapter Goals Molecular Shapes and Bonding • Linear Electronic Geometry: AB2 Species • Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species • Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB4 Species • Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB3USpecies • Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB2U2 Species • Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry – ABU3 Species • Trigonal Bipyramidal Geometry • Octahedral Geometry • Compounds Containing Double Bonds • Compounds Containing Triple Bonds • A Summary of Electronic and Molecular Geometries

  4. Stereochemistry • Stereochemistry is the study of the three dimensional shapes of molecules. • Some questions to examine in this chapter are: • Why are we interested in shapes? • What role does molecular shape play in life? • How do we determine molecular shapes? • How do we predict molecular shapes?

  5. Molecular Shapes • The shape of a molecule plays an important role in its reactivity. • By noting the number of bonding and nonbonding electron pairs we can easily predict the shape of the molecule.

  6. Two Simple Theories of Covalent Bonding • Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion Theory • Commonly designated as VSEPR • Principal originator • R. J. Gillespie in the 1950’s • Valence BondTheory • Involves the use of hybridized atomic orbitals • Principal originator • L. Pauling in the 1930’s & 40’s

  7. VSEPR Theory • In order to attain maximum stability, each atom in a molecule or ion arranges the electron pairs in its valence shell in such a way to minimize the repulsion of their regions of high electron density: • Lone (unshared or nonbonding) pairs of electrons • Single bond • Double bond • Triple bond

  8. VSEPR Theory • These four types of regions of high electron density (where the electron are) want to be as far apart as possible. The electrons repel each other. • There are five basic molecular shapes based on the number of regions of high electron density around the central atom.

  9. VSEPR Theory These are the regions of high electron density around the central atom for two through six electron densities around a central atom.

  10. : : H H H Electron-Density Geometries • All one must do is count the number of electron density in the Lewis structure. • The geometry will be that which corresponds to that number of electron density. Tetrahedral

  11. VSEPR Theory • Electronic geometryis determined by the locations of regions of high electron density around the central atom(s). • Molecular geometrydetermined by the arrangement of atoms around the central atom(s). Electron pairs are not used in the molecular geometry determination just the positions of the atoms in the molecule are used.

  12. Molecular Geometries electron-density Geometry - tetrahedral • The electron-density geometry is often not the shape of the molecule, however. • The molecular geometry is that defined by the positions of only the atoms in the molecules, not the nonbonding pairs.

  13. VSEPR Theory • An example of a molecule that has the same electronic and molecular geometries is methane - CH4. • Electronic and molecular geometries are tetrahedral.

  14. VSEPR Theory • An example of a molecule that has different electronic and molecular geometries is water - H2O. • Electronic geometry is tetrahedral. • Molecular geometry is bent or angular.

  15. VSEPR Theory • Lone pairs of electrons (unshared pairs) require more volume than shared pairs. • Consequently, there is an ordering of repulsions of electrons around central atom. • Criteria for the ordering of the repulsions:

  16. VSEPR Theory • Lone pair to lone pair is the strongest repulsion. • Lone pair to bonding pair is intermediate repulsion. • Bonding pair to bonding pair is weakest repulsion. • Mnemonic for repulsion strengths lp/lp > lp/bp > bp/bp • Lone pair to lone pair repulsion is why bond angles in water are less than 109.5o.

  17. VSEPR Theory lp/bp

  18. Multiple Bonds and Bond Angles • Double and triple bonds place greater electron density on one side of the central atom than do single bonds. • Therefore, they also affect bond angles. bp/bp repulsion

  19. Nonbonding Pairs and Bond Angle • Nonbonding pairs are physically larger than bonding pairs. • Therefore, their repulsions are greater; this tends to decrease bond angles in a molecule.

  20. Nonbonding Pairs and Bond Angle

  21. Polarity • In Chapter 7 we discussed bond dipoles. • But just because a molecule possesses polar bonds does not mean the molecule as a whole will be polar.

  22. Polar Molecules: The Influence of Molecular Geometry • Molecular geometry affects molecular polarity. • Due to the effect of the bond dipoles and how they either cancel or reinforce each other. A B A A B A linear molecule nonpolar angular molecule polar

  23. Polarity By adding the individual bond dipoles, one can determine the overall dipole moment for the molecule.

  24. Polarity

  25. Polar Molecules: The Influence of Molecular Geometry • Polar Molecules must meet two requirements: • One polar bond or one lone pair of electrons on central atom. • Neither bonds nor lone pairs can be symmetrically arranged that their polarities cancel.

  26. Polarity

  27. Valence Bond (VB) Theory • Covalent bonds are formed by the overlap of atomic orbitals. • Atomic orbitals on the central atom can mix and exchange their character with other atoms in a molecule. • Process is called hybridization. • Hybrids are common: • Pink flowers • Mules • Hybrid Orbitals have the same shapes as predicted by VSEPR.

  28. Valence Bond (VB) Theory

  29. Molecular Shapes and Bonding • In the next sections we will use the following terminology: A = central atom B = bonding pairs around central atom U = lone pairs around central atom • For example: AB3U designates that there are 3 bonding pairs and 1 lone pair around the central atom.

  30. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) • Some examples of molecules with this geometry are: BeCl2, BeBr2,BeI2, HgCl2, CdCl2 • All of these examples are linear, nonpolar molecules. • Important exceptions occur when the two substituents are not the same! BeClBr or BeIBr will be linear and polar!

  31. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Electronic Geometry

  32. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Polarity

  33. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Valence Bond Theory (Hybridization)

  34. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  35. Linear Electronic Geometry:AB2 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  36. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) • Some examples of molecules with this geometry are: BF3, BCl3 • All of these examples are trigonal planar, nonpolar molecules. • Important exceptions occur when the three substituents are not the same! BF2Cl or BCI2Br will be trigonal planar and polar!

  37. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Dot Formula Electronic Geometry

  38. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Polarity

  39. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) Valence Bond Theory (Hybridization) 3s3p Cl [Ne]

  40. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  41. Trigonal Planar Electronic Geometry: AB3 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  42. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB4 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A) • Some examples of molecules with this geometry are: CH4, CF4, CCl4, SiH4, SiF4 • All of these examples are tetrahedral, nonpolar molecules. • Important exceptions occur when the four substituents are not the same! CF3Cl or CH2CI2 will be tetrahedral and polar!

  43. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB4 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  44. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB4 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  45. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB4 Species (No Lone Pairs of Electrons on A)

  46. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB3U Species (One Lone Pair of Electrons on A) • Some examples of molecules with this geometry are: NH3, NF3, PH3, PCl3, AsH3 • These molecules are our first examples of central atoms with lone pairs of electrons. Thus, the electronic and molecular geometries are different. All three substituents are the same but molecule is polar. • NH3 and NF3 are trigonal pyramidal, polar molecules.

  47. Tetrahedral Electronic Geometry: AB3U Species (One Lone Pair of Electrons on A) Valence Bond Theory