Download
administrators training program year 2004 2005 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ADMINISTRATORS TRAINING PROGRAM YEAR 2004 - 2005 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ADMINISTRATORS TRAINING PROGRAM YEAR 2004 - 2005

ADMINISTRATORS TRAINING PROGRAM YEAR 2004 - 2005

120 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

ADMINISTRATORS TRAINING PROGRAM YEAR 2004 - 2005

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. ADMINISTRATORS TRAINING PROGRAM YEAR 2004 - 2005

  2. PA Family Literacy Program • EVEN START (Title I, Part B, Subpart 3 of Elementary and Secondary Education Act, reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act) • PA Adult and Family Literacy Education Act 143 of 1986

  3. CURRENT STATUS OF PA PROGRAM 2004-2005 • 58 Programs: 25 Even Start & 33 Act 143 (including 9 under MCOL, Philadelphia) • 64 Agencies (including 9 under MCOL, Philadelphia) • 55 Summer Reading Grants • Enrolled Participants (Proposed): 3,152 Families, 3,319 Adults & 4,376 Children (7,695 Individuals) • # of School Districts: >220 • # of Charter Schools: 2

  4. Roles and Functions of Administrators – A Framework for Program Improvement

  5. FUNCTIONS OF ADMINISTRATORS • Leadership and Collaboration • Standard Setting and Support • Ensure Research-Based Content through Staff Development and Technical Assistance • Modeling for Staff • Management • Monitoring Progress

  6. Function: Leadership and Collaboration • Leadership: “the ingredient of personality which causes others to follow” • Promote literacy • Develop local interest in serving most in need areas • Keep focus on the family • Facilitate partnerships • Ability to get people to work together • Submit high quality application for funding

  7. Function: Standard Setting and Support • Formalizes and communicates expectations for high quality program design (all components) • “Total Quality Begins with Education and Ends with Education” – Japanese adage • Use Program Performance Standards to guide data collection and shape continuous improvement • Determine clear, concise and measurable objectives based on Standards and local needs to determine sufficient progress • Use evaluation results for program improvement • Understand how Bureau is using standards to monitor, improve and evaluate programs

  8. Function: Ensure Research-Based Content Through Staff Development & Technical Assistance • Use research-based information about literacy for adults and children regarding assessment, curriculum & instruction • Access the variety of technical assistance opportunities • Employ high quality staff • No “Drive by Staff Development”

  9. Some Principles in Fostering Language & Literacy Development • Children need oral language development – fundamental to early reading success • Homes and preschool classrooms play important roles in receptive vocabulary • Teachers must teach with intention and reflect constantly • Adults require more decoding and phonemic awareness (like children), and direct instruction to help them read better • Role of parents is critical – need to be able to recognize teachable moments for learning • Parents must focus on using language and reading

  10. Function: Management • Use state grants to operate and sustain effective family literacy program, including use of in-kind grant funds to match expected scope of work • Submit timely, accurate & complete reports • Provide effective files management • Provide continuous improvement of performance

  11. Function: Monitoring Progress • Use multiple methods to efficiently check on quality of implementation and compliance with Standards • Involve all parties in providing feedback about areas of improvement • Provide intervention (i.e., TA) to areas with inadequate performance • “Failure to meet standards is due to poor design and poor implementation.” – Dr. Andrew Hayes, UNC at Wilmington

  12. What is Family Literacy? Family literacy services means services that: • Are provided to participants on a voluntary basis • Are of sufficient intensity, and of sufficient duration, to make sustainable changes in a family (such as eliminating or reducing dependence on income-based public assistance) • Integrate each of the following: • Interactive literacy activities between parents and children • Training for parents on being partners with their children in learning • Parent literacy training, including training that contributes to economic self-sufficiency • Appropriate instruction for children of parents receiving the parent literacy training

  13. Four Core Instructional Components The Family Literacy model integrates: EarlyChildhoodEducation AdultEducation Family Interactive Literacy Activities between parents andtheir children ParentingEducation

  14. What Entity Is Eligible to Apply for a Grant? Family LiteracyPartnership A Local Educational Agency A Non-profit Community-Based Organization, Public Agency, IHE, or Public or Private Non-profit Organization

  15. A parent or parents Eligible for services under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act; * Attending secondary school; or * Within compulsory school attendance age. AND - The child or children, from birth through age seven (or 3rd grade), of any individual described above, or - * The child or children, age eight or older, if Part A of Title I contributes or collaborates. * Even Start Only Who Is Eligible to Participate?

  16. Identification and recruitment of families most in need Screening and preparation of parents Flexible scheduling and support services High-quality, intensive instructional programs Staff qualifications Staff training Legislative Requirements: Program Elements: Part 1

  17. * Integrated, home-based instructional services Year-round services (instructional and enrichment) Coordination with other relevant programs Instructional programs based on scientifically based reading research Regular attendance and sufficient length of participation * Even Start Only Legislative Requirements: Program Elements: Part 2

  18. Reading readiness activities for preschool age children Continuity of family literacy services Services to families most in need * Independent local project evaluation for program improvement * Even Start Only Legislative Requirements: Program Elements: Part 3

  19. Adult Outcomes Achievement in reading, writing, language acquisition, problem solving, and numeracy. Receipt of high school diploma or GED. Entry into post-secondary education, job retraining or employment or career advancement. Other State indicators. Child Outcomes Improvement in ability to read on grade level or reading readiness. School attendance. Grade retention and promotion. Other State indicators. Even Start Required Performance Indicators (Standards)

  20. Required Program Elements • Support Services • Four Instr Components • Home Visits-Even Start • Summer Services • Location of Activities • Time-Line • Staffing & Admin • Training • Coord & Collaboration • Evaluation • Need • Family Literacy Experience/Results • Partners, Intensity & Duration • Program Goals and Objectives • Identification, Recruitment and Retention

  21. Design of Program & Provision of Support Services • When Unavailable from Other Sources • Child Care • Transportation • Case Management • Limited to 10% of State Act 143 Grants

  22. Collaborative Efforts • Inst of Higher Ed • Community-Based Organizations • Family Literacy • School District(s) • Intermediate Unit • Libraries • Family Center • Head Start/State Collab. Proj • Charter Schools • Child Care • Volunteer Orgs • County Assist Office

  23. FAMILY RISK INDEX (MOST IN NEED) A high-risk child lives in a family with 4 or more of the following risk factors: • Child is not living with 2 parents • Household head is a high school dropout • Family income is below poverty line • Child is living with parent(s) who is underemployed • Family is receiving welfare benefits • Child does not have health insurance

  24. Targeting Adults Most in Need • First Priority • No Job • <24 mos on TANF • 30 hours per week of Adult Services • Second Priority • Job • < 24 mos on TANF

  25. Targeting Adults Most in Need • Third Priority • Work at Least 20 hrs/week • Beyond 24 mos on TANF • Focus on Job Retention & Educ • Fourth Priority • All Other Adults

  26. 30-Hour Requirement of AE Svcs • First Priority Adults Only • 30 Hours per Week of Adult Svcs • Educational • ABE/GED/ESL • Parent Time • PACT Time • Non-Educational: • Local Partners Only • Meet CAO Requirements

  27. National Reporting System (NRS) • Federal accountability system for adult basic education • Enacted in Project Year 2000 -2001 • Established Core Outcome Measures and Secondary Outcome Measures for adult learners  adult learner goals • Adult learner goals are tracked in e-data

  28. NRS Core Outcome Measures • Educational gain – ABLE-approved standardized tests • Enter employment • Retain employment • Receive secondary diploma or GED • Placement into post-secondary education or training

  29. NRS and You – Next Steps • Understanding how to set adult learner goals and assess/track level attainment is very important • “National Reporting System (NRS) Goal Setting and Level Attainment Training Module for Practitioners” is available • Access this training by contacting your regional ABLE Professional Development Center

  30. TITLE I AND SCHOOLS: PARTNERS IN FAMILY LITERACY

  31. Title I, Even Start & PA Act 143 – NCLB Act Partners Title I Requirements: • State Plan Assurance • LEA Plan Provisions • Components of a Schoolwide Program • Schoolwide Program Plan • Components of a Targeted Assistance Program • LEA Parental Involvement Written Policy • LEA Parental Involvement Reservation • LEA Building Capacity for Parental Involvement

  32. Uses of Title I Funds for Family Literacy Any Title I school may use Title I funds to: • Operate a preschool for eligible children. • To provide after-school or summer programs for eligible school-age children. • Literacy training for parents. • Parenting education. • Interactive literacy activities.

  33. Use of Funds for Family Literacy Title I funds may be used to: • Create a new family literacy program at the district or school level. • Expand an existing family literacy program (e.g. those funded by Head Start) by adding more children, more time, or more services. • Improve the quality of existing family literacy program programs.

  34. Use of Funds for Family Literacy For example, Title I funds may be used for: • Teacher Salaries • Adult Education • Parent Involvement/Parenting Education • Professional Development • Counseling services • Minor remodeling • Leasing or renting of space • Collaboration with Head Start, Special Ed, etc.

  35. Family Literacy: A Partnership With Schools and Parents to Support Reading • Family literacy programs operate in > 220 school districts within all 67 counties. • Collaborative relationship with 25 of 35 Reading First-eligible LEAs. • Targets families most in need.

  36. Family Literacy: A Partnership With Schools and Parents to Support Reading • Serves both preschool and school-age children (and their parents) through third grade. • School-age performance of enrolled children is part of Pennsylvania Family Literacy Statewide Evaluation.

  37. Family Literacy: A Partnership With Schools and Parents to Support Reading • Family Literacy Summer Reading Program supports schools and libraries in providing intensive and continuous parent-child reading activities during summer.

  38. How Can Family Literacy Programs Increase Opportunities for Family Involvement? • Strengthen family-school partnerships through good communication, accountability and mutual responsibility for children’s learning. • Collaborate with schools as partners toward mutual goals that are recognized as primarily beneficial to families.

  39. How Can Family Literacy Programs Increase Opportunities for Family Involvement? • Include family literacy staff in school district professional development and as part of the early reading team. • Involve parents in the transition process from preschool to kindergarten.

  40. How Can Family Literacy Programs Help Schools to Improve Achievement Levels? • Provide program continuity through developmentally appropriate curricula for preschool and K-3 children. • Maintain ongoing communication and cooperation between preschool and kindergarten or first grade staff. • Prepare for transitions of children from preschool to kindergarten or first grade.

  41. How Can Family Literacy Programs Help Schools to Improve Achievement Levels? • Provide training to school staff regarding family literacy goals, objectives and Program Performance Standards. • Establish communication with teachers to share information about each child’s developmental progress and needs. • Give parents the resources, training and information they need to help children learn, and help teachers and principals to engage families.

  42. How Can Family Literacy Programs Support Teachers in Helping Children Learn to Read? • Form partnerships, through mentoring and tutoring programs, to strengthen children’s reading and writing skills beginning with the preschool years.

  43. How Can Family Literacy Programs Support Teachers in Helping Children Learn to Read? • Use research-and strengths-based instructional practices, technology, and multiple delivery systems to address parent and family needs, and to accommodate the parenting needs of a diverse population. • Focus curriculum development on encouraging parents and children to become partners in their education.

  44. FISCAL REPORTING AND REQUIREMENTS • Financial Accounting Information (FAI) System • Quarterly Cash Reconciliation Report • Audit Confirmation • Budget Revisions • Final Expenditure Report

  45. Family Literacy Accountability System – Pennsylvania State Family Literacy Consortium PA Department of Education Bureau of ABLE Act 143 Family Literacy Programs Even Start Family Literacy Programs e-data system web web paper paper Statewide Evaluation (all FL programs) ES local evaluation FL Professional Development SEQUAL (local program improvement process)

  46. Forms • Family Literacy Intake/Exit Forms For entry of information into edata • Adult Assessment And Early Childhood Assessment Forms • Parent/Child Literacy Activity Pre-test and Post-test • End of Year School Progress Report

  47. Where are the Forms? Go To: • http://www.pafamilyliteracy.org • Document Center • Data Collection Forms

  48. What to Who When? • Forms for Intake/Exit, assessment, and hours are used to enter information into the edata system and should be file after entry into the system. • Parent/Child Literacy Activity Forms are sent to ISAL in January and July • End of School Progress Reports are sent to ISAL in July

  49. Information • PA Family Literacy Listserv • To be included on the listserv send an email message to mrg8@psu.edu. The message must include your name, agency, and a correct email address. • Information on Forms or the Family Literacy Website • call Peggy Grumm at 814.863.0954

  50. Adult Outcomes Achievement in reading, writing, language acquisition, problem solving, and numeracy. Receipt of high school diploma or GED. Entry into post-secondary education, job retraining or employment or career advancement. Other State indicators. Child Outcomes Improvement in ability to read on grade level or reading readiness. School attendance. Grade retention and promotion. Other State indicators. Even Start Required Performance Indicators (Standards)