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OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
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OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012

OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012

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OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012

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  1. OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012 Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

  2. Welcome!Agenda for today’s webinar… • Overview: shift in Balance of Reading and Writing in ELA • Getting your district/building ready for CCSS implementation • Thinking about foundations and needs • Update on Smarter Balanced Assessment Initiatives • New resources and opportunities • Address questions and discuss next steps CCSS Webinar Series Part 4: ELA

  3. Before we begin…About You We’d like to know a little about who is out there. Time for a poll. CCSS Webinar Series Part 4:ELA

  4. 2011-12 CCSS Timeline and Foci… OSPI Quarterly Webinar Series August/Sept. 2011 January 2012 March and May 2012 CCSS Webinar Series Part 4:

  5. Implementing the Common Core State Standards in Washington State Our Core Values: This vision can only occur through core values of clarity, consistency, collaboration, coordination, and commitment from classrooms, schools, and communities to the state level. Our Vision: Every student will have access to the CCSS standards through high quality instruction aligned with the standards every day; and that all English language arts and mathematics teachers are prepared and receive the support they need to implement the standards in their classrooms every day. Our Purpose: To develop a statewide system with aligned resources that supports all school districts in their preparation of educators and students to implement the CCSS. This includes building system-wide capacity for sustained professional learning that can support CCSS implementation now and be applied to other initiatives in the future.

  6. Washington Implementation Partnerships PLUS… Large School Districts Higher Education Statewide Education and Content Associations

  7. Transition to the ELA CCSS in Washington Three-year transition plan focuses on shift areas each year, with an increasing level of rigor as we progress. OSPI will provide the “big picture” support and resources, while ESD partners will provide “deeper dives” Resources, references, and supports will be available to all districts, schools, teachers, and communities

  8. A shift in balance: literary and informational reading and writing OSPI CCSS ELA Webinar Series, Part 4, May 31, 2012 Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

  9. CCSS English Language Arts

  10. English Language Arts Common Core Standards for Washington: Map of Skills and Concepts

  11. Literacy development is a shared responsibility within a school Talk with your team: what are your current successes and challenges about sharing the responsibility of literacy instruction?

  12. ELA / Literacy: Major Shifts Balance of Literary and Informational Texts Increased Complexity of Text Writing Using Evidence Text-based Questions and Answers Academic Vocabulary Literacy in the Content Areas

  13. Why more informational text? Provides an ideal context for building language, vocabulary, knowledge, and reasoning Is challenging, complex, and has deep comprehension-building potential Is an opportunity for students to learn how to engage, interact, and have “conversations” with the text in ways that prepare them for the type of experiences they will encounter in college and careers.

  14. Balance of Literary and Informational Texts Literature includes • Stories • Drama • Poetry Informational Text includes • Personal essays • Literary nonfiction • Speeches • Opinion pieces • Biographies • Memoirs Sue Pimental talks about the balance of textshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7yQk6a501s&feature=player_detailpage

  15. Informational text in CCSS: Comprehensive Literacy • In Reading standards (RI 1 – 10, RH 1– 10, RST 1– 10) • In Writing standards • Students conduct research, draw evidence to support arguments and analyses, compare texts, etc. • In Speaking and Listening standards • Students prepare for conversations and collaborations, present findings and supporting evidence, etc. • In Language standards • Students acquire academic and domain-specific vocabulary, use context to determine meaning, etc.

  16. Balance of Writing Text Types • In grades K-5, the term opinion refers to persuasive writing • Argumentative is a form of persuasion but brings in evidence from both sides of the issue. • Narrative strategies are important component to developing both argumentative and explanatory writing

  17. What the balance looks like K-5 • Literary nonfiction and historical, scientific, and technical texts. Includes • Biographies and autobiographies; • Books about history, social studies, science, and the arts; • Technical texts, including directions, forms, and information displayed in graphs, charts, or maps; and • Digital sources on a range of topics • Emphasis is on text structure other than narrative • Cause and effect; chronological/sequential • Compare/contrast; enumeration and description • Opinion and supporting arguments

  18. Balance 6-12

  19. A balance of informational text 6-12 http://youtu.be/1zHWMfg_8r0 Dave Coleman talks cross-content

  20. What the balance looks like 6-12 After determining the figurative and connotative meanings of words, students need to consider the significant influence of the author’s word choice as a whole on the text’s tone or overall understanding. Students are asked to consider how an author crafts the structure of a text to produce a particular effect.

  21. So… what happens in the classroom?

  22. What this looks like in reading K-12: With assistance, students should: …understand how a piece of informational text is structured. …ask and answer questions about words they do not know; … identify the main print concepts/features of a book, and …understand the roles of both author and illustrator. … understand how illustrations help explain the text, … discuss similarities and differences in two texts that share the same main idea. … develop the ability to recognize the author’s reasoning by finding support within the text.

  23. What this looks like in writing K-12: Blended literacy skills in the high school classroom…. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ym-VHwbpAQM Students should: Compose arguments and opinions, informative/explanatory pieces, and narrative texts Focus on the use of reason and evidence to substantiate an argument or claim Conduct research – short projects and sustained inquiry Incorporate technology

  24. K-12 classroom snapshot: You would see Students using note-taking organizers, question charts, prompt sheets, etc. Teachers explicitly teaching discipline-specific as well as generic comprehension strategies. Teachers collaboratively planning and preparing text and materials. Task-based accountability built into every lesson task. – from K-12 Teachers: Building Comprehension in the Common Core

  25. Sample: Interactive Notebook

  26. K-12 classroom snapshot: You would hear Middle school example http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SC4OG11zOC8 8:54 to 9:37 • Teachers modeling generic as well as discipline-specific comprehension strategies. • Teachers modeling reasoning by thinking out loud. • Students expressing opinions with explained positions and reasoning. • Students using knowledge of text structure and genres to predict main and subordinate ideas. • Students and teachers summarizing a discussion when it closes. – from K-12 Teachers: Building Comprehension in the Common Core

  27. What should we consider? Approximately what percentage of instructional time and materials will be devoted to literary nonfiction in your grade(s)? What collaborative structures are already in place to support the sharing of this “balance” across a student’s day and year? What is one strategy, approach, or classroom context that supports learning to read informational text?

  28. Statewide Assessment Landscape and Update New Assessment System for CCSS: What we know so far

  29. A National Consortium of States • 28 states representing 44% of K-12 students • 21 governing, 7 advisory states • Washington state is fiscal agent

  30. A Balanced Assessment System:ELA and Math --Grades 3-8 and High School Summative assessments Benchmarked to college and career readiness Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness All students leave high school college and career ready Teacher resources for formative assessment practices to improve instruction Interim assessments Flexible, open, used for actionable feedback CCSS Webinar Series Part 4

  31. A Balanced Assessment System

  32. Time and format • Summative: - Administration window is last 12 weeks of school - For each content area - ELA & Math • Shorter option for states (~3 hours ELA, ~2 hours Math) • Scale score on comprehensive test (met/not met determination) • Longer option for states (~5 hours ELA, ~3 hours Math) • Able to report data on claims for individual students

  33. Time and format • Interim assessments • Can be used as often as needed • Can be customized by districts/schools • To focus on selected strands • To clone summative test • Will use Computer Adaptive Technology • Released items from summative item bank

  34. Washington’s Testing System Transition Current Testing System • Reading and Math: Grades 3–8 and 10 • Writing: Grades 4, 7, 10 • Science: Grades 5, 8, 10 SBAC/CCSS Testing System (fully operational in 2014-15) • English/Language Arts and Math: Grade 3–8 and 11* • Science exams are required under ESEA but are not included in SBAC *11th grade to measure college and career readiness. We are working with higher ed to explore the possible use of these measures as an alternative for college placement (or entrance). () CCSS Webinar Series Part 4

  35. Washington’s Testing System Transition Current Testing System • Reading and Math: Grades 3–8 and 10 • Writing: Grades 4, 7, 10 • Science: Grades 5, 8, 10 SBAC/CCSS Testing System (fully operational in 2014-15) • English/Language Arts and Math: Grade 3–8 and 11* • Science exams are required under ESEA but are not included in SBAC *11th grade to measure college and career readiness. We are working with higher ed to explore the possible use of these measures as an alternative for college placement (or entrance). ()

  36. Still to be worked out: Washington’s Policy Discussion… CCSS Webinar Series Part 4 Will 11th grade exam be used for graduation (exit exam) in Washington? If these exams are our exit exams what will the CAA options be? Will the Summative SBAC test replace our End of Course exams or will SBAC have End of Course exams too? How will Washington’s science tests mesh with these tests?

  37. Find Out More: www.SmarterBalanced.org State Contact: Robin.Munson@k12.wa.us CCSS Webinar Series Part 4

  38. http://www.smarterbalanced.org/smarter-balanced-assessments/ Zip files with ELA and Math Item Specifications and Sample Student Tasks CCSS Webinar Series Part 4

  39. Resources Opportunities and Ways to keep in touch

  40. Spring and Summer 2012 CCSS Opportunities to Build Statewide… CCSS Webinar Series Part 4: District and Building Leaders Awareness:

  41. http://www.k12.wa.us/CoreStandards/ProfDev.aspx CCSS Webinar Series Part 4: District and Building Leaders

  42. Washington State Literacy Leadership Cadre

  43. Have a great summer! • Common Core Questions: • Email: corestandards@k12.wa.usOR • Greta Bornemann, OSPI CCSS Project Lead, E-mail: Greta.Bornemann@k12.wa.us • ELA CCSS Questions • Liisa Moilanen, ELA Director • Liisa.MoilanenPotts@k12.wa.us CCSS Webinar Series Part 4: District and Building Leaders