The Texas Comprehensive Center Annual Forum Making Sense Of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Texas Comprehensive Center Annual Forum Making Sense Of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

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  1. The Texas Comprehensive Center Annual Forum Making Sense Of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) San Antonio, Texas Paul Ruiz, PhD: Principal Partner The Education Trust, SW July 30, 2006 pruiz@edtrust.org

  2. Concept Behind AYP: • Establish clear goals for student learning. • Measure whether students are reaching them. • Hold educators accountable for raising student achievement. • Commit to making improvements in schools that aren’t raising student achievement.

  3. AYP is a signaling device • It indicates whether schools, districts, and states are on-target with all groups of students. • If not, AYP identifies which schools and groups of students need the most help.

  4. Steps are taken to help students in schools that do not make AYP. (i.e., the hard work is just beginning)

  5. AYP is NOT a reform strategy Anyone who asserts that AYP alone will raise achievement or close gaps is over-selling NCLB but . . . Anyone who’s ready to say today that we can’t meet these goals is under-estimating our kids and our schools.

  6. Why do we need AYP?

  7. Prior to NCLB, states were not serious enough about accountability. Most states only held schools accountable for overall performance.

  8. Howard Bishop Middle SchoolGainesville, Florida • 55% African American • 58% Low Income • An “A” school under the Florida accountability system • Did not make AYP for 2003-04 Source: Florida Department of Education, http://www.fldoe.org

  9. Achievement Gaps at Howard Bishop2004 Reading Composite AYP Target = 31% Source: Florida Department of Education, http://www.fldoe.org

  10. B.C. Charles ElementaryNewport News, Virginia • 39% African American • 35% Low Income • Fully Accredited under the Virginia accountability system • Did not make AYP for 2002-03 Source: Virginia Department of Education, http://www.pen.k12.va.us School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org

  11. Achievement Gaps at B.C. Charles2003 Reading/Language Arts Composite AYP Target = 61% Source: Virginia Department of Education, http://www.pen.k12.va.us

  12. . . . And states’ growth targets allowed achievement gaps to get bigger.

  13. Farallone View ElementaryCabrillo Unified, California • 25% Latino • 22% Low Income • A successful school under the California accountability system (API) • Did not make AYP for 2002-03 Source: California Department of Education, http://www.cde.ca.gov School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org

  14. Achievement Gaps at Farallone View2003 Math Composite AYP Target = 16% Source: School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org

  15. Gaps Grew From 2002 to 2003Grade 4 English Language Arts 38 53 Source: School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org

  16. Gaps Grew From 2002 to 2003Grade 4 Math 41 34 Source: School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org

  17. Under AYP, a school is not successful unless it is successfully teaching all groups of students.

  18. The public supports this definition of success How concerned would you be about (the schools in your area/your child’s school) under the following circumstances? Most of the students in the school are meeting state standards but African American and Hispanic students are not. Concerned Voters: 88% Parents: 93% Source: Business Roundtable Survey conducted by SDS (June 2003).

  19. The public supports this definition of success Is it “OK” or “Not OK” to consider a school to be making adequate progress if only special education students are not meeting state standards? Not OK Source: Business Roundtable Survey conducted by SDS (June 2003).

  20. The public supports this definition of success Is it “OK” or “Not OK” to consider a school to be making adequate progress if only limited English proficient students are not meeting state standards? Not OK Source: Business Roundtable Survey conducted by SDS (June 2003).

  21. More than 100 African American and Latino superintendents, the Council of the Great City Schools, and other education leaders have spoken up in support of NCLB’s accountability provisions.

  22. 33 of 47 Chief State School Officers believe that NCLB will improve student learning To what extent do you believe that, over time, the NCLB accountability requirements will result in increased student achievement? Source: Center on Education Policy, January 2004

  23. Across the country, schools are rising to the challenge of educating all students to high standards.

  24. Centennial Place Elementary SchoolAtlanta Public Schools • 91% African American • 79% Low Income • In 2002, performed in the top 7% of Georgia schools in 4th grade reading • In 2002, performed in the top 12% of Georgia schools in 4th grade math • Made AYP for 2003-04 Source: Georgia Department of Education, http://www.doe.k12.ga.us Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org

  25. High Achievement at Centennial Place2004 Reading Composite AYP Target = 60% Source: Georgia Department of Education, http://www.doe.k12.ga.us

  26. T. Ryland Sanford ElementaryNewport News, Virginia • 54% African American • 55% Low Income • In 2002, performed in the top 20% of Virginia schools in grade 5 math • Fully Accredited under the Virginia accountability system • Made AYP for 2002-03 Source: Virginia Department of Education, http://www.pen.k12.va.us School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org

  27. Closing Gaps at Sanford2003 Reading/Language Arts Composite AYP Target = 61% Source: Virginia Department of Education, http://www.pen.k12.va.us

  28. Devon Aire ElementaryMiami, Florida • 61% Latino • 27% Low Income • 15% English Language Learners • 9% Students with Disabilities • In 2002, performed in the top 5% of Florida schools in 5th grade reading and math • An “A” school under the Florida accountability system • Made AYP for 2003-04 Source: School Information Partnership, http://www.schoolresults.org Florida Department of Education, http://www.fldoe.org Dispelling the Myth, http://www.edtrust.org

  29. High Achievement at Devon Aire2004 Reading Composite AYP Target = 31% Source: Florida Department of Education, http://www.fldoe.org

  30. Some of Texas’ schools have been particularly successful in proving that all students can succeed.

  31. Hambrick Middle SchoolAldine, Texas • 72% Latino • 23% African-American • 87% Low-Income • In 2002, performed with the top 15% of all schools in 8th Grade Reading & Math • Made AYP for 2002-03 Source: Texas Education Agency, http://www.tea.state.tx.us Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org

  32. Hambrick Middle School: Raising Achievement While Narrowing GapsTAAS, 1994-2002 98% 95% 57% 35% Source: Texas Education Agency Academic Excellence Indicator System, http://www.tea.state.tx.us

  33. Ortiz ElementaryAbilene, Texas • 68% Latino • 24% White • 90% Low-Income • In 2002, performed as well or better than 100% of Texas schools in grade 4 math • In 2002, performed as well or better than 82% of Texas schools in grade 4 reading • Made AYP for 2002-03 Source: Texas Education Agency, http://www.tea.state.tx.us Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org

  34. High Achievement at Ortiz2003 TAKS Reading/Language Arts Composite AYP Target = 46.8% Source: Texas Education Agency, http://www.tea.state.tx.us

  35. High Achievement at Ortiz2003 TAKS Math Composite AYP Target = 33.4% Source: Texas Education Agency, http://www.tea.state.tx.us

  36. Gruver ElementaryFort worth, Texas • 53% Latino • 47% White • 60% Low-Income • In 2004, received the National Blue Ribbon Award from the Department of Education for its student achievement • Made AYP for 2003-04 Source:Texas Education Agency, http://www.tea.state.tx.us; Dispelling the Myth Online, http://www.edtrust.org

  37. Gruver Elementary School: Rapid ImprovementTAAS, 1994-2002 98% 0 gap 95% 57% 32 35% Source: Texas Education Agency Academic Excellence Indicator System, http://www.tea.state.tx.us

  38. Gruver Elementary School: All Students Achieving at High LevelsTAAS, 1994-2002 100% 88% 100% 75% Source: Texas Education Agency Academic Excellence Indicator System, http://www.tea.state.tx.us

  39. Safe Harbor recognizes schools that are making significant improvement, even if they haven’t met state-established AYP goals.

  40. Leschi ElementarySeattle, Washington • 79% African American • 72% Low Income • Made AYP for 2002-03 Source: Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction, http://ospi.k12.wa.us

  41. Achievement at Leschi2003 Reading Composite AYP Target = 56.2% Source: Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction, http://ospi.k12.wa.us

  42. All Students and Low Income Students Made Safe Harbor in Reading 2003 AYP Target = 56.2% Source: Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction, http://ospi.k12.wa.us

  43. All Students and Low Income Students Made Safe Harbor in Reading • 70% below proficient in 2002 • 58% below proficient in 2003 • 17% reduction in the percent of students below proficient from 2002 to 2003

  44. AYP is having positive effects on schools and systems

  45. Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North CarolinaRaising Achievement, Closing GapsGrade 3 Math 19 35 40 Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, http://www.ncpublicschools.org

  46. DelawareRaising Achievement, Closing GapsGrade 5 Reading 8 30 Source: Delaware Department of Education, http://www.doe.state.de.us

  47. MichiganRaising Achievement, Closing GapsGrade 8 Math 37 42 Source: Michigan Department of Education, http://www.michigan.gov/mde

  48. MarylandRaising Achievement, Closing GapsGrade 3 Reading 24 31 Source: Maryland Department of Education, http://www.mdreportcard.org

  49. PennsylvaniaRaising Achievement, Closing GapsGrade 8 Reading 35 43 Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education, http://www.pde.state.pa.us/

  50. New YorkRaising Achievement, Closing GapsElementary Level Math 26 36 42 Source: New York Department of Education, http://www.nysed.gov/