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Catastrophe Management for Executives: A Primer

Catastrophe Management for Executives: A Primer

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Catastrophe Management for Executives: A Primer

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  1. Catastrophe Management for Executives: A Primer

  2. “ Buffalo to Allison”Presented at:Houston Marine Insurance SeminarSeptember 25, 2001Steven P. Weiss, AMIM, NAMS-CMSRVW, Inc

  3. Incident Command and Catastrophe Management History of Incident Command ICS Organization Executive Concerns Basic Terminology Common Responsibilities National Interagency Incident Management System

  4. Incident Command System Organization

  5. ICS • Used to manage emergency and non-emergency events • Works well for both large and small situations • Very flexible

  6. ICS Applications • Fires, hazardous materials releases, oil spills, and multi-casualty incidents • Multi-jurisdictional and multi-agency disasters • Search & rescue operations • Pest eradication programs • Law enforcement incidents • Natural disasters • Planned events

  7. Buffalo 292: March 18, 1996

  8. Wortham Center June 9, 2001

  9. ICS Features • ICS Organization • Incident Facilities • Incident Action Plan • Span of Control • Common Responsibilities

  10. Executive Concern #1 • What are the implications of an incident to my organization and to myself?--Political implications--Economic implications--Social implications--Environmental Implications--Cost implications --Legal Implications • All of these will affect the development of response objectives and strategies.

  11. Management System • Helps mitigate risks by providing:--Accurate information--Strict accountability--Planning--Cost-effective operations--Logistical support --Documentation

  12. Executive Concern #2 • How do I maintain control when incidents occur?--Contingency Planning --Establish policy for incident --Provide guidelines on priorities--Objectives for IC/UC--Constraints on IC/UC

  13. Executive Concern #3 • Where do I fit in the incident management process?--As Incident Commander--As a member of the Unified Command--Providing support for IC/UC

  14. Unified Command • Used in multi-agency or multi-jurisdictional incidents • Establishes common response objectives and strategies without compromising agency authority, responsibility, or accountability.

  15. Unified Commanders • In charge at the incident • Designated by responsible jurisdictions, agencies or the Responsible Party • Assigns personnel as necessary • May have one or more deputies from same or different jurisdictions

  16. Command Staff • Information Officer prepares press releases and serves as point of contact for the media. • Safety Officer prepares Site Safety Plan and monitors safety conditions. • Liaison Officer serves as point of contact for Agency Representatives of assisting and supporting organizations. • Legal Officer provides legal advice to the Incident Commander or Unified Command. • All may have assistants as required.

  17. General Staff

  18. Operations Section Chief • Establish and manage the Operations Section • Conduct tactical assignments to accomplish incident objectives • Only ONE person assigned as Operations Section Chief--deputies assigned as required

  19. Planning Section Chief • Establish and manage the Planning Section • Collect, analyze, and display information • Maintain situation information and status of resources • Prepare Incident Action Plan (IAP) • Maintain incident documentation • Prepare Demobilization Plan • Manage Technical Specialists • Only ONE person assigned as Planning Section Chief--Deputies Assigned as required.

  20. Logistics Section Chief • Establish and manage the Logistics Section • Acquire personnel, equipment, materials, facilities, and services • Only ONE person assigned as Logistics Section Chief--deputies assigned as required

  21. Finance/Administration Section Chief • Establish and manage the Finance/Administration Section • Conduct on-site financial and administrative activities • Only ONE person assigned as Finance/Administration Section Chief--deputies assigned as required

  22. Cost Control • “Manage the event--don’t be managed by it!”

  23. Incident Action Plan • Oral or written (determined by Unified Command) • Includes measurable tactical assignments to accomplish response objectives • Lists activated organizational elements • Includes supporting plans and materials • Communicated to all supervisory personnel • Generally covers operational period of not over twenty-four hours

  24. Common Responsibilities • Receive assignment from your agency • Bring any specialized supplies or equipment • Follow check-in & demobilization procedures • Obtain briefing from supervisor upon arrival • Use clear text in radio communications • Acquire necessary work materials • Brief subordinates • Complete required forms--document activities

  25. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response I—Think BIG! Don’t underestimate the size or impact of the spill.

  26. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response II—Focus on the emergency first. Remember the priorities are people, property, the environment, then product.

  27. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response III—Get the big picture early—get site assessment ASAP.

  28. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response IV—Plan your work and work your plan.

  29. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response V—Put together the best team for the job.

  30. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response VI—Establish the required support systems for a sustained response.

  31. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response VII—Don’t loose track of your resources.

  32. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response VIII—Maintain proper documentation of the response.

  33. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response IX—Understand and work with the agencies.

  34. 10 Commandments of Emergency Response X—If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!!!