Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

understanding how to use quotations in your research paper n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper

play fullscreen
1 / 8
Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper
149 Views
Download Presentation
talon
Download Presentation

Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Understanding How to Use Quotations in Your Research Paper "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  2. When do I use quotations? Use quotations when: You want to add the power of an author’s words to support your argument. You want to disagree with an author’s argument. You would to highlight powerful phrases or passages. You are comparing and contrasting specific points of view. You want to note the important research that precedes your own. "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  3. What are the quotation options? Full quotation of sentence(s) using quotation marks. Partial quotation from the beginning of a sentence, from the middle, or from the end. Block quotation of more than four lines using block quoting format. "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  4. Full Quotation With Quotation Marks In Morning in America,Gil Troy writes, “It was more helpful to think of ‘yuppie’ as…a shorthand usefully applied to some 1980s trends and attitudes that many indulged rather than as a mold for real people” (124). "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  5. Use Signal Words and Phrases Do not leave your quotes "naked." NO: After June's humiliating piano recital, Waverly adds insult to injury. "You aren't a genius like me" (Tan 151). YES: After June's humiliating piano recital, Waverly adds insult to injury by declaring, "You aren't a genius like me" (Tan 151). "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  6. Possible Signal Words/Phrases According to (The Author) , "..." As (The Author) goes on to explain, "..." Characterized by (The Author) , the society is "..." As one critic points out, "..." (The Author) believes that "..." (The Author) claims that "..." In the words of (The Author) , "..." Other verbs: acknowledges, admits, agrees, argues, comments, compares, declares, demonstrates, disputes, emphasizes, illustrates, implies, notes, observes, points out, refutes, reports, states, suggests, "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  7. Partial Quotation With Quotation Marks While the media created the idea that yuppies were everywhere, actually “this media illusion had little grounding in demographic realities” (Troy 124). "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.

  8. What is the QUO-PAR-PUNC Rule? Quotation marks-Parentheses-Punctuation. Within the parentheses, you usually write the author's last name and the page number. NO: When Waverly accuses her mother of showing off, Lindo's eyes turn "into dangerous black slits. She ha[s] no words for [Waverly], just sharp silence. (Tan 102)" YES: When Waverly accuses her mother of showing off, Lindo's eyes turn "into dangerous black slits. She ha[s] no words for [Waverly], just sharp silence" (Tan 102). "Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing. University of Wisconsin, 11 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2012. <Http://Writing.Wisc.Edu/Handbook/Qpa_paraphrase.Html>.