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Stephanie Thau

Stephanie Thau

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Stephanie Thau

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  1. Reliability of Offspring’s Reports on Parental Smoking History in Smoking Surveys and Factors Affecting Responses Stephanie Thau

  2. Questions • How reliable is offspring’s report on parental cigarette use? • Does the reliability differ between siblings and twins? • Can we identify characteristics that impact the extent to which offspring’s reports of parental smoking match parent’s self-reports?

  3. Sample • The data comes from the NAG (Nicotine Addiction Genetics) Project, conducted by Pam Madden, Ph.D., and the IRPG Project, conducted by Andrew Heath, D.Phil. There were 2713 families, with a total of 9688 participants, ranging in age from 18-91. Of those, 5163 (53.3%) were female and 4525 (46.7%) were male. • There were 1272 participants from 597 families with either a mother or father that participated in the survey. There were 515 mothers that participated and 374 fathers. Of those with at least one parent participating with a history of regular smoking, 89% experienced that parent smoking during their lifetime.

  4. Percentages of Mom’s Reports of Their Own Smoking Compared to Offspring’s Reports of Their Mom’s Smoking Note: Offspring used was the oldest offspring in a family

  5. Percentages of Dad’s Reports of Their Own Smoking Compared to Offspring’s Reports of Their Dad’s Smoking Note: Offspring used was the oldest offspring in a family

  6. Correlation Between All Offspring’s Reports of Parental Smoking Habits (n=1732) and Parental Self Report (mom n=515, dad n=374)

  7. All Female Offspring’s Reports of Parental Smoking Habits (n=886) Compared With Parent’s Self Report (mom n=515, dad n=374)

  8. All Male Offspring’s Reports of Parental Smoking Habits (n=846) Compared With Parent’s Self Report (mom n=515, dad n=374)

  9. Reports of Parental Smoking Habits by Offspring with a History of Regular Smoking (n=1595)Compared With Mom’s Self Report (n=515)

  10. Reports of Parental Smoking Habits by Offspring with a History of Regular Smoking (n=1595)Compared With Dad’s Self Report (n=374)

  11. Reports of Parental Smoking Habits by Offspring Who Were Exposed To Smoking in the Home (n=1121) Compared With Mom’s Self Report (n=515)

  12. Reports of Parental Smoking Habits by Offspring Who Were Exposed To Smoking in the Home (n=1121)Compared With Dad’s Self Report (n=374)

  13. Do Twins Have a Stronger Correlation (# of twin pairs, n=380) Than Siblings (n=1632) in Report of Mom’s Smoking Habits?

  14. Do Twins Have a Stronger Correlation • (# of twin pairs, n=380) Than Siblings (n=1632) in Report of Dad’s Smoking Habits?

  15. Are Female Siblings (n=918) More Reliable Than Male Siblings (n=697) in Report of Mom’s Smoking Habits?

  16. Are Female Siblings (n=918) More Reliable Than Male Siblings (n=697) in Report of Dad’s Smoking Habits?

  17. Does Having a Parent With A Drinking Problem (n=520) or Who Drinks Excessively (n=576) Affect Reliability with Mom’s Responses?

  18. Does Having a Parent With A Drinking Problem (n=520) or Who Drinks Excessively (n=576) Affect Reliability With Dad’s Responses?

  19. Conclusions • For all offspring, reliability is moderate to high in all instances except for dad’s history of regular smoking. • Female offspring were less likely to correctly report their father’s self-reported smoking habits compared to male offspring. • Female and male offspring were similar in report of their mother’s smoking behaviors.

  20. Conclusions (continued) • There was not a subsequent change in reliability of responses if the offspring was a regular smoker. • There is no substantial difference in reliability if the offspring was exposed to smoking in the home. • The reliability of twin’s report of parental smoking behaviors is similar to that of other siblings.

  21. Conclusions (continued) • If offspring reported at least one parent with a drinking problem or that drank excessively, their responses concerning the parent’s smoking behavior were more highly correlated with the parent’s self-reported smoking behavior. Since alcohol problems are correlated with smoking habits, offspring might have a heightened awareness of their parent’s smoking.

  22. References • CA Boyle and EA Brann, Proxy respondents and the validity of occupational and other exposure data. Am J Epidemiol136 (1992), pp. 712–721. • EA Gilpin, JP Pierce, SW Cavinet al., Estimates of population smoking prevalence: Self vs proxy reports of smoking status. Am J Public Health84 (1994), pp. 1576–1579 • T. Barnett, J. O'Loughlin, G. Paradis and L. Renaud, Reliability of proxy reports of parental smoking by elementary schoolchildren, Ann Epidemiol7 (1997), pp. 396–399. • Laniado-Laborin R, Candelaria JI, Villaseñor A, Woodruff SI, Sallis JF. Concordance between parental and children’s reports of parental smoking prompts. Chest 2004;125:429-434. • Patrick DL, Cheadle A, Thompson DC, et al. The validity of self-reported smoking: a review and meta-analysis. Am J Public Health 1994; 84:1394–1401 • Means B, Habina K, Swan G, et al. Cognitive research on response error in survey questions on smoking. National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Health Stat 6 1992; No. 5 • Navarro AM. Smoking status by proxy and self-report: rate of agreement in different ethnic groups. Tob Control 1999; 8:182–185