VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Exam Preparation Seminar - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Exam Preparation Seminar
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VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Exam Preparation Seminar

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  1. VCE Outdoor and Environmental StudiesExam Preparation Seminar Andrew Mannion OES teacher at Whitefriars College VCAA Chief Assessor for OES study

  2. 1. Preparing for the exams2. Sitting the exam 3. Exam keywords 4. Answering exam questions 5. Overview of OES study6. Questions and wrap-up Outline of the session …

  3. Preparing for the exams Develop a study timeline Include important dates – exam, work, sport, parties, and other commitments Start studying …

  4. Preparing for the exams O B A F G K M Oh Be A Fine Girl, Kiss Me Some general studying tips … Use wasted time Take frequent breaks Write stuff down Use mental imagery to help with memory Mnemonics – eg. Star temperatures Use past papers and the examiner/assessor reports

  5. Sitting the exam Use positive self talk and mental imagery to help visualise success Use reading time to prepare Plan your responses based on the marks and keywords Make sure to read the questions well as well as your responses to them Write legibly Be creative in your answers if you can

  6. Assess • Define • Discuss • Explain • List Exam keywords • Analyse • Compare and contrast • Describe • Evaluate • Identify • Recommend

  7. Answering exam questions The Chief Assessor’s job Thursday: Exam day – write answers and assessment guide Next two weeks: guide 25 assessors through job of marking 2500 exam papers, at least twice

  8. Answering exam questions Break down the answers you write based on the marking scheme and the keywords. Aim to be able to figure out what is required for each mark in every question. Example – try to break down a 4 mark question into 1, 1, 1, 1. It’s easier to answer a 1 mark question than one worth multiple marks.

  9. Answering exam questions Break down the answers you write based on the marking scheme and the keywords. Aim to be able to figure out what is required for each mark in every question. Example – try to break down a 4 mark question into 1, 1, 1, 1. It’s easier to answer a 1 mark question than one worth multiple marks.

  10. The handout contains a list of most of the relevant dot-points for key knowledge and key skills. Overview of OES study

  11. If you were asked to write about your relationship to someone else – a friend, parent, sibling – what would you say? Human relationships are hard to describe in simple terms. Human relationships with non-human things – like environments – are no easier. Try looking at relationships with environments as including: our thoughts about environments (perceptions), what we do in and with these places (interactions), and the effects of these actions (impacts). • feelings • history with that person • things you do together • problems you’ve had What are relationships?

  12. Overview of OES study Be able to write about, and compare and contrast, relationships from different time periods. Be able to link this to environments you’ve visited. Indigenous compared to non-indigenous relationships. Perceptions Interactions Impacts Management strategies Relationships

  13. Avoid bold, sweeping statements – like indigenous relationships were always good, and non-indigenous were always bad. Recognise that in all time periods, and all groups there were good and bad. Try to write about this in as much detail as you can. Break non-indigenous relationships up into time periods: early settlers; Gold rush to Federation; 20th Century Overview of OES study Indigenous compared to non-indigenous relationships.

  14. Overview of OES study Environmental movements. Environmental campaigns (such as Lake Pedder and the Franklin Dam) The rise of environmentalism Know about a key environmental campaign – the Franklin is worth considering – that you can use to illustrate the rise of environmental concern.

  15. Overview of OES study Patterns and types of interactions. Types of interactions – commerce, recreation, conservation, tourism, aesthetic appreciation Changes in patterns of interactions Factors that might affect or influence interactions – including media, technology, commercialisation, background, education, increases in income and leisure time

  16. Overview of OES study Technology as mediator in human-nature relationships. Changes in the materials and design of gear (like clothing and specialist equipment) Improved access and communication (like roads, ski lifts, mobile phones) GPS and navigation Simulated environments (like indoor climbing gyms) Be able to discuss the affect of changing technology on outdoor experiences.

  17. Overview of OES study Be able to discuss possible effects on the environment, when outdoor experiences are marketed and sold. Commercialisation of outdoor experiences. Selling the outdoor experience

  18. Overview of OES study Views of nature. Views and images Environment as resource, gym, cathedral or temple, museum Views of different groups of people – including conservationists, land holders, adventurers, indigenous people, scientists Diversity of views How views about the outdoors shape relationships with the outdoors

  19. Overview of OES study Social responses to risk-taking. Criticism of risk taking Legal responses and sanctions Rules, regulations and restrictions Training and education Zoning in public land Infrastructure development

  20. Overview of OES study Importance of environments. Definitions of biodiversity Importance of biodiversity Importance for individuals (psychological benefits, health, recreation, adventure, rest, inspiration, spiritual benefits, education …) Importance for society (resources, research, medicines, intrinsic values …) Be able to give explanations for the importance of environments for humans.

  21. Overview of OES study Potential impacts of significant environmental damage. Loss of biodiversity Climate change Land degradation Pollution Introduced species

  22. Overview of OES study Be able to tie minimal impact actions into particular environments and/or particular activities. Sustainable interactions. Minimal impact actions

  23. Overview of OES study Be able to write about a conflict. What it was about? Who was involved? What happened? Be able to write about an interest group. Who are they? How did they form? What are their aims? What have they done. Conflicts of interest. Conflicts Interest groups (don’t confuse interest groups and decision makers)

  24. Be able to evaluate these methods. What works and what doesn’t? What are the likely effects? Overview of OES study Methods to influence decision making. Direct action Lobbying Petitions, letters and postcards Use of media Research and publication Meetings Partnerships and coalitions

  25. Overview of OES study Decision making processes. Consultative groups Legislation Management plans (?) Use of the court system Police action (?) Political processes Know the pros and cons of these. Be able to target processes to real or imaginary scenarios.

  26. Overview of OES study Management strategies. Parks and reserves Zoning in parks Management plans Codes of conduct Weed and pest species control Fencing, signs, education Re-vegetation Research Indigenous management strategies Fire control

  27. Overview of OES study Environmental policies. Local council policies Business and industry policies State government policies and laws (such as Flora and Fauna Guarantee [FFG] Act) Federal policies and laws (such as Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act) International treaties and agreements (such as World Heritage and RAMSAR conventions) Know about one of these. What’s it for? What does it do?

  28. Overview of OES study Maintaining sustainable environments. Renewable energy options Ecotourism Landcare, Coastcare, Land for wildlife Green architecture Sustainability guidelines

  29. Link the theory to practice revisit your practical trips (in your mind, through images and photos, on paper through writing and reading about them) what were key events on the trips? go back through the course outline and tie in aspects of the trips to as many areas as you can

  30. Be aware • current events • local initiatives • local, national and international politics • land management issues What’s happening now that you could use to help you in your exam?

  31. Questions and wrap-up Past exams and examiner’s reports are available at the VCAA web site (www.vcaa.vic.edu.au) – you should try to do each of these and check out the answers Questions …?

  32. … good luck with your exams!