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Sentences: Simple, Complex, & Compound PowerPoint Presentation
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Sentences: Simple, Complex, & Compound

Sentences: Simple, Complex, & Compound

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Sentences: Simple, Complex, & Compound

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  1. Sentences:Simple, Complex, & Compound

  2. Review: Clauses • To understand certain types of sentences, you have to understand certain types of clauses, as studied in our last unit. • Remember: an independent clause is a fancy name for a sentence. • A dependent clause is a group of words that has a subject and predicate, but cannot stand alone (it doesn’t express a complete thought).

  3. What is a SIMPLE Sentence? A simple sentence is a stand-alone independent clause without any dependent clauses.

  4. Sample SIMPLE Sentences Independent Clause / Simple Sentence #1: My sister’s cat really annoys me. Independent Clause / Simple Sentence #2: My brother and I are tired. Independent Clause / Simple Sentence #3: The trees bent and swayed in the wind. Independent Clause / Simple Sentence #4: A small, furry squirrel ran up a pole. (Notice how sentence #2 has compound subjects and sentence #3 has compound predicates.)

  5. What is a COMPLEX Sentence? A complex sentence is a sentence with an independent clause AND one or more dependent clauses.

  6. Sample COMPLEX Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #1 complex: Independent Clause: My sister’s cat really annoys me. + Dependent Clause: when it bites my feet = Complex Sentence: My sister’s cat really annoys me when it bites my feet. OR When it bites my feet, my sister’s cat really annoys me.

  7. Sample COMPLEX Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #2 complex: Independent Clause: My brother and I are tired. + Dependent Clause: after football practice ends = Complex Sentence: My brother and I are tired after football practice ends. OR After football practice ends, my brother and I are tired.

  8. Sample COMPLEX Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #3 complex: Independent Clause: The trees bent and swayed in the wind. + Dependent Clause: while the rain poured down = Complex Sentence: The trees bent and swayed in the wind while the rain poured down. OR While the rain poured down, the trees bent and swayed in the wind.

  9. Sample COMPLEX Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #4 complex: Independent Clause: A small, furry squirrel ran up a pole. + Dependent Clause: since the cat chased it = Complex Sentence: A small, furry squirrel ran up a pole since the cat chased it. OR Since the cat chased it, a small, furry squirrel ran up a pole.

  10. Complex Sentence Practice In each pair of sentences, decide which one is complex: 1. a. I would like my fresh salad before my sirloin steak. b. Jenny must clean her room before she goes. 2. a. After the news is over, let’s play a game. b. Patrick will line up after Susan, Terri, and Robert. 3. a. He will do his homework because it’s due tomorrow. b. The final game was postponed because of the rain. 4. a. When will you come to my house to play air hockey? b. When the moon is full, strange things happen.

  11. Complex Sentence Practice The pink sentence is complex: 1. a. I would like my fresh salad before my sirloin steak. b. Jenny must clean her room before she goes. 2. a. After the news is over, let’s play a game. b. Patrick will line up after Susan, Terri, and Robert. 3. a. He will do his homework because it’s due tomorrow. b. The final game was postponed because of the rain. 4. a. When will you come to my house to play air hockey? b. When the moon is full, strange things happen. Remember: A dependent clause must have a subject AND predicate!

  12. What is a COMPOUND Sentence? A compound sentence is a sentence with two independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction.

  13. What is a COORDINATING CONJUNCTION? These are the 7 coordinating conjunction used to join compound sentences: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so (FYI: for = because) Just remember: F A N B O Y S

  14. Punctuating Compound Sentences Use a comma AFTER the 1st independent clause, BEFORE the coordinating conjunction!

  15. Sample COMPOUND Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #1 compound: Independent Clause: My sister’s cat really annoys me. + Coordinating Conjunction: but + Independent Clause: It is cute. = Compound Sentence: My sister’s cat really annoys me, but it is cute.

  16. Sample COMPOUND Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #2 compound: Independent Clause: My brother and I are tired. + Coordinating Conjunction: so + Independent Clause: We are going to bed. = Compound Sentence: My brother and I are tired, so we are going to bed.

  17. Sample COMPOUND Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #3 compound: Independent Clause: The trees bent and swayed in the wind. + Coordinating Conjunction: for + Independent Clause: The storm was approaching. = Compound Sentence: The trees bent and swayed in the wind, for the storm was approaching.

  18. Sample COMPOUND Sentences Here’s how you make simple sentence #4 compound: Independent Clause: A small, furry squirrel ran up a pole. + Coordinating Conjunction: yet + Independent Clause: It wasn’t being chased. = Compound Sentence: A small, furry squirrel ran up a pole, yet it wasn’t being chased.

  19. POP Quiz Decide whether each sentence is simple (S), complex (CX), or compound (CD). • The desk was made of wood and metal. • When I left home, it hadn’t rained yet. • What’s on TV after this show? • I have some money, but I want to save it. • Bill and Sam played baseball and football today. • I’m going to read while I wait for my mom. • She’s tired, for she stayed up too late. • I want a Coke, and I’ll have pizza, too. • Mrs. Parker has a big, black, sassy cat. • Tammy finished her test although she was careless.

  20. POP Quiz Answers Decide whether each sentence is simple (S), complex (CX), or compound (CD). • The desk was made of wood and metal. (S) • When I left home, it hadn’t rained yet. (CX) • What’s on TV after this show? (S) • I have some money, but I want to save it. (CD) • Bill and Sam played baseball and football today. (S) • I’m going to read while I wait for my mom. (CX) • She’s tired, for she stayed up too late. (CD) • I want a Coke, and I’ll have pizza, too. (CD) • Mrs. Parker has a big, black, sassy cat. (S) • Tammy finished her test although she was careless. (CX)