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Métis Nationalism

Métis Nationalism

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Métis Nationalism

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  1. Métis Nationalism The Manitoba Act

  2. What is it? The Manitoba act was when the Red Rover colony persuaded the federal government to admit Manitoba as Canada’s fifth province.

  3. How did it happen? Even though they outnumbered the Europeans, the Métis people of the Red River settlement were not treated the same as the Europeans. The Dominion government tried to take over their land, but the Métis resisted. They decided that they wanted more rights, and so formed a provisional government. In 1870, the head of the provisional government, Louis Riel, set out to Ottawa to get rights for the Métis people.

  4. In 1870, the head of the provisional government, Louis Riel, set out to Ottawa to get rights for the Métis people. After some negotiations, the Red River settlement entered the confederation as Canada’s fifth province. The Metis were granted the land they currently resided on, plus an additional 1.4 million acres for their children to live on.

  5. Shortly after the Manitoba Act, military forces were sent out by John A. Macdonald to gain control of the province. Louis Riel fled south to live in exile. The government then proceeded to try to acquire Manitoba for little money.

  6. By 1884, two thirds of Metis people had moved out of Manitoba, mostly moving to Alberta or Saskatchewan. The Métis tried again to get their own land in the northwest, but they were ignored.

  7. Today, Manitoba is still a province, all thanks to the Métis people. This should still hold significance to the Métis people and all Canadians. Métis fought for their own rights and for their nation, and were successful in doing so.

  8. Bibliography “Metis Nationalism” March 17, 2010 http://d2l.adlc.ca/content/Schools-AD/AirdrieLearning-S0404/SocialSH/SST2771-5cT1Wa-S0404-16Jul09/SS2013/MetisNationalism.html “Manitoba Act – The Canadian Encyclopedia” March 17, 2010 http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0005070