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Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education

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Early Childhood Education

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  1. Getting it Right from the Beginning Early Childhood Education 2012 Community Indicators Symposium   Human Capital Development and Education: Early Childhood, K-12, Workforce Preparedness February 10, 2012

  2. Early Childhood Education (ECE)Overview of Presentation

  3. Why is this Important?

  4. Why is this Important?Number of Children in Region Growing Rapidly 553,414 383,397 Source: Annie E. Casey Kids Count Data Book, http://datacenter.kidscount.org/

  5. Why is this Important? Increase in Women in Workforce

  6. Why is this Important? Over Half of Young Children in Care of Other Adults while Parents Working 315,446 young children Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2005-2009 average

  7. Why is this Important? Science, Research, ROI

  8. Science and ResearchNature and Nurture: Synapse formation in the first three years Source: Core Concepts in the Science of EarlyChildhoodDevelopment, Center for the Developing Child, Harvard University, C.A. Nelson (2000)

  9. Science and ResearchNature and Nurture: Disparities in vocabulary begin at 18 months, significant by 36 months College Educated Cumulative Vocabulary (Words) Working Class Parents Low Income Parents Source: Hart, B., & Risley, T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experiences of young American children.

  10. Longitudinal ResearchAbecedarian Project provided high quality child care in early years, tracked children through adulthood

  11. Return on InvestmentLifetime Effects: The HighScope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40 Showed 16 to 1 ROI Source: HighScope Perry Preschool Study: Lifetime Effects: The HighScope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40 (2005)

  12. Return on Investment60-80% of long-term benefits of quality early education go to society Benefits to Individual Increased earnings Benefits to Society Crime-cost Savings Reduced Special Education and Welfare Increased Income Taxes Perry Preschool Study Abecedarian Study

  13. Return on InvestmentHigher ROI for Early Investments Source: James J. Heckman, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate in Economics, University of Chicago, 2008

  14. Return on InvestmentHigher ROI for Early Investments “The fiscally responsible thing to do is to invest more resources in early childhood education. It is something for which we must find the dollars because it saves money as early as kindergarten and builds equity throughout the life of the child. Early childhood education creates a taxpayer who reduces his or her own tax burden through greater productivity, healthier living and stronger contributions to society.” Source: James J. Heckman, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate in Economics, University of Chicago, 2008

  15. Return on Investment Public Expenditures Compared to Brain Development % of Brain growth per year, 0 – 18 years Cumulative Percent of Public Spending on Children 0 - 18 Source: R. Haveman and B. Wolfe, “The Determinants of Children’s Attainments: A review of Methods and Findings,” Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 33, December 1995, pp. 1829-1878. Updated in 2005.

  16. What makes up the Early Childhood Education System?

  17. The ECE System: 5 ComponentsHome Care, Informal Care, Child Care, Pre-K and Head Start * This could also be another family member or other person who has custody and primary responsibility for a child.

  18. Unregulated CareParents, Relatives, Neighbors, Friends – 65%

  19. Regulated ECE35%of all Children, 0-5, in Texas Gulf Coast participate in regulated ECE System Within Regulated System. . . *The number of children in child care in our region is based on an estimate using national Census Bureau surveys as the state does not track this number.

  20. Regulated ECEThree systems

  21. Regulated ECE SystemHead Start – Funded by Federal Government * Very small amount of funding for “Early Head Start” to serve infants, toddlers

  22. Regulated ECE SystemHead Start – Children Eligible, Children Served Source: Head Start Program Fact Sheet, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2009 Data; Annie E. Casey Kids Count, 2009 Data

  23. The Regulated ECE SystemPublic Prekindergarten – Local ISD, State, Federal * 3 year olds served if spaces available, or if eligible for Preschool Program for Children with Disabilities (PPCD)

  24. Regulated ECE SystemChild Care System – Primarily funded by tuition, limited federal subsidies

  25. Regulated ECE SystemChild Care System – Cost of Care in Texas Average annual cost of child care centers rival cost of Texas Public University Source: “Child Care in America: Fact 2011, National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, 2011

  26. How do you Measure Quality and Impact in ECE?

  27. Measuring Quality, Impact in ECETwo Approaches • Process Indicators are more thorough, require observation of program to track progress • Structural indicators represent standards of systems that can either be verified through observation or through self-report • Certain structural indicators positively correlate to child well-being, school outcomes

  28. Measuring Quality, Impact in ECEState Strategy for Measuring Quality Nearly one-half of states and District of Columbia have a Quality Rating and Information System (QRIS) that provides parents and state officials with process indicators on ECE system Texas in the process of developing framework for QRIS

  29. Measuring Quality, Impact in ECEExample: Process Indicator, College Bound from Birth Assessment of Quality of Classroom Environment % of Classrooms in Low, Minimal, Good/Excellent Categories Over Time Baseline- 2008 2011

  30. Early Childhood Education Example: Structural Indicator, Teacher Education Child Care Programs in Texas Gulf Coast Source: Collaborative for Children, QualiFind Database, 2011

  31. Measuring Quality, Impact in ECEStep Toward QRIS • Collect data Update • Research-based • Oregon Model • “Consumer Report” layout • Self-Report • State and National data • Excellent • Good • Minimum Standards • On-line updating • Confirm • Validate sample • Established Indicators • Rate programs Source: Collaborative for Children, QualiFind Database, 2011

  32. Measuring Quality, Impact in ECEQualiFind Indicators

  33. Early Childhood Education Indicators

  34. Early Childhood Education Community Indicators: Teacher Education N = 1,441 programs 130,132 children N = 294 programs 54,347 children N = 95 programs 8,986 children # of Programs Source: Collaborative for Children, QualiFind Database, 2011

  35. Early Childhood Education Trend Line – Teacher Education 891 programs 49% 564 programs 31% # of Programs with Teachers Rated “Excellent” January 2010 – June 2011 represents time that Federal Stimulus Funding Invested in Gulf Coast Region with focus on improving teacher education and training Source: Collaborative for Children’s QualiFind Early Childhood Education Database, 2011

  36. Early Childhood Education Community Indicators: Teacher Education

  37. Early Childhood Education Community Indicators: Teacher to Child Ratios N=1,652 N=105 N=434 % of Programs Source: Collaborative for Children’s QualiFind Early Childhood Education Database, 2011

  38. Early Childhood Education Community Indicators: Teacher to Child Ratios # of Programs with “Excellent” Teacher-to-Child Ratios Source: Collaborative for Children’s QualiFind Early Childhood Education Database, 2011

  39. Early Childhood Education Community Indicators: Teacher to Child Ratios

  40. Public Policy Recommendations

  41. Public Policy Recommendations Source: Center for Houston’s Future Early Childhood Education Advisory Committee

  42. Public Policy Recommendations Source: Center for Houston’s Future Early Childhood Education Advisory Committee

  43. Extra Slides

  44. Regulated ECE SystemHead Start Issues

  45. Regulated ECE SystemPublic Prekindergarten Issues

  46. Research on Impact of Pre-KImpact of Oklahoma’s Universally Available, High Quality Prekindergarten Program on School Readiness Evaluation shows significant gains by all sub-groups for children participating in program compared to non-participants. Test Score Gains Source: Gormley, W.T., et.al (2004). The Effects of Oklahoma’s Universal Pre-K Program on School Readiness. Washington, DC: Center for Research on Children in the United States, Georgetown University.

  47. Regulated ECE SystemEvaluation of HISD Pre-K Program, 2011 Source: HISD Research Department, 2011

  48. Regulated ECE SystemEvaluation of HISD Pre-K Program, 2011 Results of Stanford in Kindergarten Assessment in English Standardized Score (NCE’s) Standardized Scores: Below 34: Below Average 35 – 65: Average Above 65: Above Average

  49. Regulated ECE SystemEvaluation of HISD Pre-K Program, 2011 Results of Aprenda in Kindergarten Assessment in Spanish Standardized Score (NCE’s) Standardized Scores: Below 34: Below Average 35 – 65: Average Above 65: Above Average

  50. Regulated ECE SystemChild Care represents huge family expense Source: Center for Public Policy Priorities, National Center for Children in Poverty, 2009