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Punishment does not Motivate Students Teachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior PowerPoint Presentation
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Punishment does not Motivate Students Teachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior

Punishment does not Motivate Students Teachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior

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Punishment does not Motivate Students Teachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior

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  1. Punishment does not Motivate Students Teachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior

  2. Teachers and educators generally must comprehend the psychological basis of punishment if they wish to understand its use. Generally, punishment is ineffective as a motivator.

  3. Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens.

  4.  The data regarding prisons does not mean punishment is useless when applied to all students; however, it does not always bring about a positive change. All teachers are aware that only a small percentage of students in most schools are responsible for the majority of serious problems. These students are typically students who have already been punished repeatedly.

  5. Why do Schools and Teachers Endorse Punishment of Students? First, there is the matter of protecting other students from danger. There are, regrettably, dangerous students who can harm their innocent classmates. Schools need ways of assuring a safe environment for most students, whose primary purpose at school is to learn.

  6.  However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".

  7. Can Punishment Motivate Students to Behave Positively? Punishment does not affect all students the same way. Punishment works best with “good” people and it reminds the well-behaved of consequences if they go astray. Students who come from stable homes with clear values and caring parents are motivated to please those parents by positive behavior. The fact that breaking the rules can lead to unhappy parents is scary and, in a sense, motivating.

  8.  These students are usually intrinsically motivated because of their "functional families" to avoid misbehavior. However, peer pressure and the need to feel independent sometimes wins them over to the “dark side.” That behavior is usually experimental and self-correcting. Appropriate punishment with children who are fortunate enough to want to avoid consequences may be effective. It is important to understand that the punishment may not be causing any major behavioral changes; it is only calling causing the student to return to behavior that he or she has already learned. That may be quite enough for the teacher.

  9.  If punishment is used with well-adjusted, intrinsically motivated behavior it is not likely to motivate them to achieve. Punishment creates counterproductive stress, frustrations and a need to avoid threatening situations. For example a student might mean try to avoid school by feigning illness.

  10. Motivating the Students to Make Major Changes in Behavior There are many children for whom punishment is no big deal. They may be lacking positive family values. These are the same students who typically provide schools with the majority of major behavior problems. They often are attention-starved children who get attention by misbehaving at home and at school. After all, negative attention is better than being ignored.

  11.  Punishing students may only serve to prove to them once again that the world is an uncaring, unfriendly place and it is occupied by other people who punish. For these unfortunate children, punishment intensifies resentment and hostility. Often these students are not easy to “warm up to” and frequently have friends who display similar attitudes and behavior. They present a challenge for schools – the students who need the most encouragement are the least likely to receive it.

  12.  That is true unless school personnel adopt a plan that embraces problem students. The key is to be proactive and identify troublesome students early. Once these students are identified and before their behavior gets them into serious trouble, they should receive extra encouragement for positive behavior and academic achievement. Teachers should not try to “catch” these students so that they can be punished, but present the most caring attitude that they can.

  13.  In class, any plans to discipline students should be incremental. They should offer warnings before disciplinary actions are taken. When disciplinary action is necessary it should be consistent and calmly enforced. Schools should offer counseling in anger management and social skills. Parents of students with behavior problems should have access to group counseling and be encouraged to maintain contact with teachers.

  14. Punishment is widely used in schools although it does not achieve the best results in the long term. Punishment is most effective in the temporary suppression of some types of behavior, which in some cases is sufficient. It is most effective with students who learn values in a successfully functioning family. Such students are intrinsically motivated not to want to disappoint their parents.

  15. On the other hand, students who chronically misbehave do not respond to punishment as might be expected, and may even become worse. Schools should be proactive in identifying and providing programs that encourage good behavior rather than punish bad behavior.

  16. Punishment does not MotivateStudentsTeachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior Teachers and educators generally must comprehend the psychological basis of punishment if they wish to understand its use. Schools should be proactive in identifying and providing programs that encourage good behavior rather than punish bad behavior.

  17. 1 According to lines 1-5 a teacher cannot understand how to use punishment ___ he/she understands its psychological basis. • because • although • if • unless

  18. 1 According to lines 1-5 a teacher cannot understand how to use punishment ___ he/she understands its psychological basis. • because • although • if • unless

  19. Punishment does not MotivateStudentsTeachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior Teachers and educators generally must comprehend the psychological basis of punishment if they wish to understand its use. Schools should be proactive in identifying and providing programs that encourage good behavior rather than punish bad behavior.

  20. Punishment does not MotivateStudentsTeachers Need Techniques That Encourage Positive Behavior Teachers and educators generally must comprehend the psychological basis of punishment if they wish to understand its use. Schools should be proactive in identifying and providing programs that encourage good behavior rather than punish bad behavior.

  21. Conditionals If he studies, he will succeed.

  22. Conditionals If he studies, he will succeed. (condition), (result).

  23. Conditionals Unless he studies, he won’t (will not) succeed. (condition), (result).

  24. Conditionals He will succeed if he studies . (result) (condition).

  25. First Condition If he studies, he will succeed. (Present Simple), (will) V1. It will probably happen.

  26. 1 According to lines 1-5 a teacher cannot understand how to use punishment ___ he/she understands its psychological basis. • because • although • if • unless

  27. 2 According to lines 6-11, what percentage of criminals do NOT repeat their crimes? ___________

  28. 2 According to lines 6-11, what percentage of criminals do NOTrepeat their crimes? ___________

  29. 2 According to lines 6-11, what percentage of criminals do NOT repeat their crimes? ___________

  30. 6-11 Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens.

  31. 6-11 Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens.

  32. 6-11 Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens.

  33. 2 According to lines 6-11, what percentage of criminals do NOT repeat their crimes? Less than 30%

  34. 3 According to lines 6-16 who are persistent criminals compared to? ____________

  35. 3 According to lines 6-16 who are persistent criminals compared to? ____________

  36. 6-16 Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens. The data regarding prisons does not mean punishment is useless when applied to all students; however, it does not always bring about a positive change. All teachers are aware that only a small percentage of students in most schools are responsible for the majority of serious problems. These students are typically students who have already been punished repeatedly.

  37. 6-16 Prisons prove the failure of punishment as a way of correcting behavior.  Repetition of criminal behavior rates for criminals who have been in prison in the United States are over 70%. Realistically, some people need to be incarcerated to protect society, but because the majority of them are eventually released, it would be a good thing if prisoners "came out and stayed out". For this, they need to be motivated to become better citizens. The data regarding prisons does not mean punishment is useless when applied to all students; however, it does not always bring about a positive change. All teachers are aware that only a small percentage of students in most schools are responsible for the majority of serious problems. These students are typically students who have already been punished repeatedly.

  38. 3 According to lines 6-16 who are persistent criminals compared to? students

  39. 4 What does the word "it" in line 24 refer to? _________________

  40. it However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".

  41. it However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".

  42. it However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".

  43. it However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".

  44. 4 What does the word "it" in line 24 refer to? punishment

  45. 5 What are the two purposes of punishment that are mentioned in lines 22-27?

  46. 5 What are the two purposes of punishment that are mentioned in lines 22-27?

  47. 22-27 However, many years of research have shown quite clearly that while punishment can suppress behavior, it is a poor motivator for positive change. Punishment is used because it’s quick and easy. Whether or not it changes behavior in a positive way may be a secondary consideration. Punishment also serves as a sort of retribution or "payback". Teachers sometimes need to dispense quick justice to make themselves or an offended student feel better. Punishment of this type helps "even the score".