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Malaria: Success through a Global Partnership Trey Watkins External Relations

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  1. Malaria: Success through a Global Partnership Trey Watkins External Relations Roll Back Malaria Partnership

  2. Current situation • Malaria overview • RBM’s role • Progress through Partnership • The Power of Advocacy • Malaria & the changing • Development Landscape

  3. Malaria: the current situation Global figures 2013: At risk: 3.3 bln Cases: 207 m Deaths 627,000 IN 20113 14% of global cases 7% of global deaths IN 2013 80% of global cases 90% of global deaths

  4. Malaria 101 • Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, which is transmitted via the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. • In the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells • Symptoms: Symptoms of malaria include fever, headache, and vomiting, and usually appear between 10 and 15 days after the mosquito bite. • If not treated, malaria can quickly become life-threatening by disrupting the blood supply to vital organs. • Malaria is completely preventable and treatable!

  5. The Malaria Toolbox: Proven & Cost-Effective Interventions • Prevention • Long-lasting Insecticide-treated nets (LLINS) • Indoor Residual Spraying • Diagnosis • Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) • Treatment • Prompt treatment with Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs)

  6. Foundations UN Special Envoy for Malaria RBM Partnership: Convene, Coordinate, Facilitate Donor Countries Multilaterals Endemic countries NGOs Research & Academia Private Sector Ex officio members **This slide is not a comprehensive compilation of RBM partners.

  7. Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP):a global plan to eliminate malaria • OBJECTIVES • Reduce global malaria deaths to near zero by the of end 2015 • Reduce global malaria cases by 75% by end 2015 (from 2000 levels) • Eliminate malaria by end 2015 in 10 new countries (since 2008) and in the WHO Europe region

  8. Partnering for Progress Against Malaria Achievements to date • Dramatic increase in global funding for malaria • Less than US $100 million in 2000 • US $2.5 billion in 2012 • Remarkable record of impact • Mortality rate reduced by 45% worldwide 2000-2012 • 49% for Sub-Saharan Africa 2000-2012 • 3.3 million deaths averted 2001-2012 (90% CU5) • Internationalcommitment • Annual UNGA Resolution appeals for increased, harmonized, predictable and sustained bilateral and multilateral assistance to combat malaria • In January 2012, UNSG Ban- Ki Moon announced malaria as one of his top priorities under his second mandate • Political will continues to increase (ALMA, APLMA)

  9. Net coverage: Africa Source: WHO World Malaria Report 2013

  10. Proportion of suspected malaria cases receiving a diagnostic test (in public health facilities), 2000-2012 Source: WHO World Malaria Report 2013

  11. But we’re not done yet… • Despite progress, malaria still causes • 207 million cases around the world each year • 627,000 deaths • Malaria costs countries around the world billions each year in lost productivity and healthcare • In Africa, where the burden is highest, malaria costs the continent an estimated minimum of US $12 billion each year in lost productivity alone • Malaria kills 1 child every minute

  12. Malaria Financing, 2000-2016 Source: WHO World Malaria Report 2013

  13. Financial Threats: Funding Gaps • Challenging economic times have left us with significant funding gaps that threaten continued progress: • US $2.6 billion gap annually for global malaria control efforts through 2020 • US $3.6 billion gap for Africa alone through 2015

  14. Biological Threats:Resistance • Resistance to artemisinin has been identified in four countries in the Greater Mekong subregion: Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. • Resistance to all classes of insecticides, mostly to pyrethroids

  15. Advocacy: Placing Malaria at the Top of the International Agenda

  16. United Against Malaria: leveraging the power of football to drive progress against malaria in Africa

  17. Investing in malaria means investing in development: • Malaria control accelerates progress in… • MDG 1 (poverty reduction): Malaria control interventions help lift poor people out of poverty. • MDG 2 (universal education): Malaria contributes to approximately 25-50% absenteeism in Africa. • MDG 3 (gender empowerment): Malaria impacts women and girls disproportionately. • MDG 4 (child survival): Malaria control interventions reduce significantly child mortality • MDG 5 (maternal health): Pregnant women are 4 times more likely to contract malaria. •   MDG 6 (infectious diseases): Malaria is one of the diseases in MDG 6. There are considerable geographic overlap among malaria, TB and HIV and efforts to combat these three killer diseases often are done in cross-cutting fashion. • MDG 7 (environmental sustainability): Malaria control takes into account environmental implications to ensure human and environmental health are preserved and maximized. • MDG 8 (develop global partnerships): Malaria control requires diverse expertise and a high level of coordination and working in partnership.

  18. The countdown to 2015: • malaria & the changing development landscape • Maintaining progress toward MDGs • Positioning malaria in the Post-2015 Development Agenda • Social determinants of disease • Case for investment • Multisectoral approach • Regional/Cross-border collaboration

  19. "Only rarely have we seen a public health initiative provideso much return on investment” - Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General, speaking on RBM, September 2011 For more information: RBM Secretariat – Office at the United Nations in New York (t) 646 626 6054 (f) 646 626 6080 kwatkins@rbmny.org