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STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE MANAGEMENT PowerPoint Presentation
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STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE MANAGEMENT

STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE MANAGEMENT

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STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE MANAGEMENT

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  1. STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE MANAGEMENT Chapter 19 -From Cyber Terrorism to State Actors’ Covert Cyber Operations, Pg. 229 Chapter by Jan Kallberg, BhavaniThuraisingham

  2. Section 4: Future Threats and Cyber Security 19. From Cyber Terrorism to State Actors’ Covert Cyber Operations, Pg. 229 • Historically, since the Internet started to become a common feature in our lives, hackers have been seen as a major threat. This view has repeatedly been entrenched and distributed by media coverage and commentaries through the years. Instead the first 20 years of the Internet was acceptably secure due to the limited abilities of the attackers, compared to the threat generated from a militarized Internet with state actors conducting cyber operations. • In reality, the Internet has a reversed trajectory for its security; it has become more unsafe over time and moved from a threat to the individual to a national security threat. The entry of state actors creates a contested cyberspace where intelligence, economic espionage, information operations, and psychological operations radically changed the fundamentals for Internet security. The state actor seeks to exploit weaknesses in the targeted national infrastructure, industrial base's connection to the global networked grid, and take advantage of the fact that our populations heavily rely on the Internet.

  3. Section 4: Future Threats and Cyber Security 19. From Cyber Terrorism to State Actors’ Covert Cyber Operations, Pg. 229 • The aggressive state actor has an advantage in cyberspace due to the weaknesses in attribution, which work as a standing invite to conduct proxy wars, utilizing criminal networks or aligned political groups, to carry out the attacks with little risk for detection. This requires a modified view on cyberspace role in national security. • The threat from cyber operations will increase in the next decade, even if we have implemented extensive information security. The Internet and the application layer become a globally contested domain where the entrance of state actors as contestants and aggressors create a radical shift. The early hackers and information thieves had limited resources and mainly a financial goal. State-run operations have a complete different set of targets and goals. • If states collect vulnerabilities in targeted systems, utilize the whole covert spectrum, and instead of attacking themselves uses terrorist groups as proxies, then cyber terrorism is a tangible and relevant national security threat.

  4. Section 4: Future Threats and Cyber Security 19. From Cyber Terrorism to State Actors’ Covert Cyber Operations, Pg. 229 • The digital environment where critical assets can be copied, sent, and forwarded within seconds, ushers in a symbiosis between aggressive adversarial state actors and terrorist networks when the state actor can produce military-grade cyber weapons for the terrorists to use. Waltz (1990) argued that the power embedded in nuclear arms is not what you do but what you can do. The outsourced proxy cyber war from state actor to cyber terrorists operates along the same lines as military-grade cyber weapons dispersed to violent groups and militant political groups create extensive uncertainty. This uncertainty is based on what an aggressor can do— not what they actually do. • This development creates an asymmetric covert conflict with an anonymous aggressor and a reactive targeted society. Terrorists can reach their objectives, create damage, influence policy, and leverage the disproportional power relation between terrorists and the defending state.