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Chapter 17: Relative Pronouns PowerPoint Presentation
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Chapter 17: Relative Pronouns

Chapter 17: Relative Pronouns

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Chapter 17: Relative Pronouns

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  1. Chapter 17: Relative Pronouns

  2. Subordinate Clauses • Also known as dependent clauses. • Can’t stand alone in a sentence. • Do not express a complete thought. • Attached to main/independent clauses. • Contain subject and predicate, but sound incomplete when they stand alone.

  3. Relative Pronouns • In English, the relative pronouns are that, which, whichever, who, whoever, whom, whose, whosoever, whomever. • Ex: The boywhom I loveis named Jim. • Main clause: The boy is named Jim. • Subordinate clause: whom I love

  4. Relative Pronouns • Refer back to anantecedent in the main clause. • An antecedent is the noun or noun phrase to which a pronoun refers. • Ex: The boy whom I love is named Jim. • Pronoun: whom • Antecedent: boy

  5. Relative Pronoun • Relative clause provides extra information about the antecedent that is not necessary for comprehension of the main clause. • Ex: The boy whom I love is named Jim. • Without the relative clause: The boy is named Jim.

  6. Relative Pronoun • Since it refers back to the antecedent, they agree in gender and number. • The relative pronoun gets its case from its function in the relative clause. • Ex: The boywhomI love is named Jim. • Gender: masculine (refers back to the boy) • Number: singular (there’s only one boy) • Case: accusative (direct object of verb ‘love’ in the relative clause)

  7. Relative Pronouns

  8. Relative Clauses • Usually, they begin with the relative pronoun and end with the verb of the subordinate clause. • Ex: Puellacui librum datest fortunata.

  9. Relative Clauses Relative pronouns can also be used in conjunction with prepositions. Viros ad civitatem in quā eras misit. If you use the preposition cum, it gets attached to the end of the relative. Nauta quōcum navigavisti te laudavit.