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Database for Energy Efficiency Resource Update Project Information and Final Results

Database for Energy Efficiency Resource Update Project Information and Final Results

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Database for Energy Efficiency Resource Update Project Information and Final Results

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  1. Database for Energy Efficiency Resource Update ProjectInformation and Final Results A DEER Presentation at CALMAC Meeting Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco September 21, 2005

  2. DEER Update • Introduction and History • DEER • Measure Cost Study • Objectives and EE Regulatory/Policy Context • Project Management Structure • Program Advisory Committee • Technical Committee • Decision-making Processes and Orientation • Challenges and Accomplishments

  3. DEER UpdateProject Implementation Structure and Consultant Team Roles Presenters: Gary Cullen – Itron Floyd Keneipp – Summit Blue Measure Savings Team Itron, J. J. Hirsch Associates, Quantum Inc, Synergy Measure Cost Team Summit Blue Consulting, Heschong-Mahone Group

  4. Shahana Samiullah, SCE (Project Manager) Ingrid Bran, PG&E (MCS Project Manager) Tim Drew, Energy Division, CPUC Adriana Merlino, Energy Division, CPUC Christine Tam, ORA, CPUC Sylvia Bender, CEC Mike Messenger, CEC Andrew Sickels, SDG&E (Project Manager 2002-03 phase) Jennifer Barnes, PG&E Leonel Campoy, SCE Craig Tyler, Tyler Associates (PG&E representative 2002-03 phase) Jay Luboff (former ED representative 2002-03 phase) Eli Kollman (former ED representative 2002-03 phase) Others Project Advisory Team

  5. Provide feedback and direction to the initial work plan Provide unified and consistent advice and direction as issues appeared Review methodological methods and assumptions Review and provide comments on study results Role of Project Advisory Team

  6. ITRON Gary Cullen (Project Manager), Bob Ramirez, Ulrike Mengelberg Coordinate the activities of the consultant and advisory teams Coordinate with the measure cost team Develop the non-weather sensitive residential and commercial sector measure savings Develop the agricultural sector measure savings Coordinate, consolidate, and format the measure savings, cost, and EUL data for uploading In consultation with Synergy, help design the web interface Measure Savings ProjectConsultant Team Roles

  7. JJ Hirsch & Assoc. Jeff Hirsch, Scott Criswell, Paul Reeves, Kevin Madison Develop the analysis software based on the DOE-2 model for weather sensitive measures Suggest methodological directions and solutions Develop the building prototype and conservation measure characteristics Develop the weather sensitive residential and commercial sector measure savings Coordinate data transfer format with Itron and deliver data to Itron for uploading Measure Savings ProjectConsultant Team Roles

  8. Quantum Consulting Mike Rufo Interview potential DEER users Create DEER Periodic Update Plan Identify linkages to EM&V studies Identify new measures to potentially include in future DEER updates Measure Savings ProjectConsultant Team Roles

  9. Synergy Christine Chin-Ryan Develop web interface Populate web interface with data Debug web interface Measure Savings ProjectConsultant Team Roles

  10. Measure costs developed under separate contract by Summit Blue Measure cost team and roles will be discussed later Measure Savings ProjectConsultant Team Roles

  11. What is DEER? • A collection of data for Residential and Non-Residential energy efficiency measures. • It provides a common set of: • Ex ante Savings values: kW, kWh, kBtu; • Measure Costs; and • Effective Measure Life (a.k.a EUL)

  12. Previous DEER Database • Savings estimates and cost estimates were never integrated • Database on hard copy and soft copy • Commercial measures savings had not been updated since 1994 • Residential measures savings more recently in 2001 • No information on EULs

  13. DEER Update • First Phase of DEER Update began in 2003 and included: • Updating savings for non-weather sensitive measures • Updating weather-sensitive models and the software –Measure Analysis Software • Creating a searchable, on-line database

  14. DEER Update • Second Phase of DEER began in 2004 and included: • Revised non weather sensitive lighting measures savings estimates • Completed the Measure Analysis Software for weather sensitive analysis • Developed a limited number of “High Priority” weather sensitive measure savings estimates • Integrated measure cost into the database • Partial release Milestone completed on March 2005 • Frozen to support June 1st EE filing

  15. DEER Update • Final DEER milestone Completed on-line DEER version 2.0 on August 31, 2005 • Supercedes March 2005 DEER version 1.0 • Revised non-weather sensitive data • Added new and updated weather sensitive measures • Added Agricultural measures • Integrated new effective useful life estimates • Completed integration of cost data • Updated the website with the new information

  16. DEER Update Final Report Milestones • Draft Final Report - Sept 30th for PAC • Final Report - October 31st

  17. DEER Update • TOU Profiler– Currently TBD • Too many other issues; other items with higher priority • Definition of kW • Calibration • Unification of kW definition across all measures and end uses • Agreed initially: • Create a Time of use Profiler • Will utilize the DEER eQuest model • The model will be available for download • Preliminary estimate of amount of data • More discussions needed

  18. Measure Cost Study (MCS) Project Team • Marshall Keneipp, Summit Blue Consulting (Project Manager) • Floyd Keneipp, Summit Blue Consulting • Joshua Radoff, Summit Blue Consulting • Cathy Chappell, Heschong Mahone Group, Inc. • Cynthia Austin, Heschong Mahone Group, Inc.

  19. MCS Project Overview • Undertaken to update measure cost estimates within DEER • Previous update conducted in 2001 • Parallel completion schedule to DEER Update • High priority measures complete in March 2005 • Full update completed in August 2005

  20. Measure Cost Study (MCS) Project Scope of effort • 814 separate costs were collected on 287 measure IDs • Many measure IDs have one cost • Some measure IDs have costs for multiple bins (i.e. capacities, purchase volumes, etc.). For example measure D03-410, residential condensing 90 AFUE furnace, has 10 costs - one cost for each of 10 Btu capacities • 625 separate base costs were collected • Some measures were full cost only and did not require base cost estimates • 574 measure labor cost were collected • Some measures were incremental equipment costs only and did not require a labor cost estimate • A total of over 12,100 individual cost observations were collected

  21. Questions/Comments?

  22. Development of DEER ProductsNon-Weather Sensitive Energy Savings Presenter: Gary Cullen – Itron

  23. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL Lighting • Refrigerators • Clothes Washers & Dryers • Dishwashers • Water Heating • Swimming Pool Pumps

  24. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL LightingMeasure Impact = (delta watts/unit * hours/day * days/year * In Service Rate) / 1000 watts/kWh Demand Impact =delta watts/unit * In Service Rate * Peak Hour Load Share The “In Service Factor” is an estimate of the percentage of lamps that are actually used. It is a rough estimate based on utility experience. “Hours of Operation/Day” and “Peak Hour Load Share” from KEMA CFL Metering Study

  25. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL Lighting – Example (14W CFL replace 60W Inc)Measure Impact = (46W * 2.34 hours/day * 365 days/year * 0.9) / 1000 watts/kWh = 35.4 kWh Demand Impact = 46W * 0.9 * 0.081 = 3.35 W

  26. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • RefrigeratorsUsed the Energy Star calculator available on-line at: http://www.energystar.gov Key Input values for the calculator: Refrigerator Type (top, side, or bottom mount freezer) Ice through the door (yes or no) Refrigerator fresh volume (cubic feet) Refrigerator freezer volume (cubic feet)

  27. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Washers Utilized the three recommended Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Tiers for Modified Energy Factor:Used the Energy Star calculator (that utilizes an EF rather than MEF) on-line at:http://www.energystar.gov Estimated the equivalent EF value for CEE MEF values from Energy Star list of approved washers Other key Energy Star variables include: Number of wash cycles/year (E Star value is 392 cycles) Washer capacity (three sizes – 1.5, 2.65, and 3.5 cubic feet) Further disaggregated impacts by water heat and clothes dryer fuel types Fuel impact disagreegations based on ‘Efficiency Vermont” estimates Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.417. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

  28. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Washer – Example (Tier 3 2.65 cu.ft) Measure Impact = (cycles/year * capacity / base EF) – (cycles/year * capacity / measure EF) = (392 * 2.65 / 1.58) – (392 * 2.65 / 4.94) = 447 kWh Demand Impact = Measure Impact * energy/peak factor = 447 kWh * 0.417 = 186.4 W

  29. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Dryer1993 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) minimum efficiency used for base technology: EF = 3.01 for electric dryers EF = 2.67 for gas dryersUsed DOE test procedure guidelines for: Drying cycles per year = 416 UEC of 2.33 kWh/cycle for electric (969 kWh/year) UEC of 8.95 kBtu/cycle for gas (37.2 therms/year) Assumed 416 cycles represented Single Family Assumed 250 cycles for Multi-Family (CEC estimate of 60% less use by MF) Energy savings 5% of energy use. This is a carryover from previous 2001 DEER Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.371. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

  30. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Dryer – Example (SF electric) Measure Impact = Electric base use * Savings Percentage = 969 kWh * 0.05 = 48 kWh Demand Impact = Measure Impact * energy/peak factor = 48 kWh * 0.371 = 17.8 W

  31. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • DishwasherUsed the Energy Star calculator available on-line at: http://www.energystar.gov Key Input values for the calculator: Base Energy Factor (EF) = 0.46 Measure Energy Factor = 0.58 Annual wash cycle (DOE test procedure) = 215 (assume SF) MF wash cycles (assumed to be ~75% of SF) = 160 • Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.371. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

  32. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Water HeatingMeasures: High efficiency water heater (electric EF=0.93, gas EF=0.63) Heat pump water heater (EF=2.9) Point of use water heater low flow showerhead (from 2.5 to 2.0 gallons per minute) Pipe wrap Faucet aerators Savings expressed as % of base use Base use varied by utility service area (same method as 2001) • Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.22. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

  33. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Water HeatingMeasure Saving %: High efficiency water heater – electric - 5.4% High efficiency water heater – gas - 5.0% Heat pump water heater – 69.7% Point of use water heater – 15.0% low flow showerhead – 4.0% Pipe wrap – 4.0% Faucet aerators – 3.0%

  34. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Pool PumpsSingle speed and two speed included Relied on PG&E and SCE engineers for calculating impacts: General assumptions: Average pool size of 25,000 gallons Average water turnover rate of 6-8 hours Average pump motor demand of 1.75 kVA Typical filtration time of 4 to 6 hours For single speed motors, motor downsizing and runtime reductions assumed

  35. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting • Exterior Lighting • Cooking • Copy Machine • Water Heating • Vending Machine Controls • High Efficiency Motors • Agriculture

  36. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting Measures:CFL screw-in lamps CFL hardwire fixtures High intensity discharge (HID) lamps Premium T8 lamps Dimming Ballasts De-lamping fluorescent 4 ft and 8 ft fixtures

  37. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting – Basic MethodologyMeasure Impact = (delta watts/unit * hours/day * days/year * In Service Rate) / 1000 watts/kWh Demand Impact = delta watts/unit * In Service Rate * Peak Hour Load Share

  38. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Exterior Lighting & Exit Signs High intensity discharge (HID) lamps Exit Signs Timeclocks Photocells

  39. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Exterior Lighting & Exit Signs MethodologyHID lamps: delta watts saved * hours of use (4,100 hours) no peak impactsExit Signs: delta watts saved * 8760 hours * Interactive Effects peak = delta watts * Interactive effects * 1.0 (coincidence factor)Timeclocks & Photocells: watts controlled * hours of control no peak impacts

  40. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Cooking High efficiency fryers (gas & electric) High efficiency griddle (gas) Hot food holding cabinet Connectionless steamer

  41. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures Cooking - Methodology Relied primarily on the PG&E technology briefsFor each of these measures, the energy savings calculation methodology is of the form: Savings = (APECRBase – APECREfficient) * Daily Hours * Days Where: APECR = The Average Production Energy Consumption Rate/hour Daily Hours = 12 Days = 365

  42. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Copy Machines – three sizes 0-20 copies/minute 21-44 copies/minute over 45 copies/minute Methodology assumptions from Energy Star calculator

  43. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Vending Machine Controls Characterized in two measures by being installed in: Cold drink vending machines Uncooled snack vending machines Measure savings and characterization from the Pacific Northwest Regional Technical Forum database Methodology assumes operated during off-peak hours, therefore no demand savings

  44. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Water Heating Savings expressed as % of base use Base use varies by building type. Come from the 1994 DEER study Measures: High efficiency gas water heater (7.1% savings) Point of use water heater (10% savings) Water circulation pump time clock (6% savings)

  45. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • High Efficiency Motors Meet premium efficiency standards established by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Base efficiency meets Energy Policy Act (EPACT) minimum Motor sizes range from 1 HP to 200 HP Motor hours of operation vary by industry sector Motor loading from US DOE Motor Master software Peak demand based on a coincidence factor of 0.75

  46. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • High Efficiency Motors - CalculationEnergy savings (kWh) = (Motor HP / EPACT motor efficiency) * kW/HP * hours of operation * motor loading – (motor HP / premium motor efficiency) * kW/HP * hours of operation * motor loading Peak (kW) = (motor HP * kW/HP * coincidence factor / EPACT motor efficiency) - (motor HP * kW/HP * coincidence factor / premium motor efficiency)

  47. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Agricultural Measures Low pressure irrigation sprinkler nozzle Sprinkler irrigation to micro irrigation conversion Infrared film for greenhouses Greenhouse heat curtain Variable frequency drive for dairy pumps Ventilation fans or box fans High volume, low speed fans

  48. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Agricultural Measures Methodology taken from Express Agricultural Working Papers Irrigation savings varied by crop type

  49. Questions/Comments?

  50. Development of DEER Products Weather Sensitive Energy Savings Presenter: Jeff Hirsch – JJ Hirsch & Associates