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BUILDING COORDINATORS, BUILDING PRIMARY CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES PowerPoint Presentation
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BUILDING COORDINATORS, BUILDING PRIMARY CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES

BUILDING COORDINATORS, BUILDING PRIMARY CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES

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BUILDING COORDINATORS, BUILDING PRIMARY CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES

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  1. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER BUILDING COORDINATORS, BUILDING PRIMARY CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES FRIDAY MAY 29, 2009

  2. AGENDA • NORTH RIDGE EARTHQUAKE VIDEO/REVIEW BUILDING COORDINATORS DUTIES • EMERGENCY EVACUATION VIDEO/REVIEW FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES • REVIEW DISASTER AND CRITICAL INCIDENTS • COMMUNICATIONS • BUILDING EVACUATION DRILL THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

  3. CSU NORTHRIDGE EARTHQUAKE VIDEO

  4. BUILDING COORDINATORS PRIMARY BUILDING CONTACTS & FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

  5. Any event that is either naturally occurring, or man-made, which requires action by emergency response personnel. INCIDENT

  6. A hazardous event that can normally be managed at the local level EMERGENCY

  7. Why Prepare and Plan? Emergencies, disaster, accidents and injuries can occur at any time and without warning. And the world we live in mandates it!

  8. Why Prepare and Plan?

  9. LEFT HAND DOSEN’ KNOW WHAT RIGHT HAND IS DOING

  10. BUILDING COORDINATORAND THESAFETY TEAM • THERE ARE THREE KEY PLAYERS IN ANY CRITICAL INCIDENT OR DISASTER OPERATION ON CAMPUS. • THE POLICE DEPARTMENT • THE FIRE DEPARTMENT • THE BUILDING COORDINATOR AND/OR THE PRIMARY BUILDING CONTACT PERSON

  11. Why a Building Emergency Action Plan? You best understand the nature of your work You know potential work place hazards You are familiar with the layout of your facilities You can identify special needs specific to your college/department – i.e., people with disabilities, research, patients, animals, etc. Allows planning for potential small accidents, power outages, hazardous chemical spills, fires, civil disturbance, up to major disaster such as earthquake. It will help to reduce risk and loss of life and facilities.

  12. EMERGENCIES OR DISASTERS • Could be so large in scope that normal emergency first responders like police and fire departments could be substantially delayed. • The actions taken by the building staff could be instrumental in saving lives. • The building coordinator and staff are the people that all employees recognize for reporting building safety problems, and the person who will take charge during an emergency. • The building coordinator, their alternate and staffs are responsible for keeping all people in their building safe. • AT SACRAMENTO STATE THIS ROLE FALLS UPON THE BUILDING COORDINATOR/PRIMARY CONTACT PERSON FOR EACH BUILDING.

  13. BUILDING COORDINATORSRESPONSIBILITIES • Liaison with the Emergency Operations Center during an emergency. • Responsible for conducting a threat assessment during an emergency and make notification to police dispatcher. • Make determination whether to “Shelter-in-Place” or “Evacuate Building”. • Identify Refuge and Retreat areas for each floor.

  14. BUILDING COORDINATORSRESPONSIBILITIES • Develop and keep current the Building’s Emergency Action Plan. • Designate and train Floor Marshals and alternates for each floor or department i.e., “CREATE A BUILDING EMERGENCY TEAM”. • Establish emergency evacuation rally/assembly areas (PRIMARY & SECONDARY) • Let faculty and staff know that you are the Building Coordinator or the Primary Contact Person for the building. • Maintain clipboard with roster of all employees and tenants and have it available in an emergency.

  15. BUILDING COORDINATORSRESPONSIBILITIES • Responsible for obtaining funding for building’s emergency supplies and vests for Building Coordinator and Floor Marshals. • Meet with safety team on regular basis: * Determine any safety issues or concerns; * Conduct training classes for faculty, staff and students: * EOC Coordinator is available to assist with training. • Conduct building evacuation and safety drills: * Mandated at least once a year. * Best to conduct an evacuation once a semester due to turn over of students and staff. • Conduct a threat assessment of building and plan how to counter the threats. * Police Department available to help with your building’s threat assessment.

  16. EMERGENCY EVACUATION VIDEO

  17. FLOOR MARSHALS DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

  18. Emergency Management Best Practices Building Floor Marshals Designated by Building Coordinator Given training in building evacuation procedures Serve the buildings and floors where they work

  19. BUILDING FLOOR MARSHAL MEMBERS RESPONSIBILITIES. • REACT TO ALL FIRE ALARMS AND FOLLOW PROPER EVACUATION PROCEDURES TO ENSURE A SAFE EVACUATION. • IMMEDIATELY PROVIDE A BUILDING STATUS REPORT TO BUILDING COORDINATOR. • VISUALLY SURVEY BUILDINGS ON A DAY-TO-DAY BASIS TO ASSURE THAT THEIR AREAS ARE FREE OF HAZARDS.

  20. ALL FLOOR MARSHALS MUST BECOMEFAMILIAR WITH: • LOCATION OF ALL EXITS – IN AN EMERGENCY, USE THE NEAREST SAFE EXIT. • FLOOR MARSHALS NEED TO ASSESS THE SAFEST EXIT POINT IN AN EMERGENCY AND DIRECT PEOPLE AWAY FROM POTENTIAL HARM.

  21. ALL FLOOR MARSHALS MUST BECOMEFAMILIAR WITH: • LOCATION OF FIRE ALARMS, EMERGENCY PHONES, AND FIRE EXTINGUISHERS. • INSPECT THEM REGULARLY TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE IN WORKING ORDER.

  22. WHEN TO USE A FIRE ALARM

  23. WHENEVER IT IS NECESSARY TO GET PEOPLE OUT OF THE BUILDING NOW DUE TO AN IMMEDIATE LIFE SAFETY ISSUE.

  24. FIRE • IN THE CASE OF FIRE, ALWAYS USE THE FIRE ALARM TO SIGNAL OTHERS TO IMMEDIATELY EVACUATE. TAKE ALL FIRES - - EVEN SMALL ONES SERIOUSLY. SMALL FIRES CAN TURN BIG (AND DEADLY) VERY FAST.

  25. BASIC EVACUATION PROCEDURES • DIRECT PEOPLE TO LEAVE BY THE NEAREST SAFE EXIT. • MOVE PEOPLE AT LEAST 150 YARDS AWAY FROM ALL STRUCTURES. • CHECK FOR INDIVIDUALS THAT NEED AID AND PROVIDE REASONABLE ASSISTANCE TO DISABLED PERSONS. • USE ONLY STAIRS AND NOT ELEVATORS. • DO NOT ALLOW PEOPLE TO RE-ENTER A BUILDING UNTIL THE UNIVERSITY POLICE, FIRE DEPARTMENT OR BUILDING COORDINATOR DETERMINES THAT IT IS SAFE.

  26. EVACUATION BUILDING SWEEP • AFTER AN EVACUATION, PERFORM A QUICK CHECK, PROVIDED IT IS SAFE FOR YOU TO REMAIN IN THE BUILDING, TO ASSURE THAT EVERYONE HAS EXITED. • USE VERBAL SKILLS TO PERSUADE STRAGGLERS TO LEAVE, BUT DO NOT GET INTO A CONFRONTATION OR PLACE YOURSELF IN JEOPARDY. • REPORT VIOLATORS TO THE UNIVERSITY POLICE OFFICERS THAT ARE ON SCENE IMMEDIATELY AND RETREAT TO SAFETY.

  27. EVACUATION ASSEMBLY AREAS • EACH BUILDING’S EMERGENCY PLAN IDENTIFIES THE BUILDING’S ASSEMBLY AREAS. • IDENTIFY THESE AREAS SO YOU WILL KNOW WHERE TO DIRECT PEOPLE AS THEY ARE EVACUATED. • BE SURE THAT ASSEMBLY AREA DOES NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY VEHICLE RESPONSE • IN AN ACTUAL EMERGENCY, USE THE NEAREST SAFE EXIT FROM YOUR BUILDING, THEN CHECK IN AT THE NEAREST ASSEMBLY POINT FOR YOUR FACILITY.

  28. PREVENT RE-ENTRY • PLACE SIGNS AND/OR BARRIER TAPE AT ENTRANCES. • MOVE PEOPLE AWAY FROM ENTRYWAYS. • DO NOT TRY TO PHYSICALLY STOP SOMEONE THAT IS DETERMINED TO ENTER A CLOSED BUILDING. TRY TO DISSUADE THEM FROM GOING BACK INSIDE AND IMMEDIATELY REPORT VIOLATORS TO THE UNIVERSITY POLICE OFFICERS ON SCENE. • DO NOT OPEN BUILDINGS UNTIL AN “ALL CLEAR” IS COMMUNICATED BY THE UNIVERSITY POLICE, FIRE DEPARTMENT OR YOUR BUILDING COORDINATOR.

  29. EVACUATION ASSEMBLY AREAS • EACH BUILDING’S EMERGENCY PLAN IDENTIFIES THE BUILDING’S ASSEMBLY AREAS. • IDENTIFY THESE AREAS SO YOU WILL KNOW WHERE TO DIRECT PEOPLE AS THEY ARE EVACUATED. • IN AN ACTUAL EMERGENCY, USE THE NEAREST SAFE EXIT FROM YOUR BUILDING, THEN CHECK IN AT THE NEAREST ASSEMBLY POINT FOR YOUR FACILITY.

  30. WHEN NOT TO USE THE FIRE ALARM

  31. RULE OF THUMB • IF A FORCED EVACUATION WILL PLACE PEOPLE IN GREATER JEOPARDY THAN HAVING THEM REMAINING IN PLACE – SUCH AS DRAWING THEM INTO A CONTAMINATED AREA DUE TO CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, OR RADIOLOGICAL RELEASE OR INTO A VIOLENT SITUATION (ACTIVE SHOOTER) – THE FIRE ALARMSHOULDNOT BE SOUNDED AND PERSONS SHOULD SHELTER IN PLACE UNTIL A SAFER COURSE OF ACTION CAN BE DETERMINED.

  32. EARTHQUAKES • REMAIN CALM DURING AN EARTHQUAKE: • DROP, COVER AND HOLD • GET UNDER A STURDY DESK OR TABLE OR MOVE AGAINST INTERIOR WALLS AND AWAY FROM WINDOWS. BE AWARE OF FALLING OBJECT HAZARDS SUCH AS BOOKSHELVES, HANGING PICTURES, ECT.

  33. DURING AN EARTHQUAKE • Evacuation should NEVER be automatic. • There may be more danger outside your building or facility than there is inside. • The lighting inside your building or room will probably be out; it may be DARK • Before any decision is made to vacate all or part or a building, someone must find out that there IS: a safe route out, and a safe place to assemble on the outside.

  34. WHEN SHELTERING IN PLACE • Have people remain inside their office or classroom. • Close all windows and exterior doors. • Turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning systems. • Go to an interior room without windows, preferably above ground level in the case of a suspected chemical threat. • Continue to shelter in place until told that all is safe or directed to evacuate.

  35. PERSONS NEEDING ASSISTANCE • Be aware of persons that are sight, hearing, mobility, or cognitive impaired and provide an appropriate level of assistance. • Always ask a disabled person what, if any, assistance they require in an emergency.

  36. STAIRWELL STAGING FOR ASSISTEDEVACUATION • Stairwell landings are staging areas for those who require assistance to descend a stairway during an evacuation. • If possible, arrange to leave someone with a person who is staged for an assisted evacuation • Immediately notify police or public safety personnel of their specific location.

  37. EVACUATION CHAIRS • If your building is equipped with an evacuation chair, become familiar with their location and proper use. • In an emergency, you may be asked to be part of an evacuation team assigned to help others to get out of a building.

  38. LIFE SAFETY SYSTEMS • Obstructed Exit Access - All hallways and stairwells must always be maintained free of obstructions that may hinder the free movement of persons during an emergency. All doors must open and close freely.

  39. LIFE SAFETY SYSTEMS • All fire alarms, extinguishers, hoses, lighted exit signs and evacuation maps must be present and functional. Report damaged or malfunctioning systems immediately.

  40. STAIRWELL SAFETY • Use of Stairs – An elevator can become death traps in a fire or other emergency. All persons are directed to use the stairs to exit in an emergency. • Stairwells - Stairwell doors protect against smoke and fire intrusion. Doors should never be blocked or wedged open at any time. Stairwells provide a safe exit path.

  41. “LEADERSHIP” • During an emergency, people will tend to follow the directions of a person who displays leadership. • Floor Marshal members must assume that role by displaying a confident and authoritative presence while using verbal skills to providing clear, firm, but polite directions in order to gain control, maintain calmness, and obtain compliance.

  42. DEFINITIONS EVACUATION: • Building Coordinator & Police • Orderly movement of people from specific area. • Allows time to check for stragglers • An emergency that could happen in the next few days EMERGENCY EVACUATION: • Building Coordinator – Police & Fire • Need to move to a safer area immediately • Examples: • Fire in building • Hazardous Chemical spill

  43. DEFINITIONS RESCUE: • Fire Department • Catastrophic Event 2. Affected people need to seek shelter or survive until rescue arrives

  44. DEFINITIONS REFUGE: • Designated Area for a Threat such as a Fire. • Ideally, it is a Room with a Street facing Exterior Window. • Enables people to be seen and assisted. • The Refuge Should have a Strong Fire Door, Along with a Small Refuge Kit.

  45. DEFINITIONS RETREAT/SHELTER-IN-PLACE • Location in which people can go during a gunman in the building incident. • Have a bunker like quality. • Should be in the interior of the building. • Persons unable to flee impacted area.

  46. DEFINITIONS RETREAT/SHELTER-IN-PLACE • SHOULD HAVE RETREAT KIT: * First Aid Supplies * Portable Radio * Towels * Water * Flashlight • SIT OR LIE ON FLOOR • REMAIN INSIDE UNTIL POLICE ARRIVE AND ANNOUNCE THEMSELVES • RETREAT KIT SHOULD BE PART OF YOUR BUILDING’S EMERGENCY SUPPLIES.

  47. DEFINITIONS RALLY / ASSEMBLY POINTS: • Critical during an Evacuation. • Allows rapid head count to determine if anyone is missing. • At least 150 to 300 yards from building. • Avoid interfering with Emergency Responders. • THE RALLY POINTS: NEED TO BE MADE KNOWN TO EVERYONE INSIDE YOUR BUILDING AND THEY MUST CHECK IN AT THE RALLY POINT BEFORE LEAVING THE AREA. • Designate someone in charge of assembly area to take attendance . • Facilitates any search and rescue operations.

  48. DEFINITIONS RALLY/ASSEMBLY POINTS CONTINUED: • After attendance is complete notify emergency responders if anyone is missing. • Valuable time lost if someone leaves prior to checking in. • Need Secondary Rally Point in case primary rally point is unusable. • A GOOD RULE OF THUMB IS THAT A PRIMARY ASSEMBLY / RALLY POINT SHOULD BE NO CLOSER THAN 100 YARDS AND A SECONDARY POINT AT LEAST 300 YARDS AWAY.