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August 29, 2012 Welcome! In order to get to know you, please give me the answers to the following: What is your full na PowerPoint Presentation
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August 29, 2012 Welcome! In order to get to know you, please give me the answers to the following: What is your full na

August 29, 2012 Welcome! In order to get to know you, please give me the answers to the following: What is your full na

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August 29, 2012 Welcome! In order to get to know you, please give me the answers to the following: What is your full na

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  1. August 29, 2012 Welcome! In order to get to know you, please give me the answers to the following: What is your full name? What do you prefer to be called? How would you describe yourself in 20 words or less? Who do you live with and how many siblings do you have? How would you describe your school experience in 20 words or less? What are you interested in or even passionate about? (You might choose books based on this…) How have your language arts or English classes/reading been in the past?

  2. August 30, 2012 11th Grade CP English/Ms. Knudsen Unit One: The American Dream Essential Questions What was the original American Dream? How has it changed over time? How do YOU define the American Dream? Does everyone have personal (individual) access to the “dream”? Explain.

  3. September 5, 2012 Learning Target: I can prepare for a personal narrative by brainstorming details about my personal and family history. Entry Task: Please get yourself a SpringBoard reader from the boxes over on the counter. When you return to your seat, please get out the timed write you did at the end of class yesterday.

  4. September 6, 2012 Learning Target: I can distinguish between the denotation and connotation of a word in a written text. Task: Use the graphic organizer on pg. 11 in your reader. Homework:Make a chart comparing/contrasting things that differ from your generation and your grandparents’ generation.

  5. September 7, 2012 1st Learning Target: I can identify and describe points of comparison and contrast between my generation and older ones. Entry Task:Please get out a piece of paper. You will be creating a chart/graphic organizer comparing/contrasting your generation and your parents or grandparents generation.

  6. September 7, 2012 6th • Learning Target: I can begin to prepare and plan for a personal, reflective narrative on a significant moment in my life and how it has influenced my American Dream. • Entry Task:Please get out your compare/contrast graphic organizers on your generation and your parents or grandparents generation.

  7. September 10, 2012 • Remind about notebooks • Learning Target: • I can recognize and identify the elements of a reflective personal narrative by marking where I see them in a sample text. • I can plan, draft, and type a personal narrative on a significant moment in my life and how it has influenced my American Dream. • Entry Task:Please get out any and all materials you have associated with brainstorming for your American Dream narrative.

  8. September 11, 2012 • Learning Target: I can take my pre-writing and brainstorming and use it to make a draft of a personal narrative. • Entry Task: In your notebook or on a regular piece of paper, please write the date and respond to the following prompt: • Describe how the attacks on 9.11.01 affected the American Dream.

  9. September 12, 2012 • Learning Targets: • I can choose a novel for independent reading. • I can set up and maintain a read and response journal for my independent reading. • Entry Task:Quietly discuss BOOKS with your neighbor (things you’ve read, things they’ve read, what you’d be interested to read, etc. We will be leaving shortly. • For the remainder of class, you may choose between the following two options: • Organizing ideas and/or drafting your personal narrative • Reading in your independent novel, and completing a read and response journal entry

  10. September 13, 2012 • Learning Target:I can write a reflective essay that: • • Describes a significant incident and my response to it. • • Reflects on the significance of the incident. • Use the Personal Narrative Writing Workshop handout. • Entry Task:

  11. September 14, 2012 • Learning Target:I can write a reflective essay that: • • Describes a significant incident and my response to it. • • Reflects on the significance of the incident. • Use the Personal Narrative Writing Workshop handout. • Entry Task: Please get out your Personal Narrative materials. You will have the class period to organize your ideas and begin or continue to draft your essay.

  12. September 17, 2012 • Learning Target:I can write a reflective essay that: • • Describes a significant incident and my response to it. • • Reflects on the significance of the incident. • Entry Task:Please get out all your materials for your personal narrative essay. You will have all period to work on this. The official due date is this Wednesday, 9/19.

  13. September 18, 2012 • Learning Target:I can write a reflective essay that: • • Describes a significant incident and my response to it. • • Reflects on the significance of the incident. • Entry Task: Please get out all your materials for your personal narrative essay. You will have all period to work on this. The official due date is this Wednesday, 9/19.

  14. September 19, 2012 • Learning Target: I can identify and evaluate the philosophical, religious, ethical, and social influences that shaped the literature of a period. • Entry Task:Consider the word “influential” (look it up if you need). What does this have to do with what makes us unique as a society in America? In other words, what are the things and ideas that drive us?

  15. Puritans Q: What is their view of God? A: Theists; God is omnipotent and wrathful Q: What are their values? A: Morality, religion, Bible, God Q. How do they define truth? A: Faith, religion, God. Q: Do they have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? A: They were pessimists— “the glass is half empty.” Q: What is their view of work and worldly success? A: Staying industrious and working hard were considered pathways to God’s grace.

  16. Q: What is their view of society? A: Emphasis on the success of society as a whole. Q: What is their view of authority? A: Emphasis on authority; authority is based in religion and God’s word; authority was respected above anything else. Q: What is their view of education? A: Education is religious and faith- and Bible-based. Q: Do they view man as inherently good, evil, or somewhere in between? A: Man is basically evil and has to strive daily with temptations of all kinds.

  17. September 20, 2012 • Learning Target:I can identify and evaluate the philosophical, religious, ethical, and social influences that shaped the cultural norms and literature of a period. • Historical Group: Revolutionaries • Entry Task:In the journal section of your notebook, respond to the following: • Consider the words “revolution” or “revolutionary.” What does it make you think of? • Be prepared to take notes on the Revolutionaries on the same questions we used yesterday for Puritans.

  18. Revolutionaries Q: What is their view of God? A: Deists. God is benevolent; judges but doesn’t control. Q: What are their values? A: Usefulness; success; reason. Q: How do they define truth? A: Science and reason. Q: Do they have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? A: Optimistic view of life. Q: What are their views of work and worldly success? A: All men can achieve success through work.

  19. Q: What is their view of society? A: Emphasis is on the individual within society. Q: Who is their authority? A: Authority was not as important as liberty. Q: What is their view of education? A: Practical and vocational. Q: Do they view man as inherently good, evil, or somewhere in between? A: Man is perfectible and basically good.

  20. September 21, 2012 • Learning Target: • I can identify and evaluate the philosophical, religious, ethical, and social influences that shaped the cultural norms and literature of a period. • Historical Group: Transcendentalists • Entry Task:In the journal section of your notebook, respond to the following: • Consider (look up….) the word “transcend.” What does it make you think of?

  21. Transcendentalists Q: What is their view of God? A: Pantheists. God is omnipresent and omniscient. Q: What are their values? A: Nature, intuition. Q: How do they define truth? A: Intuition and instinct. Q: Do they have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? A: Idealistic view. Q: What are their views of work and worldly success? A: Success is measured by man’s correct relationship to his work.

  22. Q: What is their view of society? A: Emphasis is on the individual as superior to society. Q: Who is their authority? A: Importance of self-knowledge. Q: What is their view of education?A: Education is liberal; the aim is self-knowledge. Q: Do they view man as inherently good, evil, or somewhere in between? A: Man is divine and shares this divinity with all life.

  23. September 24, 2012 • Learning Target: I can read my AR book and write a double-entry journal about what I am reading. • Entry Task:Please take out your AR book and read quietly for the duration of the class period.

  24. September 25, 2012 • Learning Target: I can use my own notes to align beliefs and philosophies with one of three influential, historical, American groups. • Entry Task: (In journal section of your notebook) After taking notes and learning a little about the beliefs and philosophies of the Puritans, Revolutionaries, and Transcendentalists, which of the three groups do you feel you can identify with the most? Explain.

  25. September 26, 2012 Learning Target: I can create a thematic statement based on key words found in primary sources representative of a historical group. Entry Task: Please get out your Reader and mark the following pages for primary sources: Puritans p. 17-19 Revolutionaries p. 21-24 Transcendentalists p. 25-30

  26. Instructions: • Read through the texts and look for key words and phrases, especially as they would match up with what you already understand about each historical group. (Use your notes!!!) • Mark your text. Be sure and write a few of your thoughts (comments, questions, etc.) connected with your markings. When I check Readers, this will be something you get participation credit for. • Be prepared to share what you found in your reading so far in the last 10 minutes of class. • When you are ready to write your thematic statements, think of a 1 or 2 sentence summary of what each group stood for, believed in, and lived by. Imagine that an actual representative from each group were here in our classroom telling us what they were about. • We will share/discuss at the end of class.

  27. September 27, 2012 • Learning Target:I can create a thematic statement based on key words found in primary sources representative of a historical group. • Entry Task:Please get out your Readers and open to the text pieces for the three historical groups.

  28. September 28, 2012 • Learning Target:I can create a thematic statement based on key words found in primary sources representative of a historical group. • Entry Task:In the journal section of your notebook, please do a FREE WRITE journal entry. • You will be getting in your groups from Tuesday to create the thematic statements for the Puritans, Revolutionaries and Transcendentalists.

  29. October 1, 2012 • Learning Targets: • I can define the word tone in the vocab section of my notebook. • I can read in an independent novel and identify how tone words affect the story in my Read and Response journal. • Entry Task:Please get out your notebooks and open to the vocab section. • Record the following: • Tone: a writer’s or speaker’s attitude toward the subject. It is conveyed through the writer’s choice of words (diction) and detail (imagery).

  30. October 1, 2012 • Silent Reading Monday/Read and Response • Learning Target:I can read in an independent novel and identify how tone words affect the story in my Read and Response journal. • Tone: a writer’s or speaker’s attitude toward the subject. It is conveyed through the writer’s choice of words (diction) and detail (imagery). • Instructions: As you read during silent reading time today, for your read and response entry, please focus on at least one TONE word. Please be sure to describe clearly the connection of the word to something that is happening in the story in your response section. • *Don’t forget to include the date!!

  31. October 2, 2012 • Learning Targets: I can identify how diction and tone affect the overall theme of a text. • Entry Task:In the journal section of your notebook or in the My Notes margin on p. 31, respond to the following: • What words and phrases do you associate with American society? • Diction: word choice intended to convey a certain affect (tone) in a text.

  32. October 3, 2012 • Learning Target: • Entry Task:

  33. October 4, 2012 • Learning Targets: • I can compare poetic texts for tone. • I can write a reflection on how the tone of poetry connects to a theme (American Dream). • Entry Task:Please get out your TP-CASTT papers for America the Beautiful and open your Readers to p. 33. • You will be using the TP-CASTT strategy for five (yes, 5!!!) more poems with a variety of attitudes toward different aspects of American culture. • Please be ready to take notes in your Readers on exactly which pieces you will work with.

  34. October 5, 2012 • Learning Target: • I can compare poetic texts for tone. • I can write a reflection on how the tone of poetry connects to a theme (American Dream). • Entry Task:Please get out your TP-CASTT papers and your readers.

  35. October 8, 2012 • Learning Target: • I can identify and define tone in a poem/song. • I can write an analysis/reflection on the tone of two poems in terms of how they relate to my attitude about America. • Entry Task: Please get out your TP-CASTT assignments. • #1 America by Claude McKay p.33 • #2 Shine, Perishing Republic by Robinson Jeffersp.34 • #3 I Hear America Singing by Walt Whitmanp. 36 • #4 I, Too, Sing America by Langston Hughesp. 37 • #5 Indian Singing in Twentieth-Century America by Gail Tremblayp. 38

  36. Tone Analysis in Poetry Writing Prompt Choose two of the five poems you were assigned to TP-CASTT that most closely resemble your attitude toward America and explain why. Use specific examples from the poems you choose. Describe how personal experiences and/or observations align you with this/these attitude(s) and why.

  37. October 9, 2012 • Learning Target:I can analyze a nonfiction text for syntax and general organization. • Term to define: • Syntax—the arrangement of words and the order of grammatical elements in a sentence. • Entry Task:Please answer the following journal prompt in the Journal section of your notebook: • What are the biggest obstacles to people achieving their goals? What are the main things that help people achieve their goals. Explain.

  38. October 10, 2012 • Learning Target: • Entry Task:

  39. Thematic Content: Lifelong Dreamer—Vietnam Boat Person • By Mary-Beth McLaughlin • Focus: Obstacles and Supports in Reaching “The Dream” • Assignment—As you read the above text piece (p. 46), mark the text where: • Nancy Pham states her dream • The dream is threatened • The dream came into existence • ______________________________________________________________________________ • Sentence Analysis Follow-Up (from yesterday): • On the same paper as your graphic organizer, respond— • In 2-4 sentences, state what general observations you can make about the patterns you notice in Dan Rather’s writing. Examples would be several sentences with more than 15 words, vivid descriptions, etc.

  40. October 11, 2012 • Thematic Content: Lifelong Dreamer—Vietnam Boat Person • By Mary-Beth McLaughlin • Focus: Obstacles and Supports in Reaching “The Dream” • Learning Target: I can analyze a text and annotate it for specific elements. • Assignment—As you read the above text piece (p. 46), mark the text anywhere you see the following: • Nancy Pham states her dream • The dream is threatened • The dream comes into existence • DON’T just mark your text without adding your thoughts—true annotation has thinking attached to the markings. Use your My Notes margin in the Reader. • If you are looking for something else to do, READ!! You can get a pass to go to the library ONLY for checkout or AR quizzes, etc.

  41. Assignment List for the week of 10/8/12 (last week) 11 CP English/Knudsen • TP-CASTT (Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude (TONE), Shift, Theme, Title (again). • Use this strategy for the poems assigned in your Reader, beginning on p. 33 with America by Claude McKay and ending on p. 38 with Indian Singing in Twentieth-Century America by Gail Tremblay. • Follow-up Prompt: Choose two of the five poems you were assigned to TP-CASTT that most closely resemble your attitude toward America and explain why. Use specific examples from the poems you choose. Describe how personal experiences and/or observations align you with this/these attitude(s) and why. • Sentence Analysis Graphic Organizer using Dan Rather’sThey Live the Dream—choose 10 sentences from anywhere in the piece, number them in your Reader, and make sure they correspond with the numbers you put on the graphic organizer. • Follow-up Prompt: In 2-4 sentences, state what general observations you can make about the patterns you notice in Dan Rather’s writing. Examples would be several sentences with more than 15 words, vivid descriptions, etc. • Text-Marking using Lifelong Dreamer—Vietnam Boat Person by Mary-Beth McLaughlin—read the text and mark anywhere you see 1) Where Nancy Pham states her dream; 2) Where the dream is threatened; 3) Where the dream comes into existence. • Reminder: DON’T just mark the text; true annotation has thoughts attached to some of the markings in the text.

  42. October 12, 2012 • Learning Target: • Entry Task:

  43. October 15, 2012 Learning Target: I can examine a single topic (money) from multiple points of view. Key Term: Personification(p. 53 in your Reader)—a figure of speech that describes an object as having human qualities. Entry Task: Please record the definition of personification in the Vocab/Grammar section of your notebook. On a separate sheet of paper, please do a Quickwriteon the topic of money—any aspect of it you’d like. For example, you could write a few thoughts on what money means to you, why you work, what you need/want to spend your money on, etc.

  44. October 16, 2012 • Learning Targets: • I can examine a single topic (money) from multiple points of view • I can use language to reflect a particular tone and point of view • Entry Task:Please get out your Monologues (#2 from p. 53 yesterday), and your Readers and open them to p. 53. Be prepared to: • Share what you had money “say” (discuss what attitudes are reflected toward money) • Take brief notes in your Reader on the excerpt from A Raisin in the Sun

  45. Please record the following on p.54 in the My Notes margin: • Characters—Walter; Mama (Walter’s); Ruth (Walter’s wife); Beneatha (Walter’s sister—mentioned in the excerpt but has no speaking lines.) • A Raisin in the Sun is a play • African American family who has just received a large sum of money after the father’s death • Walter, the son, wants to invest in a liquor store • His mother objects; refuses to give him the money • What are the conflicting attitudes? • Questions for discussion: • What is the role of money in the family? • What lines show characters’ opinions? • What is the significance of money to Walter? To Mama? • Are your views on money more like Walter’s or Mama’s? • In one paragraph, elaborate on your answer to the last discussion question. Be sure to explain in detail your reasons for your attitude toward money. What have your influences and experiences been that have contributed to this attitude? • Turn in to the tray with yesterday’s work also by the end of the period.

  46. October 17, 2012 • PSAT Testing

  47. October 18, 2012 (1st period) • Learning Target: I can use a strategy (SIFT) to determine tone and theme of a text. • Entry Task:Please get out your Readers and be prepared to finish the story, marking the text and completing graphic organizer (SIFT).

  48. Follow-up Assignment for Money Quotes, the poem Money, the excerpt from A Raisin in the Sun, and the short story Mammon and the Archer • Choose ONE of the following options: • Draft a letter in the voice of either Mama in A Raisin in the Sun as she would write to old Anthony in Mammon and the Archer to give advice about money, or Aunt Ellen as she would write to Walter in Raisin. Your letter should make specific reference to details included in both stories. • Express a personal attitude toward money (perhaps agreeing or disagreeing with one of the Money Quotes on p.52), incorporating direct support of your idea(s) from at least three of the four texts in this activity. • Draft a review that analyzes and compares stylistic techniques used by the authors of the three texts in this unit to convey their perceptions of money and the American Dream. • Please turn in your choice of the above three on or with the same paper you did your SIFT on. If you did the SIFT in your Reader, please make a note of that on your paper.

  49. October 19, 2012 • *READ Mammon and the Archer to the class… • Learning Target: • Entry Task:

  50. October 22, 2012 • Learning Target: • I can read independently in a novel of my choice. • I can create a Read and Response journal entry based on what I read. • Silent reading/Read and Response: • Please create a Read and Response entry with today’s date in the Read and Response section of your notebook. • Reader Check: • Please have your Reader ready for me to check. I will be looking at text pieces you may have marked/annotated, and any other work you have done.