Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory

play fullscreen
1 / 79
Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory
184 Views
Download Presentation
aideen
Download Presentation

Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho territory

  2. Agenda • INTRODUCTION TO THE COMMITTEE • WHAT IS LAND USE PLANNING? • LAND USE PLANNING AND THE DEH CHO PROCESS • UPDATE ON DCLUPC ACTIVITIES & PROGRESS • INPUT DATA FOR LAND USE OPTIONS • LAND USE OPTIONS + ECONOMIC MODEL • CUMULATIVE EFFECTS RESEARCH • QUESTIONS AND DISCUSSION

  3. Committee & Staff • Committee Members • 2 DCFN reps (Tim Lennie and Petr Cizek) • 1 GNWT rep (Bea Lepine) • 1 Federal Government rep (Adrian Boyd) • Chairman selected by the 4 members (Herb Norwegian) • 5 Staff Members • Executive Director (Heidi Wiebe) • Office Manager (Sophie Bonnetrouge) • GIS Analyst (Monika Templin) • Land Use Planner (Paul Wilson) • Land Use Planner Trainee (Priscilla A. Canadien)

  4. What is Land Use Planning? Potential Land Uses Decisions (Planning Partners) (Staff & Committee) ? ? ? ? • DevelopmentConservation • Forestry - Green TLUO – Red • Tourism – Orange Wildlife – Blue • Oil and Gas – Purple Archaeology - Black • Minerals – Brown • Agriculture – Yellow Zones (Planning & Management)

  5. Land Use Planning in the Deh Cho • Land Use Planning means determining what types of land use activities should occur and where they should take place • “The purpose of the plan is to promote the social, cultural and economic well-being of residents and communities in the Deh Cho territory, having regard to the interests of all Canadians.” • Our planning area extends to the whole Deh Cho territory, excluding municipal areas and Nahanni National Park Reserve

  6. Plan Area

  7. Land Use Planning and the Deh Cho Process • Land Use Planning is only one part of the larger Deh Cho Process • Land Use Plan must be completed before the Deh Cho Process to be used by the three parties to negotiate in the Deh Cho Process • Draft Land Use Plan (2005) • Final Land Use Plan (March 2006) • Complete Deh Cho Process (~ 2008) • Land Use Plan will be revised to be consistent with the final agreement and every 5 years after

  8. Planning Partners + + 2nd Priority Businesses, Associations, non- governmental organizations 1st Priority Residents Approve Plan

  9. Planning vs. Management • Our mandate is to plan for future resource development – map potential, identify issues, write final plan to show “what” and “where” • We are not involved in past or current resource applications – current government structures do that (DCFN, GNWT and Gov of Canada) • May change with Deh Cho Process – Future Deh Cho Resource Management Authority

  10. Update on DCLUPC Activities & Progress • Staff Recruitment • Round 1 Consultation Feedback • Q & A Report • Further Research: • Wildlife Workshop, • Dene Nahodhe Workshop • Economic Development Model Completed • Reviewing Various Land Use Options

  11. Land Use Options • Land Use Options represent different visions for the final land use map • Represent 5 different levels of development • Based on information (mostly scientific) gathered to date – little community or planning partner input yet • Will be revised based on feedback and presented at the next round of meetings

  12. Options Development

  13. Wildlife • Traditional Knowledge & Expert Research • Regional Wildlife Workshop - Held: November 2003 • 308 species in the Deh Cho territory (3 amphibians, 36 fish, 213 birds and 56 mammals) • Key species include: • Caribou, Moose, Bison, Fish and Waterfowl for consumption • Trumpeter Swan, Whooping Crane, Peregrine Falcon (Endangered) • Black Bear, Grizzly Bear, Furbearers, Dall’s Sheep, and Mountain Goat (Trapping & Hunting species) • Critical wildlife areas include: • Nahanni National Park Reserve • Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary (denning, staging and calving, etc.) • Edehzhie • Central area between Fort Liard & Wrigley • Important consideration for Cumulative Effects Management

  14. Wildlife Potential

  15. Traditional Use Density • Important to Traditional Dene Lifestyles • Information gathered by DCFN • Consulted 386 harvesters and mapped information • Harvest areas, kill sites, sacred sites, berry patches • DCFN approved publication and use at Kakisa Assembly 2004 • Planning Committee only gets generalized density of use, not raw data

  16. Traditional Use Density

  17. Archeology, Cabins, Historic Sites & Rare features • Evidence of past human use • Important small sites i.e. fire rings, cabins, trails • Buffer required for protection • Development must avoid these areas • Rare Features: • i.e. Hot Springs and Karst Formations Conservation Value is determined by distance from these important sites

  18. Archeology, Rare features, Historic Sites & Cabins

  19. Conservation Value Map

  20. Minerals • Assessed 9 mineral types thought to have the most potential in the region • The highest potential is in the western tip of the territory, moderate in the west-central portions and low in the remaining areas • The most significant minerals types are Copper, Lead-Zinc & Tungsten (existing mines) • The western portion has high to very high potential for Skarn (Lead-Zinc, Gold and Tungsten)

  21. Minerals

  22. Oil & Gas • 20 hydrocarbon plays in the Deh Cho • 9 confirmed • 11 unconfirmed • 419 hydrocarbon wells drilled, most are wildcat wells (exploratory) but 127 (25%) found hydrocarbons • Current producing regions are Fort Liard and Cameron Hills; other significant discoveries found but not yet developed • Greatest potential is in the Liard Plateau and the Great Slave Plain (northern extension of the western sedimentary basin)

  23. Oil and Gas Potential

  24. Tourism • The greatest potential is along the Mackenzie and Liard River valleys and radiates out from communities (the “hub and spoke” effect.) • Exceptionally scenic, offer various types of tourism experiences and have good access • Key tourism destinations include Nahanni National Park Reserve, the Ram Plateau and North Nahanni River, Little Doctor Lake, Cli Lake, Trout Lake and some lodges • Deh Cho tourism is not well developed but has lots of potential - it can still offer tourists pristine wilderness free from commercial interruption

  25. Tourism Potential

  26. Forestry Potential • Productive timber stands around Fort Liard, Nahanni region, Jean Marie River and the Cameron Hills • Current timber harvest well below sustainable harvest levels (20 years harvest) • Low prices $ and difficult access may impact commercial viability • Potential for community use for log houses and cut lumber in fly-in communities

  27. Forestry Potential

  28. Agricultural Potential • Agriculture is small scale generally within community boundaries • Potential not developed – minor land use • Limitations include; climate, soil type, difficulties with access and power requirements • South have competitive advantage • Cost of food - opportunities and potential for community use

  29. Agricultural Potential

  30. Composite of Development Potential

  31. Preliminary Land Use Options • Change Priority of Conservation and Development • Create 5 Land Use Options • Shows a range of possibilities available • Compare to Current Land Withdrawals • Use Economic model to compare effects on economy Low Development High Conservation High Development Low Conservation Options 1 2 3 4 5

  32. Zones • Multiple Use Zones: all development uses permitted subject to general regulations • Conservation Zones: no development permitted • Uncertain Zones: conservation and development hold equal priority, no decision possible • Traditional Use Allowed Everywhere

  33. Land Use Option # 1

  34. Land Use Option # 2

  35. Land Use Option # 3

  36. Land Use Option # 4

  37. Land Use Option # 5

  38. Interim Land Withdrawals Approval Land Use Planning • Land Withdrawals identified critical areas for interim protection • Land Use Plan will revise Land Withdrawals 5 years in parallel Interim Land Withdrawals

  39. Interim Land Withdrawals

  40. Interim Land Withdrawals

  41. Economic Development Assessment Model • Determines costs & benefits for informed land use planning decisions • Model current economy then predict the next 20 years • Driven by level of development in 5 key sectors • Allows us to see the economic impact of developing each resource sector, and some specific projects • Apply Economic Assessment Model to each of five Land Use Options and the existing land withdrawals • Results are regional not community based • Results are preliminary – more refinement required

  42. Economic Development Assessment Model

  43. Economic Assessment Model Outputs Economic Assessment Model: generates direct, indirect and induced estimates reflecting the level of development in 5 key sectors for the following: • Gross Production • GDP or Value Added by Industry • Labour Income – Southern, Northern and Aboriginal • Employment by Industry– Southern, Northern and Aboriginal • Tax revenues to the Federal Government and the GNWT • Population and Labour Force

  44. Agricultural Hectares Developed

  45. Forestry Volume Produced (Millions of M3)

  46. Gas Development (Millions of M3)

  47. Mining Development • Large Developments – major impacts especially during construction • Modeled 3 mines:

  48. Tourism Sites Developed

  49. Timing of Development

  50. Total Direct Employment # 3