chapter 5 dna gene expression and biotechnology n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 5: DNA, Gene Expression, and Biotechnology PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 5: DNA, Gene Expression, and Biotechnology

play fullscreen
1 / 130

Chapter 5: DNA, Gene Expression, and Biotechnology

190 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Chapter 5: DNA, Gene Expression, and Biotechnology

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Chapter 5: DNA, Gene Expression, and Biotechnology What is the code and how is it harnessed? Lectures by Mark Manteuffel, St. Louis Community College

  2. In this chapter • the process of gene expression. • the causes and effects of damage to the genetic code. • biotechnology and its implications for human health.

  3. 5.1 “The DNA 200” Knowledge about DNA is increasing justice in the world.

  4. What is the most common reason why DNA analyses overturn incorrect criminal convictions?

  5. DNA Characteristics • DNA is a molecule that all living organisms carry in every cell in their body.

  6. DNA Characteristics • Unique in virtually every person, DNA can serve as an individual identifier, left behind us as we go about our lives.

  7. 5.2 The DNA molecule contains instructions for the development and functioning of all living organisms.

  8. Two Important Features of DNA (1) DNA contains the instructions on how to create a body and control its growth and development. (2) The instructions encoded in the DNA molecule are passed down from parent to offspring.

  9. DNA “Double Helix” Nucleic acids and nucleotides

  10. Sugars, Phosphates, and Bases Purines: Adenine, and Guanine - Two-ring Pyrimidines: Thymine, and Cytosine - One-ring

  11. Nucleic Acid • DNA is a nucleic acid, a macromolecule that stores information. • It consists of individual units called nucleotides: a sugar, a phosphate group, and a nitrogen-containing base.

  12. Nucleic Acid • DNA’s structure resembles a twisted ladder, • sugar and phosphate groups serving as the backbone • base pairs serving as the rungs.

  13. 5.3 Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making proteins.

  14. Prokaryotes – information is contained within circular pieces of DNA • Eukaryotes (including humans) – information is laid out in long linear strands of DNA • Humans – 3,000,000,000 base pairs • 23 unique pieces of DNA • 2 copies of each piece • 1from mom • 1from dad • total of 46 chromosomes and 6,000,000,000 base pairs in every cell!

  15. FIGURE 5-6 The genome unpacked

  16. The number of chromosomes varies from species to species. • Corn has 10 unique chromosomes. • Fruit flies have only four. • Dogs and chickens have 39 different chromosomes. • Goldfish have 47 chromosomes. • Individuals in each of these species inherit one copy of each chromosome from each parent.

  17. Genes • A sequence of bases in a DNA molecule that carries the information necessary for producing a functional product, usually a protein molecule or RNA

  18. DNA Code • a universal language that provides the instructions for building all the structures of all living organisms. • Genome - the full set of DNA an organism carries

  19. Gene Characteristics • A gene is a sequence of bases in a DNA molecule that carries the information necessary for producing a functional product, usually a protein molecule or RNA.

  20. 5.4 Not all DNA contains instructions for making proteins.

  21. An onion has five times as much DNA as a human. Why doesn’t that make them more complex than us?

  22. The Proportion of the DNA That Codes for Genes

  23. Introns • Non-coding regions of DNA • May take the form of short (or long) sequences that are repeated thousands of times • May also consist of gene fragments, duplicate versions of genes, and pseudogenes

  24. Introns • Only a small fraction of the DNA in eukaryotic species codes for genes.

  25. 5.5 How do genes work? An overview

  26. Genotype • all of the genes contained in an organism • Phenotype • the physical manifestations of the instructions

  27. Gene Expression • The genes in strands of DNA are a storehouse of information, an instruction book.

  28. Gene Expression The process by which this information is used to build an organism occurs in two main steps: • transcription, in which a copy of the a gene’s base sequence is made, and • translation, in which that copy is used to direct the production of a protein.

  29. 5.6 Transcription: reading the information coded in DNA

  30. Transcription • the first step in the two-step process by which DNA directs the synthesis of proteins. • a single copy of one specific gene within the DNA is made, in the form of a molecule of mRNA, which moves where it can be translated into a protein.

  31. 5.7 Translation: using information from DNA to build usable molecules

  32. Several ingredients must be present in the cytoplasm for translation to occur. • Free amino acids • Ribosomal units • Transfer RNA

  33. Translation • the second step in the two-step process by which DNA directs the synthesis of proteins. • the information from a gene that has been carried by the nucleotide sequence of an mRNA is read, and ingredients present in the cell’s cytoplasm are used to produce a protein.

  34. 5.8 Causes and effects of mutation • Alteration of the sequence of bases in DNA • can lead to changes in the structure and function of the proteins produced • can have a range of effects