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Today became GREAT when YOU arrived! PowerPoint Presentation
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Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!

Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!

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Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!

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  1. Today became GREAT whenYOUarrived!

  2. Welcome! Today’s Agenda: • I can explain the elements of differentiated instruction. • I can use differentiated strategies to meet the diverse interests, learning profiles and readiness levels of my students. Jacque Melin melinj@gvsu.edu www.formativedifferentiated.com

  3. Most-Effective Teachers J.W. Lloyd, E.J. Kameanui, and D. Chard (Eds.) (1997) Issues in educating students with disabilities.

  4. How do I meet the needs of all learners when student needs and talents vary so greatly?

  5. SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. • Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action. • Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles. • Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  6. TARGET • I can explain the key elements of differentiated instruction.

  7. Elements of Differentiation Community Curriculum • Teacher/Student Connections • Safe Environment • Shared Partnership Assessment • Essential KUDs (Targets) • Engagement • Teaching up Instruction • Pre-Assessments • Formative (on-going) • Assessments to inform instruction • 3-P Grading • Addressing Readiness, Interests, Learning Profiles • Multiple strategies • Flexible management From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  8. Common Sense Differentiation • Create a learning environment that supports the hard work of learning. • Be clear about the learning destination (TARGETS) • Know where students are in relation to the destination (FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS) • Adjust teaching to make sure that students arrive at the destination (and move beyond it) (DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCITON) COMMUNITY CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT INSTRUCTION From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  9. Differentiating Instruction… IS… is NOT… Individualizing instruction for each student Providing instruction to meet the range of student needs From Katie Ellis

  10. Differentiating Instruction… is NOT… IS… Using varied strategies that address students’ readiness, interests, and learning styles Assigning all students the same activities all of the time From Katie Ellis

  11. Differentiating Instruction… is NOT… IS… Using varied resources for varied learners Using the same instructional materials for all students From Katie Ellis

  12. Differentiating Instruction… is is NOT… IS… Using multiple means of assessment Assessing all students’ learning in the same way From Katie Ellis

  13. Differentiation is NOT a set of strategies…. • It’s a way of thinking about teaching and learning Strategies are TOOLS to accomplish the goals of DI. They are no more differentiation than a hammer and saw are the house they help to build. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  14. #1QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning • Mindset Connections Community Quality DI Begins with a growth mindset, moves to student-teacher connections, & evolves to community. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  15. The Predictive power of mindset • Fixed • Success comes from being smart • Genetics, environment determine what we can do • Some students are smart – some aren’t • Teachers cannot override students’ learning profiles. • Growth • Success comes from effort • With hard work, most students can do most things • Teachers can override students’ learning profiles • A key role of the teacher is to set high goals, provide high support, ensure student focus – to find the things that makes school work for a student. • C. Tomlinson, August 2010 Wildly Exciting Education

  16. Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset • Challenges • Avoid challenges • Obstacles • Give up easily • Effort • See effort as fruitless or worse • Criticism • Ignore useful negative feedback • Success of Others • Feel threatened by the success of others • As a result, they may plateau early and achieve less than their full potential. • Challenges • Embrace challenges • Obstacles • Persist in the face of setbacks • Effort • See effort as a path to mastery • Criticism • Learn from criticism • Success of Others • Find lessons and inspiration in the success of others • As a result, they reach ever higher levels of achievement. Carol Dweck, Ph.D

  17. A Visual Analogy for your consideration

  18. Katie Couric interview with Captain Sully Sullenberger Captain Sully Sullenberger What do you find to be the most compelling thing he has to say? Why does it strike you as the most important? What does any of this have to do with teaching?

  19. What kind of pilot are you?

  20. #2QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning Is Rooted in Meaningful Curriculum

  21. Clear Learning Targets shift us away from what we, as teachers, are covering towards what our students are learning.

  22. Frayer Model Definition Facts/Characteristics • Measureable & attainable • Focus on intended learning • Focus on “chunks” of a standard • Clear, specific language • congruent to standard Clear description of what is to be learned; Provides a clear vision of the ‘destination’ for student learning Learning Target Examples Nonexamples Adding Fractions Do Exercise 3.7 on pg 148 Learning Activities Tasks Pre-Requisites Assessments I can add fractions with unlike denominators. I can identify the parts of a plant.

  23. #3QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning Is guided by on-going assessment for planning and feedback (not grades)

  24. #4QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning Addresses student readiness, interest and learning profile.

  25. How We Teach Makes A Difference!

  26. Steps to Create a Choice Lesson Differentiated • by Learning Preference, Interest or Readiness • Identify the subject and topic of study (unit). • Use curriculum documents to determine what you want the students to know, understand and be able to do (TARGETS). • Decide on an activity structure that will allow students to choose a task that interests them (e.g., choice boards, RAFT, cubing or thinkdot activity, learning contract, WebQuest, etc.) • Brainstorm a variety of tasks based on what you know about the learning preferences of your students. • Eliminate tasks that will not lead the students to TARGETS. • Choose the activities that will be the most engaging for your students and best match their learning preferences. • Check to see that all students will reach the same TARGETS, no matter which task(s) they complete. • Describe the learning activities in detail. Create student handouts, if appropriate. • Determine how student work will be assessed. • Decide how you will facilitate sharing and bring closure to the lesson.

  27. Don’t Bother Differentiating FLUFF If you are going to spend time planning to differentiate by interest, learning profile, or readiness, be sure to use key understanding!!!

  28. Prufrock Press

  29. SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. • Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action. • Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles. • Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

  30. Thinking About the Sternberg Intelligences ANALYTICAL Linear – Schoolhouse Smart - Sequential Show the parts of _________ and how they work. Explain why _______ works the way it does. Diagram how __________ affects __________________. Identify the key parts of _____________________. Present a step-by-step approach to _________________. Streetsmart – Contextual – Focus on Use PRACTICAL Demonstrate how someone uses ________ in their life or work. Show how we could apply _____ to solve this real life problem ____. Based on your own experience, explain how _____ can be used. Here’s a problem at school, ________. Using your knowledge of ______________, develop a plan to address the problem. CREATIVE Innovator – Outside the Box – What If - Improver Find a new way to show _____________. Use unusual materials to explain ________________. Use humor to show ____________________. Explain (show) a new and better way to ____________. Make connections between _____ and _____ to help us understand ____________. Become a ____ and use your “new” perspectives to help us think about ____________.

  31. Story Response: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can describe the theme or message that a writer or author wants to communicate.

  32. Food Pyramid: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can explain the changes in the food pyramid.

  33. Immigration: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can explain the meaning of “melting pot,” “mosaic,” and “salad bowl” as they relate to immigration in America.

  34. Dividing Fractions: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can explain and apply fraction division.

  35. Spelling: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Multiple Intelligences) TARGET: I can use spelling patterns to help me spell new words.

  36. Spelling Patterns Tic-Tac-Toe

  37. Vocabulary: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Multiple Intelligences) Target: I can use strategies to help me decode unknown words.

  38. Story Elements: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic) Target: I can describe the elements of a story (characters, setting, plot).

  39. Novel Think Tac-Toe Directions: Select and complete one activity from each horizontal row to help you and others think about your novel. Remember to make your work thoughtful, original, rich with detail, and accurate. Novel Title: ____________________ Author:_______________________ Activities Selected: _______, _____, _____ Student: ______________________

  40. Counting Principles & Probability: Tic-Tac-Toe Board • (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic) • Targets: • I can write the steps of a math induction proof for a given series. • I can apply Pascal’s Triangle to find the coefficients of a binomial expansion. • I can apply the Binomial Theorem to expand a binomial. • I can find probabilities of mutually exclusive & independent events.

  41. Paul Revere’s Ride: • Tic-Tac-Toe BoardTargets: • I can analyze situations that illustrate conflicts between conscience and respect for authority • I can identify key terms: King George III, Proclamation of 1763, Quartering Act, revenue, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Patrick Henry, boycott, Sons of Liberty, Crispus Attucks, the Townshend Acts, writs of assistance, Samuel Adams, Boston Massacre, John Adams, committee of correspondence, Boston Tea Party, militia, Minutemen, Intolerable Acts, First Continental Congress, Paul Revere, Lexington and Concord, Loyalist, Patriot, mercenary